Classroom desk and drawn blackboard of chemistry teaching with books and instruments. Chemical sciences education concept. Horizontal composition. Front view
Associate of Science
Course OverviewCourse Guide
 

The Associate of Science degree is appropriate for those students who plan to pursue further study in Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics or Physics. This degree is also appropriate for those interested in careers in Statistics, Mathematics, Bio-technology, Medical Sciences, Engineering and Secondary Education majors who plan to major in a Science (e.g. Math, Biology, Geology, Chemistry or Physics teachers).

It is required that individuals considering a career in science meet with one of the science faculty to discuss specific courses to meet their academic needs.

 

 

Communications (6 credit hours)

ENG 121 English Composition I* 3 credits
COM 150 Public Speaking* 3 credits

 

Humanities and Fine Arts (choose 2 courses (6 credits) from 2 different prefixes)

ART 100 Art Appreciation* 4 credits
ART 220 History of Art I* 4 credits
ART 221 History of Art II* 4 credits
ENG 201, 233 or 234 Literature Classes* 4 credits
HIST 101 Western Civilization I: Ancient World to 1715* 4 credits
HIST 102 Western Civilization II: Europe c. 1700 to Present* 4 credits
HUM 101 Modern Culture and the Arts* 4 credits
HUM 234 World Mythologies 4 credits
LNG 161 Spanish I 4 credits
MUS 150 Music Appreciation* 4 credits
PHIL 210 Ethics* 4 credits
PHIL 230 Introduction to Philosophy* 3 credits
REL 231 Comparative Religions* 4 credits
REL 232 Old Testament* 4 credits
REL 233 New Testament* 4 credits

 

Social Science (choose 2 courses (6 credits) from 2 different prefixes)

ANTH 201 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology* 4 credits
ECON 203 Principles of Economics (Micro)* 4 credits
HIST 201 U.S. History I: European Colonization to 1877* 4 credits
HIST 202 U.S. History II: Reconstruction to the Present* 4 credits
HIST 204 History of Michigan* 4 credits
PSI 110 American Government & Political Science* 4 credits
PSI 111 State and Local Government* 3 credits
PSY 101 Psychology* 4 credits
PSY 250 Human Sexuality* 4 credits
PSY 260 Social Psychology* 4 credits
SOC 120 Principles of Sociology* 4 credits
SOC 121 Modern Social Problems* 4 credits
SOC 220 Marriage & Family* 4 credits
Subtotal Credits for Communications, Humanities and Social Sciences 20 to 22 credits

 

General Science (includes MTA requirements for Mathematics and Natural Sciences)

BIO 110 Form and Function# 3 credits
OR
BIO 125 Environment and Society 4 credits
BIO 121 General Biology I* 4 credits
BIO 122 General Biology II* 4 credits
BIO 101 Human Biology 4 credits
CHEM 133 General Chemistry I* 4 credits
CHEM 134 General Chemistry II* 4 credits
CHEM 210 Organic Chemistry I 4 credits
CHEM 211 Organic Chemistry II 4 credits
MATH 151 College Algebra* 4 credits
MATH 161 Calculus I* 4 credits

 

Plus 6-9 hours of science electives in the following prefixes: BIO, CHEM, GEOG, GEOL, PHYS, or Mathematics at MATH 162 Calculus II or higher
 

Subtotal Credits for General Science Degree: 38 to 40 credits
Subtotal Credits for Communications, Humanities and Social Sciences: 20 to 22 credits
Minimum Credits needed: 60 credits
NOTE: No courses below the 100 level will be accepted toward this degree.

NOTE: Anyone beginning the Associate of Science Degree at Glen Oaks in Fall 2016 or later must complete MTA requirements in order to qualify for the degree.

*Course has a prerequisite

#Course required for individuals wanting to transfer to Western Michigan University only

 

Scope & Sequence (General Path)

Fall 1 Winter 1 Fall 2 Winter 2
ENG 121* COM 150* BIO 101 CHEM 211#
BIO 110 or BIO 125 BIO 121 BIO 122 1 – 200 level SCIENCE Elective#
MATH 104 or MATH 151 or MATH 161 CHEM 134 CHEM 210 1 – additional MATH or Science Elective
CHEM 133* Next highest math (if needed) 2 – Humanities or Social Science Electives 2 – Humanities or Social Science Electives
–Science electives may come from BIO, CHEM, GEOG, GEOL or PHYS prefix
#200 level science course includes capstone project
*Meet MTA requirement of 30 credit hours

Effective: Fall 2016
Current/Updated as: 3/23/2017
 

handsome young father in police uniform carrying his little son
Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice
Course OverviewCourse GuideAdditional InformationNOCTI Test Results
 

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration
This program prepares individuals to apply theories and practices of criminal justice to structuring, managing, directing and controlling criminal justice agencies, including police departments, sheriff’s departments, law enforcement divisions and units, and private protective services.

Goals of the program are to provide knowledge and skills necessary for students interested in careers in criminal justice including: Police –State, County and Local Agencies, Criminal Investigator, Corrections Officer, Probation Officer, Parole Officer, Juvenile System, Private Security Officer. Program Level Assessment will include the following:

  • Explore the causes of crime and options for controlling it.
  • Examine fundamental concepts underlying the practice of justice.
  • Document the results of an investigation in an acceptable manner.
  • Analyze the impact of crime on our society.
  • Evaluate situations and determine sound moral, ethical, and legal implications.

 

 

Required Coursework (53 hours)

CRJU 110 Introduction to Law Enforcement 3 credits
CRJU 111 Police Administration 3 credits
CRJU 120 Criminology 3 credits
CRJU 211 Prevention of Crime & Juvenile Delinquency* 3 credits
CRJU 114 Introduction to Corrections 3 credits
CRJU 113 Criminal Investigation 3 credits
CRJU/PHED 145 Physical Fitness for Law Enforcement 2 credits
CRJU 212 Community Relations 3 credits
CRJU 214 Public Service Administration 3 credits
CRJU 216 Probation and Parole 3 credits
CRJU 218 Social Justice 3 credits
ENG 121 English Composition I* 3 credits
ENG 122 English Composition II* 3 credits
PHIL 210 Ethics* 4 credits
PSI 111 State & Local Government* 3 credits
PSY 101 Psychology* 4 credits
SOC 120 Principles of Sociology* 4 credits

 

Communications (3 required credit hours)

COM 140 Speech* 3 credits
OR
COM 150 Public Speaking* 3 credits

 

Mathematics (4 required credit hours)

MATH 117 Finite Math* 4 credits
OR
MATH 201 Intro to Statistics* 4 credits
Total: 60 credits
*Course has a prerequisite

 

Scope & Sequence

Fall 1 Winter 1 Fall 2 Winter 2
CRJU 110 CRJU 111 CRJU 211 CRJU 216
CRJU 114 CRJU 120 CRJU 212 CRJU 218
ENG 121 CRJU 113 CRJU 214 PSI 111
MATH 117 SOC 120 COM 150 PHIL 210
ENG 122 PSY 101 CRJU/PHED 145

 

Effective: Fall 2014
Current/Updated: 3/18/16

 

 

Employment Information

Program Information

The Associate of Applied Science
in Criminal Justice prepares
individuals to apply theories
and practices of criminal justice
to structuring, managing,
directing and controlling criminal
justice agencies, including
police departments, sheriff’s
departments, law enforcement
divisions and units, and private
protective services.

Criminal Justice encompasses both law enforcement and corrections. Law enforcement careers can be at the local, state and regional levels and include positions such as police officers, sheriff deputies, investigators and detectives who protect people by enforcing the law.

Careers in corrections include positions such as probation and parole officers and private security officers.

Law enforcement duties include responding to emergency and non-emergency calls, patrolling assigned areas, conducting traffic stops, issuing citations, obtaining warrants, detaining and arresting suspects, filling out the proper paperwork and testifying for cases in court.

Persons employed in corrections are responsible for overseeing individuals who have been arrested and are awaiting trial, monitoring those who have been sentenced to serve time in confinement, or supervising those on parole or probation.

According to the Bureau of Employment Services Occupational Handbook, the median salary for those in law enforcement was $56,980 per year in 2012,
while median pay for those working in corrections jobs was $48,190. Earning a Criminal Justice degree offers you an excellent career outlook and a variety of career options.

The goal of the program is to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary for careers in criminal justice. Students will explore the causes of crime and options for controlling it, while examining the fundamental concepts underlying the practice of justice. Students will learn how to document the results of an investigation in an acceptable, moral and ethical manner and analyze the impact of crime on our society.


Is this for me?
A career in Criminal Justice can lead to a wide variety of jobs in the public service sector. Those in this profession are able to pay attention to detail, yet they are able to multitask. Communications skills and applying good judgment are critical to this profession. Positions as officers and
detectives also require strength and stamina.

The Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice provides students with a basic introduction to prepare them for positions in law enforcement at all levels.

 

 

National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI)
Standardized Test Results (2016):
NOCTI Criminal Justice Test Results
Crime Scene Management Use of Force Criminal Law & Procedures Health Issues Police Concepts & Skills
GOCC Students 66.1 87.1 76.7 70.0 73.5
State Avg 56.1 78.8 70.8 67.9 76.5
National Avg 60.4 73.4 71.0 67.0 70.2

 

NOCTI Criminal Justice Test Results
Court System Communication Security: National, International & Private Understanding & Working with Special Populations
GOCC Students 68.6 70.7 78.8 88.6
State Avg 57.1 65.3 70.6 68.6
National Avg 64.5 67.0 72.4 76.5

 

NOCTI Criminal Justice Test Results
Composite Score
GOCC Students 74.8
State Avg 68.8
National Avg 68.8

 

 

The businessman is working on brand ideas at the desk
Associate of Visual Arts with Emphasis in Graphic Design
Course OverviewCourse GuideAdditional Information
The Associate of Arts degree with emphasis in Graphic Design is appropriate for students who want to pursue a career or further study in the fields of Advertising Design, Graphic Design or Digital Design. The degree provides grounding in design fundamentals, the use of design software and hardware, web design, and advertising principles. There is additional emphasis on a broad academic base needed to inform the artistic process and lay the groundwork for further study. The degree prepares the student to transfer to a four-year college, university or art school.

Art Studio Requirements (18 credit hours)

ART 115 Introduction to Graphic Design 3 credits
ART 116 Color for Graphic Design 3 credits
ART 170 Image Manipulation: Photoshop 3 credits
ART 172 Digital Illustration* 3 credits
ART 274 Typography* 3 credits
ART 276 Advertising Design* 3 credits

 

Art Studio Electives (Choose 9 credit hours)

ART 104 Object Drawing 3 credits
ART 107 Two Dimensional Design 3 credits
ART 108 Three Dimensional Design 3 credits
ART 160 Basic Photography 3 credits
ART 210 Life Drawing* 3 credits
ART 231 Sculpture* 3 credits
ART 240 Painting 3 credits
ART 241 Printmaking: Intaglio and Relief 3 credits
ART 242 Watercolor I 3 credits
ART 243 Watercolor II* 3 credits
ART 244 Oil Painting I 3 credits
ART 245 Oil Painting II* 3 credits
ART 246 Printmaking: Silk Screen 3 credits
ART 252 Pastel I 3 credits
ART 253 Pastel II* 3 credits
ART 260 Advanced Photography* 3 credits

 

Capstone Course (2 required credit hours)

ART 290 Portfolio* 2 credits

 

Business (6 required credit hours)

BUS 104 Introduction to Business 3 credits
BUS 153 Advertising* 3 credits

 

History of Art (Choose 4 credit hours)

ART 220 History of Art I* 4 credits
ART 221 History of Art II* 4 credits

 

Communications (9 required credit hours)

ENG 121 English Composition I* 3 credits
ENG 122 English Composition II* 3 credits
COM 150 Public Speaking* 3 credits

 

Humanities (choose 4 credit hours)

HIST 101 Western Civilization I: Ancient World to 1715* 4 credits
HIST 102 Western Civilization II: Europe c. 1700 to Present* 4 credits
HUM 101 Modern Culture and the Arts* 4 credits
ENG 201, 233 or 234 4 credits
LNG 161, 162, 163 or 261 4 credits
MUS 150 Music Appreciation* 4 credits
PHIL 210 Ethics* 4 credits
PHIL 230 Introduction to Philosophy* 3 credits
REL 231, 232 or 233 4 credits

 

Mathematics (choose 4 credit hours)

MATH 104 Intermediate Algebra* 4 credits
MATH 105 Fundamentals of Modern Math* 4 credits
MATH 117 Finite Mathematics* 4 credits
MATH 151 College Algebra* 4 credits
MATH 161 Calculus I and Analytic Geometry* 4 credits
MATH 162 Calculus II and Analytic Geometry* 4 credits
MATH 201 Introduction to Statistics* 3 credits

 

Social Science (choose 8 credit hours from 2 different prefixes)

ANTH 201 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology* 4 credits
ECON 203 Principles of Economics (Micro)* 4 credits
ECON 204 Principles of Economics (Macro)* 4 credits
HIST 101 Western Civilization I: Ancient World to 1715* 4 credits
HIST 102 Western Civilization II: Europe c. 1700 to Present* 4 credits
HIST 201 U.S. History I: European Colonization to 1877* 4 credits
HIST 202 U.S. History II: Reconstruction to the Present* 4 credits
HIST 204 History of Michigan* 4 credits
PSI 110 American Government & Political Science* 4 credits
PSI 111 State and Local Government* 3 credits
PSY 101 Psychology* 4 credits
PSY 201 Psychology & Personality* 3 credits
PSY 210 Human Growth & Development* 4 credits
PSY 220 Abnormal Psychology* 4 credits
PSY 250 Human Sexuality* 4 credits
PSY 260 Social Psychology* 4 credits
SOC 120 Principles of Sociology* 4 credits
SOC 121 Modern Social Problems* 4 credits
SOC 220 Marriage & Family* 4 credits

 

Natural Science (choose 4 credit hours with labs)

BIO 120 Biology* 4 credits
BIO 121 General Biology I* 4 credits
BIO 122 General Biology II* 4 credits
BIO 125 Environment and Society* 3 credits
BIO 201 Ecology* 4 credits
BIO 210 Anatomy & Physiology I* 4 credits
BIO 211 Anatomy & Physiology II* 4 credits
BIO 212 Pathophysiology* 4 credits
BIO 230 Microbiology* 4 credits
CHEM 130 Chemistry* 4 credits
CHEM 133 General Chemistry I* 4 credits
CHEM 134 General Chemistry II* 4 credits
GEOG 142 Physical Geography* 4 credits
GEOL 145 Physical Geology* 4 credits
PHYS 144 Astronomy* 4 credits
PHYS 251 Physics I AND 4 credits
PHYS 252 Physics I Lab 1 credit
PHYS 253 Physics II* AND 4 credits
PHYS 254 Physics II Lab* 1 credit
Total: 65 credits
*Course has a prerequisite

 

Scope & Sequence

Fall 1 Winter 1 Fall 2 Winter 2
ART 104 ART 170 ART 107 ART 276
ART 115 BUS 104 ART 172 ART 290
ART 116 COM 150 ART 220 GEOG 142
ENG 121 ENG 122 ART 274 PSY 101
MATH 151 HUM 101 BUS 153 SOC 120

 

Effective: Fall 2013
Current/Updated as: 10/31/16

Employment Information

Is this for me?
Students interested in graphic
design should have an eye
for design and creativity.
They must be effective
communicators in order to
be able to work with and
understand the intent of many
different clients. They should
have basic computer skills to
ready them for learning the
computer programs required
for this profession.

Graphic designers create many forms of visual communications. These include advertisements in print for newspapers, magazines, invitations, packaging, posters, billboards and corporate logos. Online graphics for use in digital media and social media on the Web have increased rapidly over the past decade.

Graphic designers are the masters of strategically integrating and arranging photos, illustrations, typefonts, shapes, color and texture to promote products, services and businesses to consumers. They may work at a newspapers, advertising agencies, public relations firms, corporations or organizations or they may be self-employed.

Often, graphic designers specialize in areas such as real estate promotion, corporate identity or packaging. Others are more versatile in the range of design work they do.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics the median annual wage of graphic designers was $43,000. The outlook for employment for those in this profession is expected to rise by 13 percent through 2020. Although there is a high level of turnover in the profession, competition for senior graphic designer positions is projected to be strong.

Employers prefer candidates with bachelor degrees in graphic design. Students and professionals in this field showcase their work and creativity through professional portfolios.


Program Information
The Associate of Arts in Visual Arts Degree with emphasis in Graphic Design is appropriate for students who want to pursue a career or further study in the fields of advertising design, graphic design, or digital design. The degree provides grounding in design fundamentals, the use of design software and
hardware, web design and advertising principles. There is additional emphasis on a broad academic base needed to inform the artistic process and lay the groundwork for further study. The degree prepares the student to transfer to a four-year college, university or art school.

Graphic designers need to be familiar with digital design software programs to mix photos, text, color and design elements to create promotional images and messages. It is important for them to keep on top of the latest in changing design trends.
school or university student holding pencil writing on paper answer sheet.sitting on lecture chair taking final exam attending in examination room or classroom.student in uniform.
Associate of General Studies
Course OverviewCourse GuideAdditional Information
 

The Associate of General Studies degree enables students to combine a broad core of basic courses with a program that can be tailored to their personal, academic, or professional goals. This degree may enhance current employment and/or fulfill the requirements for a specific college or university program. Intended as a flexible degree for students who are not pursing a specified curriculum in the transfer or professional-technical area, the degree may also be appropriate for students who are undecided about future educational or career goals. Many General Studies graduates continue their studies at a college or university in such diverse fields as literature, fine and performing arts, education, religion, human services, philosophy, political and social sciences, and sports.

(Can be completed in online format)

 

 

Communications (4 courses)

COM 110 Interpersonal Communications 3 credits
COM 150 Public Speaking* 3 credits
ENG 121 English Composition I* 3 credits
ENG 122 English Composition II* 3 credits

 

Computer Literacy

CIS 101 Introduction to Computers & Software*  4 credits

 

General Studies

GEN 102 College and Life Strategies for General Education Majors 3 credits
*Must be completed in first or second semester

 

Humanities (choose 2 courses from 2 different prefixes)

ART 100 Art Appreciation* 4 credits
ART 220 History of Art I*  4 credits
ART 221 History of Art II*  4 credits
ENG 201, 233, or 234  4 credits
HIST 101 Western Civilization I: Ancient World to 1715*  4 credits
HIST 102 Western Civilization II: Europe c. 1700 to Present*  4 credits
HUM 101 Modern Culture and the Arts*  4 credits
LNG 161, 162, 163, or 261  4 credits
MUS 150 Music Appreciation*  4 credits
PHIL 210 Ethics*  4 credits
PHIL 230 Introduction to Philosophy*  3 credits
REL 231, 232, or 233  4 credits

 

Mathematics (1 course)

MATH 117 Finite Mathematics* 4 credits
MATH 151 College Algebra* 4 credits
MATH 161 Calculus I and Analytic Geometry* 4 credits
MATH 162 Calculus II and Analytic Geometry* 4 credits
MATH 201 Introduction to Statistics* 4 credits

 

Social Science (choose 2 courses from 2 different prefixes)

ANTH 201 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology* 4 credits
ECON 203 Principles of Economics (Micro)* 4 credits
ECON 204 Principles of Economics (Macro)* 4 credits
HIST 101 Western Civilization I: Ancient World to 1715* 4 credits
HIST 102 Western Civilization II: Europe c. 1700 to Present* 4 credits
HIST 201 U.S. History I: European Colonization to 1877* 4 credits
HIST 202 U.S. History II: Reconstruction to the Present* 4 credits
HIST 204 History of Michigan* 4 credits
PSI 110 American Government and Political Science* 4 credits
PSI 111 State & Local Government* 3 credits
PSY 101 Psychology* 4 credits
PSY 201 Psychology & Personality* 3 credits
PSY 210 Human Growth & Development* 4 credits
PSY 220 Abnormal Psychology* 4 credits
PSY 250 Human Sexuality* 4 credits
PSY 260 Social Psychology* 4 credits
SOC 120 Principles of Sociology* 4 credits
SOC 121 Modern Social Problems* 4 credits
SOC 220 Marriage & Family* 4 credits

 

Natural Science (choose 2 courses from 2 different prefixes – 1 must have a lab)

BIO 110 Biological Form and Function*  3 credits
BIO 120 Biology*  4 credits
BIO 121 General Biology I*  4 credits
BIO 122 General Biology II*  4 credits
BIO 125 Environment and Society*  3 credits
BIO 201 Ecology*  4 credits
BIO 210 Anatomy & Physiology I*  4 credits
BIO 211 Anatomy & Physiology II*  4 credits
BIO 212 Pathophysiology*  4 credits
BIO 220 General Genetics*  3 credits
BIO 230 Microbiology*  4 credits
CHEM 130 Chemistry*  4 credits
CHEM 133 General Chemistry I*  4 credits
CHEM 134 General Chemistry II*  4 credits
GEOG 142 Physical Geography*  4 credits
GEOL 145 Physical Geology*  4 credits
PHYS 144 Astronomy*  4 credits
PHYS 251 Physics I* AND  4 credits
PHYS 252 Physics I Lab*  1 credits
PHYS 253 Physics II* AND  4 credits
PHYS 254 Physics II Lab*  1 credits

 

Elective courses as needed to total a minimum of 60 credit hours

Total: 60 credits
*Course has a prerequisite

 

Effective: Fall 2016
Current as: 3/15/16

 

 

Degree Information

Adult Students

The General Studies degree
offers non-traditional students
an opportunity to meet their
educational goals along with
their busy lifestyles. The
program is designed with
flexibility in mind and may
include day, evening and/or
online classes.

Over the course of the last four
years GOCC graduates have
transferred to 64 different
colleges and universities.

The Associate of General Studies degree allows students to combine a broad core of basic courses with a program tailored to their personal, academic or professional goals. This degree may enhance current employment and/or fulfill the requirements to transfer to a specific college or university program. Intended as a flexible degree for students who are not pursing a specified curriculum in the transfer or professional-technical area, the degree may also be appropriate for students who are undecided about future educational or career goals. Many General Studies graduates continue their studies at a college or university in such diverse fields as literature, fine and performing arts, education, religion, human services, philosophy, political and social sciences and sports.

Transfer agreements between Glen Oaks and other colleges and universities make it possible for students to start their education programs at Glen Oaks and be assured they can earn specialized or advanced degrees at transfer institutions, without loss of time or credit. Students planning to obtain four-year degrees have the advantage of a community college “start.”

The advisors in Student Services will coordinate your transfer plans with the latest information from your target transfer institution. Glen Oaks advisors have access to joint-transfer agreements with various colleges and institutions. The advisors work closely with colleges, receive program information, communicate on a regular basis and attend workshops and seminars at the institutions. It is also wise to discuss these plans with your transfer school.


Current High School Students
To prepare for your first semester of college courses, the college recommends that you complete college preparatory classes provided at many schools. Check with your high school counselor for high school graduation requirements and possible articulation agreements. Courses might include English, mathematics, general science or lab science, basic keyboarding, introduction to computers, history, physical education, foreign language, psychology, sociology and/or geography.

 

Shot of a group of unrecognisable medical practitioners joining their hands together in unity
Associate of Applied Science in Allied Health
Course OverviewCourse GuideAdditional InformationAdmissions Process
The purpose of this degree is to prepare the student for increased job responsibilities, supervisory roles and healthcare office management in physician offices, health care clinics, hospital-based clinics, hospitals and small healthcare businesses.

Allied Health (3 credit hours)

ALH 218 Medical Terminology 3 credits

 

English (6 credit hours)

ENG 121 English Composition I 3 credits
ENG 122 English Composition II* 3 credits

 

Social Sciences (8 credit hours)

PSY 101 Psychology 4 credits
PSY 210 Human Growth & Development 4 credits

 

Biology (12 credit hours required)

BIO 101- Human Biology* 4 credits
BIO 210- Anatomy & Physiology I* 4 credits
BIO 211-Anatomy & Physiology II* 4 credits

 

Recommended Specialty Areas: (Choose 8 or 9 credits)

Business (4-6 credit hours required)
ACCT 100 Fundamentals of Accounting 4 credits
ACCT 109 Payroll Accounting* 2 credits
BUS 104 Introduction to Business 3 credits
BUS 105 Business Mathematical Applications* 3 credits
BUS 260 Small Business Management* 3 credits
Clinical (6 credit hours required)
ALH 103 Nutrition* 3 credits
ALH 104 Nurse Aide 6 credits
ALH 205 Pharmacology for Health Occupations 3 credits
ALH 222 Disease Conditions 3 credits
ALH 230 Medical Office Lab 4 credits
ALH 235 MA Clinical I 3 credits
ALH 236 MA Clinical II 3 credits
ALH 250 Medical Law & Bioethics 3 credits
Technology (8 credits required)
CIS 100 Using the Internet 1 credits
CIS 101 Introduction to Computers & Software* 4 credits
CIS 214 Present Graphics/Publishing 3 credits
CIS 220 Computer Tech Essentials 3 credits
224 Computer Repair Essentials 3 credits
CIS 227 Concepts of Spreadsheets* 2 credits
CIS 233 Concepts of Word* 2 credits
Total: 30 credits
*Course has a prerequisite

 

To be granted an Associate of Applied Science in Allied Health Degree the student must complete one of the following Allied Health Certificates for a minimum of 30 credits:

Coding Specialist – Physician Based
Health Care Worker
Medical Administrative Specialist
Medical Assistant
Phlebotomy Technician (Must take additional credit hours to fulfill the 30 credit hour minimum for certificate requirements)
Practical Nursing (LPN)

 

Total Hours Required: 60 credits

 

Effective: Fall 2018

Employment Information

Outlook

According to the U.S. Department
of Labor, employment of healthcare
occupations is projected to grow
19 percent from 2014 to 2024, much
faster than the average for all
occupations, adding about 2.3
million new jobs. Healthcare
occupations will add more jobs than
any other group of occupations.
This growth is expected due to an
aging population and because federal
health insurance reform should
increase the number of individuals
who have access to health insurance.

Health care careers offer job stability, often above average financial reward, and the opportunity to join one of the most exciting and fastest growing fields in the United States. In the coming years, with an aging baby boomer population, there are expected to be more jobs than there are health care professionals to fill them.

Job duties range greatly depending upon the chosen area of specialization. Medical assistants complete administrative and clinical tasks in the offices of physicians, hospitals, and other healthcare facilities. Their duties vary with the location, specialty, and size of the practice. Medical records and health information technicians, commonly referred to as health information technicians, organize and manage health information data by ensuring that it maintains its quality, accuracy, accessibility, and security in both paper files and electronic systems.

Healthcare support occupations (such as home health aides, occupational therapy assistants, and medical transcriptionists) had a median annual wage of $27,040 in May 2015, lower than the median annual wage for all occupations in the economy. Those with an Associate of Applied Science in Allied Health and one or more occupational (medical-related) certificates can expect to earn between $30,000 to $40,000 and possibly more depending on additional training and responsibilities.


Program Information

This degree prepares the student for increased job responsibilities, supervisory roles and health care office management in physician offices, health care clinics, hospital-based clinics, hospitals and small health care businesses.

Is this for me?

Allied health professionals should possess good communication skills and enjoy working with people. They typically have an interest in science and must be able to utilize computer software programs. Additionally they must be a “hands-on” person with good eye/hand coordination.

To be granted the AASAH the student must obtain one of the following Occupational Certificates (averaging 30 credits):
Health Care Worker
Coding Specialist/Physician-Based
Medical Administrative Specialist
Medical Assistant
Phlebotomy Technician
Practical Nurse (LPN)
Guided Pathway

 

  1. Register for admission to the college.
  2. Meet Placement Evaluation in basic Reading, Math and English criteria:
    1. Placement into BUS 111 Contemporary Business and Technical Communications or higher or meet Corresponding ACT/SAT scores.
    2. Placement into MATH 100 Introductory Algebra or higher or meet Corresponding ACT/SAT scores.
      If course placement criteria not met, student may enroll in appropriate remedial course/s to bring skill level up to criteria.
  3. Declare interest in completing the Associate of Applied Science in Allied Health; (by filling out application and returning it to the Director of Allied Health/Medical Assisting).
  4. 4) To be granted an Associate of Applied Science in Allied Health Degree the student must complete one of the following Allied Health Certificates for a minimum of 30 credits:
    1. Coding Specialist – Physician Based
    2. Health Care Worker
    3. Medical Administrative Specialist
    4. Medical Assistant
    5. Phlebotomy Technician (Must take additional credit hours to fulfill the 30 credit hour minimum for certificate requirements.)
    6. Practical Nursing (LPN)
  5. Declare specialty area of Business or Clinical or Technology and complete 4 – 6 credits from that one area.
  6. Meet with the Director of Allied Health to Interview and plan a Guided Pathway for successful completion of the program.
  7. The Associate of Applied Science in Allied Health Degree may be completed, as outlined below, in three semesters beginning in the fall. However, students may start the program in either the fall or the winter semester. A student may choose to take courses over a longer period of time.
  8. Suggested Course Rotation: (minimum of a 2.5 GPA required at all times – with no grade lower than a 2.0)
    SEMESTER ONE:

    1. ALH 218 Medical Terminology (Placement beyond or satisfactory completion of ENG 063 and ENG 073)
    2. BIO 101 Human Biology I (Prerequisite: ALH 218 Medical Terminology or take concurrently)
    3. ENG 121 English Composition I (Prerequisite: Appropriate placement based on assessment (ACT, SAT, or placement) or successful completion of ENG 073 or ENT 074. For special sections which include a lab requirement, a writing sample is required.)
    4. PSY 101 Psychology (Prerequisite: ENG 121 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 121)

     

    SEMESTER TWO:

    1. BIO 210 Human Anatomy & Physiology I (Prerequisite: Successful completion (grade 2.0 or better) of BIO 121 General Biology I or concurrent/completion of BIO 101 (Pre-nursing students should take BIO 101 rather than BIO 121)
    2. ENG 122 English Composition II (Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 121 with a 2.0 or better)
    3. PSY 210 Human Growth & Development (Prerequisite: PSY 101, ENG 121 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 121)
    4. Course from a declared Specialty Area (Business, Clinical, or Technical)

     

    SEMESTER THREE:

    1. BIO 211 Anatomy & Physiology II (Prerequisite: Successful completion (grade 2.0 or better) of BIO 210 Human Anatomy and Physiology I)
    2. 2nd course from your declared Specialty Area (Business, Clinical, or Technical)
    3. Evaluation for 60+ credits and if needed take additional courses from the specialty areas
  9. Apply for graduation certificates and/or degrees in the Student Services Department. May also print the form online.
Health visitor and a senior woman during home visit. A nurse or a doctor examining a woman.
Associate of Applied Science in Nursing
Course OverviewCourse GuideAdditional Information
 

The Associate of Applied Science in Nursing Degree qualifies the graduate to sit for the National Council Licensing Examination (NCLEX) in Nursing at the RN level. When the graduate successfully passes the examination, the nursing graduate will be licensed as a Registered Nurse. RNs are employed in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, surgical centers, insurance companies, rehabilitation facilities, resorts, cruise ships, nursing homes, the military and community and public health agencies. Many go on to universities and colleges to earn a Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree (BSN) and Master of Science in Nursing Degree (MSN) or Nurse Practitioner (NP).

 

 

English Composition (may be taken before semester listed) 3 credits
Nursing 47 credits
Allied Health (may be taken before semester listed) 3 credits
Total: 53 credits

 

All NUR courses must be completed during the semester listed
 

Course Sequence Level I Practical Nurse Certificate

Spring Semester
NUR 104 Fundamentals of Nursing 5 credits
NUR 109 Pharmacology I 2 credits
Fall Semester
ALH 103 Nutrition (can be taken early) 3 credits
NUR 111 Medical/Surgical Nursing I 6 credits
NUR 119 Pharmacology II 2 credits
NUR 131 Pediatric Nursing 3 credits
Winter Semester
NUR 112 Medical/Surgical Nursing II  7 credits
NUR 129 Pharmacology III  2 credits
NUR 130 Maternity Nursing 3 credits
 Total:  33 credits

 

NOTE – Prerequisites are required prior to admission to Level I and are listed below:

  1. Completion with a grade of 2.5 (C+) or better each credit for the following courses:
    • High school chemistry (2 semesters/1 credit) or its equivalent, for example, CHEM 130 within the last 5 years.
    • ALH 218 Medical Terminology*
    • ENG 121 English Composition I*
    • BIO 210 Human Anatomy and Physiology I*
    • BIO 211 Human Anatomy and Physiology II*
    • PSY 210 Human Growth & Development*
  2. Minimal score of achievement at the 65th percentile on the pre-entrance examination.
  3. Placement in MATH 104 Intermediate Algebra or higher on Accuplacer Placement Test

 

Course Sequence Level II Associate of Applied Science in Nursing Degree

Spring Semester
NUR 220 Nursing Role Transition 2 credits
Fall Semester
NUR 213 Complex Parent-Child Nursing  4 credits
NUR 215 Complex Medical/Surgical Nursing  4 credits
Winter Semester
ENG 122 English Composition* (can be taken early) 3 credits
NUR 201 Health Care Ethics 2 credits
NUR 214 Community Mental Health Nursing 3 credits
NUR 216 Leadership in Nursing 2 credits
Total: 20 credits
*Course has a prerequisite

 

Admission requirements for all students:

  • Submit to the Nursing Office a formal typed letter indicating a desire for admission to Level II
  • Submit a completed nursing application for Level II to the nursing office
  • Obtain a minimum decision score of 75% on the Kaplan Entrance test

 

Admission requirement for currently enrolled Level I students:

  • Successful completion of the Level I Program, and passing the NCLEX-PN Examination, resulting in Michigan licensure as a Practical Nurse, during the 1st semester of the Level II program.

 

Additional admission requirements for current Licensed Practical Nurses:

  • Submit a letter indicating you have a minimum of 540 hours of employment as an LPN within the past year from your employer and two (2) references; one from your Director of Nursing and one from your nurse supervisor which speaks to your professionalism and clinical competence. (Individuals who do not meet the employment requirements may meet with the Director of Nursing to discuss options)
  • Submit a copy of your current Michigan LPN license

 

Nursing Program Requirements:

  • Students may not enroll in nursing (NUR) courses unless they have been accepted into the nursing program by the Director of Nursing.
  • Students accepted into the nursing program must receive a grade of 2.5 or higher in each required course taken in the nursing curriculum if they are to progress.
  • Students who receive final grades of less than 2.5 in a course will not be allowed to progress until they have made up their deficiencies. This will be accomplished by repeating the course involved and achieving at least a 2.5 final grade in the repeated course. If a student fails the same course twice (receives a final grade of less than 2.5), they are dismissed from the program and shall not be readmitted. Any student who leaves the program for any reason is not guaranteed readmission.

 

Effective: Spring 2006; revised 10/31/05; revised 3/14/11;
revised 4/19/12; revised 11/13/14

 

Employment Information

Outlook

Overall, job opportunities for
registered nurses are expected
to be good, according to the
Department of Labor statistics.
Demand for healthcare services
will increase because of the
aging population, given that
older people typically have
more medical problems than
younger people. Nurses also will
be needed to educate and care
for clients with various chronic
conditions, such as arthritis,
dementia, diabetes, and obesity.

Registered nurses (RNs) provide and coordinate client care, educate clients and the public about various health conditions, and provide advice and emotional support to clients and their family members.

Duties of registered nurses include:

  • Record clients’ medical histories and symptoms
  • Administer clients’ medicines and treatments
  • Set up plans for clients’ care or contribute to existing plans
  • Observe clients and record the observations
  • Consult and collaborate with doctors and other healthcare professionals
  • Operate and monitor medical equipment
  • Help perform diagnostic tests and analyze the results
  • Teach clients and their families how to manage illnesses or injuries
  • Explain what to do at home after treatment

Registered nurses’ duties and titles often depend on where they work and the clients they work with. For example, an oncology nurse may work with cancer clients or a geriatric nurse may work with elderly clients. Some registered nurses combine one or more areas of practice. For example, a pediatric oncology nurse works with children and teens who have cancer.


Nursing at GOCC
GOCC offers both the Certificate of Practical Nursing and Registered Nursing education programs (Laddered programs). Students can enter Level I and Level II nursing programs based upon a competition for available seats.

Students must successfully complete either the Level I program and/or the Level II Associate Degree in Nursing program to become eligible to complete the nationwide NCLEX exam to obtain a state-issues nursing license.

Following licensure, nurses can find employment opportunities in a multitude of nursing specialties ranging from critical nursing care, flight nursing, long-term care nursing, rehabilitation centers, the military and more. Some nurses choose to join travel agencies where they can accept a different geographical location every 13 weeks. Many nurses are being mandated to pursue their bachelor’s in nursing and/or advanced nursing degrees.

Glen Oaks Community College is looking forward to becoming ACEN accredited in the future. Our nursing program is presently fully approved by the Michigan Board of Nursing.

 

Artists working together
Associate of Arts in Visual Arts Emphasis in Fine Art
Course OverviewCourse GuideAdditional Information
 

The Associate of Arts in Visual Arts Degree with emphasis in Fine Art enables students to pursue a career or interest in Fine Art. The degree provides grounding in art fundamentals and allows specialization in areas of particular interest. There is additional emphasis on a broad academic base needed to inform the artistic process and lay the groundwork for further study. The degree prepares the student to transfer to a four-year college, university or art school.

 

 

Art Studio Requirements (12 credit hours)

ART 104 Object Drawing 3 credits
ART 105 Drawing and Creativity 3 credits
ART 107 Two Dimensional Design 3 credits
ART 108 Three Dimensional Design 3 credits
ART 274 Typography* 3 credits
ART 276 Advertising Design* 3 credits

 

Art Studio Electives (Choose 9 credit hours)

ART 210 Life Drawing* 3 credits
ART 240 Painting 3 credits
ART ELECTIVE (200 level course) 3 credits

 

Capstone Course (2 required credit hours)

ART 290 Portfolio* 2 credits

 

History of Art (8 required credit hours)

ART 220 History of Art I* 4 credits
ART 221 History of Art II* 4 credits

 

Communications (9 credit hours)

COM 150 Public Speaking 3 credits
ENG 121 English Composition I* 3 credits
ENG 122 English Composition II* 3 credits

 

Humanities (choose 4 credit hours)

HIST 101 Western Civilization I: Ancient World to 1715* 4 credits

 

Mathematics (choose 4 credit hours)

MATH 151 College Algebra* 4 credits

 

Social Science (choose 8 credit hours from 2 different prefixes)

PSY 101 Psychology* 4 credits
SOC 120 Principles of Sociology* 4 credits

 

Natural Science (choose 4 credit hours with labs)

BIO 121 General Biology I* 4 credits
Total: 60 credits
*Course has a prerequisite

 

Scope & Sequence

Fall 1 Winter 1 Fall 2 Winter 2
ART 104 ART 105 ART 220 *ART 210
ART 107 ART 108 ART 240 ART 221
*ENG 121 COM 150 *PSY 101 *ART 200 level elective
*MATH 151 *ENG 122 *SOC 120 *ART 290
 *HIST 101  *BIO 121

*Course has prerequisite
Effective: Fall 2013
Current as: 12/15/2016

 

 

Employment Information

Degree Information

The Associate of Arts in Visual
Arts Degree with emphasis in
Fine Art enables students to
pursue a career or interest in
Fine Art. The degree provides
grounding in art fundamentals
and allows specialization in areas
of particular interest. There is
additional emphasis on a broad
academic base needed to inform
the artistic process and lay the
groundwork for further study.
The degree prepares the student
to transfer to a four-year college,
university or art school

Artists use a variety of different mediums to create works of art for appreciation, exhibition and sale, or for commission. In addition to paintings, prints and drawings, artworks are formed from a broad range of media including pottery, glassware, textiles, sculptures, wood, jewelry and much more. The possibilities are limitless.

This major is the starting block for students wishing to pursue art education or post-secondary art education, or for those entering the fields of architecture and art illustration.

Typically, craft and fine artists are self-employed, and they often hold other jobs on the side. There are a range of related careers in fine arts such as artist assistants, archivists and exhibition designers. In addition to studios, the artist’s place of work can include art and craft fairs, art museums, galleries, auction houses, etc.

Although formal training is not required, those who earn a Bachelor or Master in Fine Arts, can improve their skills and job prospects according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The BLS reports that the median hourly wage of craft and fine artists is $20.90 based on the most recent information provided.

The profession is expected to grow by five percent through 2020, and is greatly affected by the economy, as art purchases are optional.


Is this for me?
Artists have an imagination and passion for creativity. They have an eye for beauty and express their feelings through their work. Once created, their broader success lies in getting their work noticed through those who can help them promote their artwork to collectors and people who work in galleries. However, not all artists have their work in galleries. Artists may create artwork for advertising, textbooks, graphic design, and the web.

 

Subject: A woman photographer in action with her camera and lighting equipment, a small business photography studio.
Associate of Arts in Visual Arts Emphasis in Commercial Photography
Course OverviewCourse GuideAdditional Information
 

The Associate of Arts in Visual Arts Degree with emphasis in Commercial Photography enables students to pursue a career or interest in Photography. The degree provides knowledge of the photographic process from creation to the output of the image. The degree provides practical experience in product, portrait, and location photography. There is additional emphasis on a broad academic base needed to inform the artistic process and lay the groundwork for further study. The degree prepares the student to transfer to a four year college, university, art school or to begin work in the field of commercial photography.

 

 

Art Studio Requirements (12 credit hours)

ART 107 Two Dimensional Design  3 credits
ART 160 Basic Photography  3 credits
ART 170 Image Manipulation: Photoshop  3 credits
ART 260 Advanced Photography*  3 credits

 

Art Studio Electives (Choose 9 credit hours)

ART 104 Object Drawing 3 credits
ART 105 Drawing and Creativity  3 credits
ART 108 Three Dimensional Design  3 credits
ART 115 Introduction to Graphic Design  3 credits
ART 116 Color for Graphic Design  3 credits
ART 172 Digital Illustration*  3 credits
ART 210 Life Drawing*  3 credits
ART 231 Sculpture*  3 credits
ART 240 Painting  3 credits
ART 241 Printmaking: Intaglio and Relief  3 credits
ART 242 Watercolor I  3 credits
ART 243 Watercolor II*  3 credits
ART 244 Oil Painting I  3 credits
ART 245 Oil Painting II*  3 credits
ART 246 Printmaking: Silk Screen  3 credits
ART 252 Pastel I  3 credits
ART 253 Pastel II*  3 credits
ART 274 Typography*  3 credits
ART 276 Advertising Design  3 credits

 

Capstone Course (2 required credit hours)

 ART 290 Portfolio*  2 credits

 

History of Art (8 required credit hours)

ART 220 History of Art I* 4 credits
ART 221 History of Art II* 4 credits

 

Communications (6 credit hours)

COM 140 Speech 3 credits
OR
COM 150 Public Speaking 3 credits
ENG 121 English Composition I* 3 credits
ENG 122 English Composition II* 3 credits

 

Computer Literacy (4 credits hours required)

CIS 101 Introduction to Computers & Software 4 credits

 

Humanities (choose 4 credit hours)

ENG 201, 233 or 234 Literature Classes* 4 credits
HIST 101 Western Civilization I: Ancient World to 1715* 4 credits
HIST 102 Western Civilization II: Europe c. 1700 to Present* 4 credits
HUM 101 Modern Culture and the Arts* 4 credits
HUM 234 World Mythologies 4 credits
LNG 161, 162, 163 or 261 4 credits
MUS 150 Music Appreciation* 4 credits
PHIL 210 Ethics* 4 credits
PHIL 230 Introduction to Philosophy* 3 credits
REL 231, 232 or 233 4 credits

 

Mathematics (choose 4 credit hours)

MATH 104 Intermediate Algebra* 4 credits
MATH 105 Fundamentals of Modern Math* 4 credits
MATH 117 Finite Mathematics* 4 credits
MATH 151 College Algebra* 4 credits
MATH 161 Calculus I and Analytic Geometry* 4 credits
MATH 162 Calculus II and Analytic Geometry* 4 credits
MATH 201 Introduction to Statistics* 3 credits

 

Social Science (choose 8 credit hours from 2 different prefixes)

ANTH 201 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology* 4 credits
ECON 203 Principles of Economics (Micro)* 4 credits
ECON 204 Principles of Economics (Macro)* 4 credits
HIST 101 Western Civilization I: Ancient World to 1715* 4 credits
HIST 102 Western Civilization II: Europe c. 1700 to Present* 4 credits
HIST 201 U.S. History I: European Colonization to 1877* 4 credits
HIST 202 U.S. History II: Reconstruction to the Present* 4 credits
HIST 204 History of Michigan* 4 credits
PSI 110 American Government & Political Science* 4 credits
PSI 111 State and Local Government* 3 credits
PSY 101 Psychology* 4 credits
PSY 201 Psychology & Personality* 3 credits
PSY 210 Human Growth & Development* 4 credits
PSY 220 Abnormal Psychology* 4 credits
PSY 250 Human Sexuality* 4 credits
PSY 260 Social Psychology* 4 credits
SOC 120 Principles of Sociology* 4 credits
SOC 121 Modern Social Problems* 4 credits
SOC 220 Marriage & Family* 4 credits

 

Natural Science (choose 4 credit hours with labs)

BIO 120 Biology* 4 credits
BIO 121 General Biology I* 4 credits
BIO 122 General Biology II* 4 credits
BIO 125 Environment and Society* 3 credits
BIO 201 Ecology* 4 credits
BIO 210 Anatomy & Physiology I* 4 credits
BIO 211 Anatomy & Physiology II* 4 credits
BIO 212 Pathophysiology* 4 credits
BIO 230 Microbiology* 4 credits
CHEM 130 Chemistry* 4 credits
CHEM 133 General Chemistry I* 4 credits
CHEM 134 General Chemistry II* 4 credits
GEOG 142 Physical Geography* 4 credits
GEOL 145 Physical Geology* 4 credits
PHYS 144 Astronomy* 4 credits
PHYS 251 Physics I* AND 4 credits
PHYS 252 Physics I Lab* 1 credit
PHYS 253 Physics II* AND 4 credits
PHYS 254 Physics II Lab* 1 credit
Total: 64 credits
*Course has a prerequisite

Effective: Fall 2013
Current/Updated as: 3/17/16

 

 

Employment Information

Is this for me?
Photographers have an interest
and eye for design. They must
be effective communicators in
order to be able to work with
and understand the intent of
many different clients. They
work in different environments
and are masters of the technical
tools and techniques available
to them to meet the deadlines
and demands of the clients.

 

You don’t take a
photograph, you make it.Ansel Adams

Commercial photographers combine today’s technological tools with creativity to produce compelling images that promote a business or sell a product or service. Commercial photographers may be employed in large corporations, newspapers or smaller businesses such as advertising agencies or public relations firms.

Trained in digital imaging and editing, commercial photographers enhance and alter images through an array of software programs. They combine photos with text and other design elements to create the final image. They may work in a studio or at client locations.

In 2010, over 60 percent of photographers were self-employed. Those who own their own business need to have entrepreneurial skills to manage the business and sharp marketing skills to be able to promote their work and business.

There exists a broader range of demand for promotional photographs today than ever before. Advertisements may be produced for newspaper, magazines, television or billboards, as as well as for websites and online usage.

According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, over 57,000 photographers were employed in the U.S. The average mean salary was $36,370 for the year.


Commercial Photography at Glen Oaks
The Associate of Arts in Visual Arts Degree with emphasis in Commercial Photography enables students to pursue a career or interest in photography. The degree provides knowledge of the photographic process from creation to the output of the image. The degree provides practical experience in product, portrait, and location photography. There is additional emphasis on a broad academic base needed to inform the artistic process and lay the groundwork for further study. The degree prepares the student to transfer to a four-year college, university, art school or to begin work in the field of commercial photography.
 

Cute woman sketching city and graph icons and symbols
Associate of Arts
Course OverviewCourse GuideAdditional Information
 

The Associate of Arts degree is designed for students who desire a rigorous liberal arts education that emphasizes depth of intellectual and academic experience. This degree is designed for students whose educational interests are in the humanities, the creative and performing arts, and the social sciences. The degree can provide the basis for career advancement or for further study. Because transfer credit and degree requirements vary widely, it is important to consult with an advisor if you plan to transfer to a college or university.

 

 

Communications (9 required credit hours)

COM 150 Public Speaking* 3 credits
ENG 121 English Composition I* 3 credits
ENG 122 English Composition II* 3 credits

 

Humanities (8 required credit hours)
One (1) literature course from the following 3 courses must be taken:

ENG 201, 233, or 234 4 credits
AND the following course must be taken:
HUM 101 Modern Culture and the Arts* 4 credits

 

Social Science (16 required credit hours)
The following courses must be taken:

ANTH 201 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology*  4 credits
HIST 201 U.S. History I: European Colonization to 1877*  4 credits
HIST 202 U.S. History II: Reconstruction to the Present*  4 credits
AND
PSY 101 Psychology* or SOC 120 Principles of Sociology*  4 credits

 

Natural Science (12 required credit hours)
8 credit hours of science must be taken in courses with the same prefix.
Select the 8 credit hours from the following sciences:

BIO 121 General Biology I* AND BIO 122 General Biology II* 8 credits
OR
CHEM 133 General Chemistry I* AND CHEM 134 General Chemistry II* 8 credits
OR
PHYS 251 Physics I* AND PHYS 252 Physics I Lab*
AND
PHYS 253 Physics II* AND PHYS 254 Physics II Lab* 10 credits

 

One (1) Mathematics course from the following 6 courses must be taken:

MATH 105 Mathematical Concepts for Elementary Teachers* 4 credits
MATH 117 Finite Mathematics*  4 credits
MATH 151 College Algebra*  4 credits
MATH 161 Calculus I and Analytic Geometry*  4 credits
MATH 162 Calculus II and Analytic Geometry*  4 credits
MATH 201 Introduction to Statistics*  4 credits

 

Elective Courses (17 credit hours)
Select any 17 hours from the following courses:

ART 104–253 3 credits
Note specific course prerequisites for studio courses selected
ART 100 Art Appreciation*  4 credits
ART 160, 260 Photography courses*  3 credits
ART 220 History of Art I*  4 credits
ART 221 History of Art II* 4 credits
BIO 120 Biology*  4 credits
BIO 125 Environment and Society*  3 credits
BIO 201 Ecology*  4 credits
BIO 210 Anatomy & Physiology I*  4 credits
BIO 211 Anatomy & Physiology II*  4 credits
BIO 212 Pathophysiology*  4 credits
BIO 230 Microbiology*  4 credits
CHEM 130 Chemistry*  4 credits
CIS 101 Introduction to Computers & Software*  4 credits
CIS 117 Visual Basic Programming for Microcomputers*  3 credits
COM 110 Interpersonal Communications*  3 credits
COM 140 General Communications: Speech*  3 credits
ECON 203 Principles of Economics (Micro)*  4 credits
ECON 204 Principles of Economics (Macro)*  4 credits
ENG 201, 233, or 234  4 credits
ENG 126 Introduction to Creative Writing*  3 credits
GEOG 142 Physical Geography*  4 credits
GEOL 145 Physical Geology*  4 credits
HIST 101 Western Civilization I: Ancient World to 1715*  4 credits
HIST 102 Western Civilization II: Europe c. 1700 to Present*  4 credits
LNG 161, 162, 163, or 261  4 credits
MUS 150 Music Appreciation*  4 credits
PHED 106 Wellness and Life Style*  2 credits
PHIL 210 Ethics*  4 credits
PHIL 230 Introduction to Philosophy*  3 credits
PHYS 144 Astronomy*  4 credits
PSI 110 American Government and Political Science*  4 credits
PSY 201 Psychology and Personality*  3 credits
PSY 210 Human Growth & Development*  4 credits
PSY 220 Abnormal Psychology*  4 credits
PSY 250 Human Sexuality*  4 credits
PSY 260 Social Psychology*  4 credits
REL 231, 232, or 233  4 credits
SOC 121 Modern Social Problems*  4 credits
SOC 220 Marriage and Family*  4 credits
Total: 62 Credits
*Course has a prerequisite

 

NOTE: No courses under the 100 level will be accepted toward this degree.

NOTE: Anyone beginning the Associate of Arts Degree at Glen Oaks in the Fall, 1990 or later must complete MACRAO requirements in order to qualify for the degree.

Effective: Fall 2011
Current/Updated: 3/17/16

 

 

What can I do with my degree?

Degree Information

The Associate of Arts (AA)
degree is designed for students
desiring a rigorous liberal arts
education that emphasizes depth
of intellectual and academic
experience. The 62-credit degree
is designed for students whose
educational interests are in the
humanities, the creative and
performing arts, and the social
sciences. The degree provides
the basis for career advancement
or for further study. Because
transfer credit and degree
requirements vary widely, it is
important to consult with an
advisor to assure credits will
transfer to the desired program at
the transfer school.

Approximately half the students seeking a higher education in America enroll in community colleges or technical institutes. More than 70 percent of all college freshmen take community college classes in order to complete the “core courses” required in your first two years at a university. By doing so, students save in tuition costs, while enjoying smaller class sizes and attentive instructors.

The Associate of Arts degree is typically pursued when transfer to a college or university is likely. For those achieving an Associate of Arts or other transfer degree programs, Glen Oaks Community College has “articulation” and “joint transfer” agreements with area colleges in a number of programs. GOCC advisors can help students understand a target university’s requirements and choose courses that will transfer.

However, students don’t have to participate in an articulation agreement to make a successful transfer. As long as one researches the requirements, plans ahead and meets with a GOCC advisor to discuss academic and career plans, one can transfer to just about any college in the country. In fact, GOCC graduates have successfully transferred their courses to over 54 colleges and universities since 2008.


Transfer Advising

GOCC offers courses which are helpful toward the achievement of many college and university programs of study. Frequently, students secure an associate degree on the way to their bachelor’s degree. Transfer curriculum guides are available for the most popular programs and for many colleges. Transfer guides, which list courses at GOCC that will transfer to a particular school in a specific major, are available in Student Services.

Regular Advising Appointments

The College recommends regular advising appointments to assure the best possible transfer of credits. Completion of core courses at GOCC for this degree qualifies students for the MACRAO Agreement (See GOCC catalog). The MACRAO Agreement is generally not available to students seeking the Associate of Applied Science in Business, Allied Health, Nursing, Social Work or Technology.

GOCC students have the advantage of a community college “start” before going to a college or university. GOCC advisors have curriculum guides listing courses that transfer for many specific programs and work closely with four-year institutions to stay current on transfer information which can impact GOCC students.

 

Tractor spraying pesticides on vegetable field with sprayer at spring
Associate of Applied Science in Agricultural Operations – MSU Concentration
Course OverviewCourse Guide
Students seeking an Associates of Applied Science in Agricultural Operations – MSU can move directly in the workforce or continue on to further studies in Agricultural Operations. Students will take courses from Glen Oaks and Michigan State University College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) emphasizing fundamentals in farm and crop management. Students will study in such fields as soil and water usage, plant nutrients, crop disease and pest management, natural resource and land management, emerging technologies, and regulations. Students are required to meet with advisors from Glen Oaks and MSU on course selection.

Glen Oaks Requirements

 ENG 121 English Composition  3 credits
 ENG 122 English Composition  3 credits
 COM 110 Interpersonal Communication  3 credits
OR
 COM 150 Public Speaking  3 credits
 Humanities (choose 3-4 credit hours)  3-4 credits
 MATH 104 or higher  3-4 credits
 Social Science (choose 3-4 credit hours)  3-4 credits
 CHEM 133 General Chemistry I  4 credits
 CIS 101 Introduction to Computers and Software  4 credits
 BIO 122 General Biology II  4 credits
Glen Oaks Courses: 30/33 Credits

 

MSU CANR Requirements

ABM 130 Farm Management I 3 credits
AE 131 Water Resource Protection and Mgmt 3 credits
AE 143 Application of Precision Agriculture Technologies 3 credits
AT 202 Agricultural Regulation, Compliance and Safety Course 3 credits
AT 293 Professional Internship in Agricultural Technology 3 credits
CSS 101 Introduction to Crop Science 3 credits
CSS 105 Agricultural Industries Seminar 1 credits
CSS 135 Crop Scouting and Investigations* 2 credits
CSS 143 Applied Soil Science 3 credits
ENT 110 Applied Entomology of Economic Plants 3 credits
PLP 105 Fundamentals of Applied Plant Pathology 2 credits
A minimum of 4 additional CANR credits must be completed with approval from the Program Coordinator
MSU Courses: 33 credits
Total Minimum Credit Hours: 63-66 credits
*Course has a prerequisite

 

Effective:  Fall 2017

 

Scope & Sequence:

Fall 1 Winter 1
ENG 121 ENG 122
MATH 104 or higher Social Science
COM 110 or 150 CHEM 133
CIS 101 BIO 122
 Humanities