marketing strategy Concept. Chart with keywords and icons. The meeting at the white office table
Management/Marketing Certificate
Program OverviewCourse GuideAdditional Information
The Management/Marketing Certificate will prepare the student for entry-level positions in marketing for all types of businesses. The program will familiarize the student with the skills needed for understanding the effects of marketing on an organization. Areas of study will include advertising, promotions, market research, retailing, and forecasting. Completion of this certificate can prepare students for industry-wide certification. The Management/Marketing Certificate can also be used toward an Associate of Applied Science in Business Degree.

Required Coursework

ACCT 100 Fundamentals of Accounting 4 credits
ACCT 111 Principles of Accounting I* 4 credits
BUS 153 Advertising 3 credits
BUS 250 Principles of Marketing 3 credits
BUS Electives with “ACCT” or “BUS” prefix 7 credits
BUS 282 Marketing Practicum – AMA certification attainable 4 credits
Total: 25-26 credits
*Course has a prerequisite(s)
**Course is optional

 

Effective: Fall 2011
Current/Updated: 3/17/16

Employment Information

Is this for me?
Consider a career as a marketing
manager if you are creative,
outgoing, friendly, communicate
well, attentive to detail, and
skilled in computer use, budgeting,
negotiating, and long-term planning.

Marketing managers oversee the promotion of a business or product. They create, execute and evaluate advertising campaigns over multiple channels, develop strategies to publicize new products, listen to customer feedback, and report to upper management. They build relationships with media, vendors, employees and clients to ensure their company is presented in the best light possible.

While traditional communication skills are important for this field, digital marketing skills such as search engine optimization, analytics and staying up to date on social media are increasingly important.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook, the 2016 median salary for marketing managers was $131,180 per year.


Glen Oaks Program
The Management/Marketing Certificate prepares students for entry-level positions in marketing for all types of businesses, by familiarizing them with the skills needed for understanding the effects of marketing on an organization. Areas of study include advertising, promotions, market research, retailing, and forecasting. Completion of this certificate can prepare students for industry-wide certification. The Management/Marketing Certificate can also be used toward an Associate of Applied Science in Business Degree.

Outlook
According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Handbook, the overall employment of advertising, promotions, and marketing managers is projected to grow nine percent from 2016 to 2026, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Employment growth will vary by occupation.Advertising, promotional, and marketing campaigns are expected to continue to be essential as organizations seek to maintain and expand their market share. Advertising and promotions managers will be needed to plan, direct, and coordinate advertising and promotional campaigns, as well as to introduce new products into the marketplace.

Support Button on keyboard key
Computer Support Technician Certificate
Program OverviewCourse GuideAdditional Information
The purpose of this certificate is to prepare the student for an entry-level computer support or repair position. The student will learn to perform tasks such as installation, configuration, diagnosing, preventive maintenance, and optimization of PC hardware and software. Computer network and security concepts will be taught, as well as, customer service skills. The core computer courses will map to the latest CompTIA certification objective. This certificate may be applied toward the Associate of Applied Science in Business or Associate of Applied Science in Technology.

Required Coursework (33 credit hours)

CIS 101 Introduction to Computers & Software 4 credits
CIS 102 CISCO I* 3 credits
CIS 117 Visual Basic Programming for Microcomputers* 3 credits
CIS 220 Computer Technician Essentials 3 credits
CIS 224 Computer Repair Essentials* 3 credits
CIS 240 Introduction to Networking* 3 credits
CIS 241 Install and Configure a Windows Network* 3 credits
CIS 243 Administrating a Windows Server* 3 credits
CIS 245 Network Security* 3 credits
CIS 270 PC Operating Systems* 3 credits
CIS 290 Capstone Project* 2 credits

 

Choose a minimum of 5 credits from the following CIS courses:

CIS 100 Using the Internet 1 credit
CIS 103 Cisco II 3 credits
CIS 214 Presentation Graphics & Publishing 3 credits
CIS 227 Concepts of Spreadsheets Level I 3 credits
CIS 233 Concepts of Word Processing Level II 3 credits
CIS 234 Database Applications 3 credits
CIS 252 Web Design I 3 credits
CIS 253 Web Design II 3 credits
CIS 254 Web Design III 3 credits
Total: 38-39 credits
*Course has a prerequisite

 

Effective: Fall 2011
Revised: 12/19/16

Employment Information

Corporate Positions
Graduates with this certificate
will be qualified to work in a
mobile or corporate technical
environment with a high level of
face-to-face interaction. Job
titles in some organizations
describing the role of this
individual may be: Enterprise
technician, IT administrator, field
service technician, PC technician
and others.

Computer Support Technicians provide help and support to people and organizations using computer software or equipment. They may also install, repair and maintain different types of computer equipment. The technician may focus on networks and servers, or other areas.

Several thousand new computer support specialists will be needed in Michigan by 2020, according to the Michigan Department of Energy, Labor and Economic Growth. The number of computer support specialists is expected to grow by 31 percent and they will earn close to $22 per hour.

The Business and Computer Sciences department at Glen Oaks Community College is meeting this occupational need with a certificate that prepares students for entry-level computer support and repair positions. The certificate requires 32 credit hours, including 29 core credits and three credits hours from an elective course like Web Page Design, Advanced Visual Basic Programming or Network Administration (Windows NOS).


Is this for me?
Computer support technicians should enjoy working with people, be open-minded to learning new technology and be able to multitask. It is important for those employed in this profession to have patience and know that there will be times when there will be extended hours outside the normal work day.

Glen Oaks Program
The Computer Support Technician certificate prepares students for entry-level computer support or repair positions. Students learn hardware and operating systems skills necessary to work in support for both local and wide area network environments.Students learn to perform tasks such as installation, configuration, diagnosing, preventive maintenance and optimization of PC hardware and software. Computer network and security concepts are taught, along with customer service skills.

The core computer courses will map to the latest Comp TIA certification objective.

Metalwork
Welding Certificate (Open Entry/Open Exit)
Program OverviewCourse GuideNOCTI Test Results

Students enrolled in a Welding program will understand gases used in welding, cutting processes, brazing and soldering, joints, demonstrate shielded metal arc welding, demonstrate advanced arc welding, welding metallurgy, gas metal arc welding, gas tungsten arc welding, pipe welding, and welding fabrication.

This certificate may be applied toward the Associate of Applied Science in Technology degree.

Required Coursework (718 hours)

WELD 105 Basics of Welding 0.43 credits
WELD 110 Oxyacetylene Welding 1.54 credits
WELD 115 Cutting Processes 0.79 credits
WELD 120 Brazing and Soldering 0.92 credits
WELD 125 Shielded Metal Arc Welding 4.02 credits
WELD 130 Advanced Arc Welding 5.74 credits
WELD 135 Welding Metallurgy 1.27 credits
WELD 140 Gas Metal Arc Welding 2.80 credits
WELD 145 Gas Tungsten Arc Welding 5.01 credits
WELD 150 Pipe Welding 4.37 credits
WELD 155 Special Application 1.68 credits
Total: 28.57 credits
*Course has a prerequisite

 

Effective: Fall 2015
Current as: 4/1/2015

National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI)
Standardized Test Results (2016):
NOCTI Welding Test Results
Safety Symbols & Blueprint Reading Oxyfuel Cutting (OFC) Arc Cutting Process (Carbon Arc & Plasma Arc) Physical Characteristics & Mechanical Properties of Metals
Standard Students 57.6 45.5 52.6 52.4 66.7
CTE Students 68.9 52.7 37.6 46.0 50.4
State Avg 69.9 69.5 49.0 48.0 56.9
National Avg 70.1 66.7 54.4 53.6 59.2

 

NOCTI Welding Test Results
Weld Fit-Up & Quality Shielded Metal Arc (SMAW) Gas Metal Arc (GMAW) & Flux Cored Arc (FCAW) Gas Tungsten Arc (GTAW)
Standard Students 71.4 60.8 25.5 43.3
CTE Students 54.8 49.7 40.0 41.8
State Avg 62.0 52.3 48.4 53.8
National Avg 62.8 58.6 53.9 58.4

 

NOCTI Welding Test Results
Composite Score
Standard Students 53.3
CTE Students 49.3
State Avg 56.3
National Avg 59.3

 

 

Metal Worker Factory
Machine Tool Certificate (Open Entry/Open Exit)
Program OverviewCourse GuideAdditional Information

Students enrolled in the Machine Tool program will understand machine tool safety and demonstrate precise measurement. They will learn to operate the drill press, band saw and lathe. The program provides students with experience in lathe turning, electronic discharge machine operation, vertical and horizontal milling, grinding, CNC programming, heat treating, jigs, fixture design, die design, mold design and project planning.

This certificate may be applied toward the Associate of Applied Science in Technology degree.

Required Coursework (1090 hours)

MACH 105 Machine Tool Basics 0.17 credits
MACH 110 Machine Tool Safety 0.17 credits
MACH 115 Blueprint Reading 1.16 credits
MACH 120 Fundamental Skills 1.98 credits
MACH 125 Precision Measurement 2.75 credits
MACH 130 Drill Press and Band Saw 2.51 credits
MACH 135 Turning on Lathe 4.61 credits
MACH 140 Electronic Discharge Machining 0.79 credits
MACH 145 Vertical/Horizontal Milling 5.84 credits
MACH 150 Surface Grinding 2.75 credits
MACH 155 Cylindrical Grinding 1.50 credits
MACH 160 Tool and Cutter Grinding 3.00 credits
MACH 165 CNC Programming and Machining 6.25 credits
MACH 170 Machine Tool Projects 5.58 credits
MACH 175 Mastercam 4.50 credits
MACH 180 Plasma Cutter 1.84 credits
Total: 45.40 credits
*Course has a prerequisite

 

Effective: Fall 2015
Current as: 4/1/2015

Employment Information

Outlook
The Bureau of Labor Statistics
predicts overall employment of
machinists and tool and die makers
is projected to show little or no
change from 2016 to 2026. Job
opportunities for machinists and
tool and die makers should be good
because of the number of job
openings arising each year from the
need to replace workers who retire
or leave the occupation.

Machinists and tool and die makers set up and operate a variety of computer-controlled and mechanically controlled machine tools to produce precision metal parts, instruments and tools. They work in machine shops, toolrooms and factories. Although many work full time during regular business hours, overtime may be common, as is evening and weekend work.

Machinists’ and tool and die makers’ work must be accurate, often demanding accuracy to within .00001 of an inch, a level of accuracy that requires concentration and dexterity.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook, the 2016 median salary for machinists was $41,700 per year and for tool and die makers was $51,060 per year.


Is this for me?
Consider a career in machining and tool and die making if you pay attention to detail, have an aptitude for design, are comfortable with using computers and machines in your work, and don’t mind spending extra time to finish a project.

Glen Oaks Program
Students enrolled in the Machine Tool program will understand machine tool safety and demonstrate precise measurement. They will learn to operate the drill press, band saw and lathe. The program provides students with experience in lathe turning, electronic discharge machine operation, vertical and horizontal milling, grinding, CNC programming, heat treating, jigs, fixture design, die design, mold design and project planning. The Machine Tool Certificate is available in a convenient Open-Entry/Open-Exit format. Open-Entry/Open-Exit classes provide an alternative to traditional classroom learning. They are self-paced programs that are a convenient and flexible way to gain college credits. Students complete modules depending on their needs and educational goals. Instructors are in the labs to provide guidance and assistance. For more information, contact the Admissions Office at (269) 294-4253.
Person working on accounting from a personal laptop computer.
Accounting Certificate
Program OverviewCourse GuideAdditional Information
This is an entry-level certificate for students wishing to pursue accounting careers in the retail, service, or manufacturing sector. Emphasis is placed on accounting principles and knowledge, as well as basic business and communications skills. This certificate may be applied towards the Associate of Applied Science in Business Degree.

Required Coursework

ACCT 100 Fundamentals of Accounting 4 credits
ACCT 109 Payroll Accounting* 2 credits
ACCT 111 Principles of Accounting I* 4 credits
ACCT 112 Principles of Accounting II* 4 credits
ACCT 113 Quick Books for Accounting* 2 credits
ACCT 204 Small Business Tax Accounting 2 credits
ACCT 213 Cost Accounting* 3 credits
BUS 111 Contemporary Business/Technical Communications 4 credits
OR
BUS 104 Introduction to Business 4 credits
ACCT 281 Accounting Practicum (Bookkeeping Industry Certification Review)** 4 credits
Total: 29 credits
*Course has a prerequisite
**Course is optional

Effective: Fall 2012
Current/Updated: 3/17/16

Employment Information

Accounting Certificate
The Accounting Certificate is a
program of study for those wishing
to pursue entry-level positions in
accounting and tax services, CPA
firms, retail stores, wholesale
firms, banks, manufacturing,
government agencies, hospitals,
education, entertainment/film and
insurance. Emphasis is placed on
accounting principles and
knowledge, as well as basic
business and communications skills.

Accountants and auditors review and prepare financial documents. They may work in the private or public sector or in non-for-profit organizations or in government. Their job is to ensure accuracy and that the business runs efficiently. Accountants who prepare tax returns are prepared to meet all the latest tax regulations and ensure that they are filed on time.

There are about 1.2 million accountants and auditor jobs in the U.S. and employment is expected to grow 16 percent through 2020 according to the National Bureau of Labor Statistics. There are approximately 1.8 million bookkeepers, accounting and auditing clerks in the U.S. with an expected growth of 14 percent.

Median annual pay for accountants and auditors was $61,690 in the latest data from the NBLS, while median annual pay for bookkeeping, accounting and auditing clerks was $34,030.

Professional accountants and auditors in Michigan, with added experience, an advanced degree and/or certified public accountant (CPA) credentials, averaged annual pay of over $60,000 in 2006. Tax accountants in large organizations are likely to be paid between $38,000 and $46,000 to start, according to the major staffing firm Robert Half International.


Is this for me?
Accountants should have an aptitude for mathematics and be able to analyze compare and interpret facts and figures quickly. They must be able to clearly communicate results to client and managers. Accountants must have high standards of integrity and they must be good at working with people, business systems and computers.
Add to your certificate
This certificate program applies toward the Associate of Applied Science in Business Degree (62 credits) which is designed for those moving directly into the workplace upon graduation. This flexible degree offers a wide range of classroom experiences in accounting, computers, management, marketing, administrative assistant, supervision and medical-related careers.
Young woman industrial service engineer wearing white helmet standing, working, checking conducts front of a control panel read and writing notes with digital tablet in energy control room of modern power plant electric energy station. XXXL size taken with Canon 5D MIV
Electrical Technologies Certificate (Open Entry/Open Exit)
Program OverviewCourse GuideAdditional Information

The Electrical Technologies Certificate program is designed to upgrade skills or prepare the student with entry-level knowledge and skills in electronic theory and circuitry. The student will be trained in using equipment essential for employment in communication, industrial electronics, radio/television, and other electronic occupations. Completion of this certificate can prepare students for industry-wide certification. The Electrical Technologies Certificate can also be used toward an Associate of Applied Science in Technology Degree.

Required coursework

ELEC 110 Basic Electricity 4 Credits/6 Contacts
ELEC 111 Introduction to AC/DC Circuits 4 Credits/6 Contacts
ELEC 116 Residential Electricity 4 Credits/6 Contacts
ELEC 119 Introduction to the National Electrical Code 4 Credits/6 Contacts
ELEC 120 Electrical Motor Controls I 4 Credits/6 Contacts
ELEC 122 Introduction to Motors and Transformers 4 Credits/6 Contacts
MATH 109 Mathematics for Technicians I  OR 3 Credits/3 Contacts
MATH 151 College Algebra* 4 Credits/4 Contacts
Total: 31-32 credits
*Course has a prerequisite

 

Tuition is calculated on contact hours.

Current/Updated: 5/14/2020

Employment Information

Outlook
The Bureau of Labor Statistics
predicts employment of electrical
and electronics engineering
technicians will grow two percent
from 2016 to 2026, slower than the
average for all occupations.
Employment of these technicians
is projected to decline in many
manufacturing industries and in
the federal government.

Electrical and electronics engineering technicians help engineers design and develop computers, communications equipment, medical monitoring devices, navigational equipment, and other electrical and electronic equipment. They often work in product evaluation and testing, and use measuring and diagnostic devices to adjust, test and make repairs. They are also involved in the manufacture and deployment of equipment for automation. Electrical and electronics engineering technicians work closely with electrical engineers. They work primarily in manufacturing settings, engineering services, the federal government, research-and-development laboratories, and the utilities industry.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook, the 2016 median salary for electrical or electronics
engineering technicians was $62,190 per year.


Is this for me?
Consider a career as an electrical and electronics engineering technician if you are fascinated by how circuits or electronic devices work, if you enjoy evaluating products and diagnosing problems, and if you have an aptitude for design.

Glen Oaks Program
The Electrical Technologies Certificate program is designed to upgrade skills or prepare the student with entry-level knowledge and skills in electronic theory and circuitry. The student will be trained in using equipment essential for employment in communications, industrial electronics, radio/television, and other electronic occupations. Completion of this certificate can prepare students for industry-wide certification. The Electrical Technologies Certificate can also be used toward an Associate of Applied Science in Technology degree.The Electrical Technologies Certificate is available in a convenient Open-Entry/Open-Exit format. Open-Entry/Open-Exit classes provide an alternative to traditional classroom learning. They are self-paced programs that are a convenient and flexible way to gain college credits. Students complete modules depending on their needs and educational goals. Instructors are in the labs to provide guidance and assistance. For more information, contact the Admissions Office at (269) 294-4253.
one computer monitor with a cam software and the finished product near it (3d render)
Computer Aided Drafting & Design Certificate
Program OverviewCourse GuideAdditional Information
Students completing the Computer Aided Drafting & Design Certificate will be prepared for entry- level mechanical design and layout for the manufacturing industry. In addition, basic construction design work will be introduced. The student will be able to use current CADD software for both 2-D and 3-D presentations. The certificate is designed to articulate credit for Career Technical Education students from regional K-12 programs. This certificate may be applied toward the Associate of Applied Science in Technology.

Required Coursework (30 hours)

CIS 101 Introduction to Computers & Software* 4 credits
INDS 151 Manufacturing Processes 3 credits
CADD 215 Basic AutoCad 3 credits
CADD 216 Advanced AutoCad* 3 credits
CADD 217 Computer Aided 3D Modeling – Inventor* 3 credits
CADD 218 Computer Aided 3D Modeling- Solidworks* 3 credits
OR
CADD 219 Advanced Computer Aided Drafting 3D Modeling 3 credits
CADD 220 Architectural Drawing 3 credits
CADD 221 3D Architecture Modeling* 3 credits
CADD 222 Descriptive Geometry* 3 credits
CADD 230 Capstone Project* 2 credits
Total: 30 credits
*Course has a prerequisite

 

Computer Aided Drafting & Design Certificate
Scope & Sequence

Fall 1 Winter 1 Fall 2 Winter 2
CIS 101 CADD 216 CADD 217 CADD 218
CADD 215 CADD 222 INDS 151 OR
CADD 220 CADD 219
CADD 221
CADD 230

 

Applied Science and Technology Degree – CADD Certificate
Scope & Sequence

Fall 1 Winter 1 Fall 2 Winter 2
CADD 215 BUS 111 CADD 217 CADD 218
CIS 101 CADD 216 CADD 220 CADD 221
ENG 121 CADD 222 INDS 151 CADD 230
MATH 100 COM 150 PSY 101 PHYS 155
SOC 120

 

Effective: Fall 2015
Updated: 3/17/16

Outlook

Technician Certificate
Although the Bureau of Labor
Statistics predicts
slower-than-average job growth for
the drafting field overall between
2012 and 2022, electrical and
electronics drafters are projected
to experience job growth at 10
percent, which is closer to the
national average of all careers at
11 percent. Expertise in the
latest industry software may
increase the likelihood of
securing employment in this field.

Computer Aided Drafting & Design operators (or drafters) are a crucial part of any business relating to manufacturing or engineering. Drafters will convert the technical drawings of architects and engineers into digital designs that are used to produce everything from the smallest circuitry to the largest building.

Companies desire specially trained drafters who have gone through a technical program to develop the skills needed to not only create the designs but those who can also work from rough sketches, design products themselves, or use their own knowledge to further develop another drafter’s designs. A solid understanding of science, drawing and mathematics are important for drafters in any field.

Types of drafters include: architectural, civil, electrical, electronics and mechanical. Several fields may require visits to building sites and interaction with other drafters, so good interpersonal communication skills are important.

According to the latest data from the U.S. Department of Labor, drafters in this specialized area report an annual median salary of $51,940.


CADD Certification

This certificate is ideal for the individual who can create organized and precise designs and who is looking for a field that offers a wide variety of industries in which he or she can work. The 28-credit certificate applies toward the Associate of Applied Science in Business degree or the Associate of Applied Science in Technology degree.

Associate of Applied
Science in Technology

This flexible associate degree provides a wide range of experience aimed at helping students move directly into the workplace upon graduation.

Is this for me?

CADD designers are technical and have an eye for detail and design. They are focused on the specifications of their designs, while mastering the technical software tools and technologies. An understanding of spacial relations is beneficial in this highly visual field.
Mechanic using Diagnostic machine tools for car
Automotive Technician Certificate
Program OverviewCourse GuideAdditional Information
This program of study is designed to prepare technicians for the high-tech automotive industry. This Certificate is a continuation of the basic Certificate of Achievement in Automotive Service; it prepares students to take state and national certification tests. Completion of this certificate will prepare students for industry-wide certification. The Automotive Technician Certificate can also be used toward an Associate of Applied Science in Technology Degree.

Certificate Program Required

Certificate of Achievement — Automotive Service 16 Credits

To be granted the Automotive Technician Certificate, students must complete the Automotive Service Certificate of Achievement
Required Courses (15 credit hours)

AUTO 141 Engine Diagnosis and Ignition Systems* 3 Credits/6 Contacts
AUTO 226 Auto Heating and Air Conditioning * 3 Credits/6 Contacts
AUTO 245 Automotive Valve Train & Head Rebuilding* 3 Credits/6 Contacts
AUTO 246 Automotive Cylinder Block Rebuilding* 3 Credits/6 Contacts
AUTO 250 Introduction to Automotive Transmissions*  OR 3 Credits/6 Contacts
TECH 271 Internship I* (by special arrangement) 3 Credits/3 Contacts
Total: 31 credits
*Course has a prerequisite(s)

 

ASE and/or State of Michigan Certification
Upon successful completion of the required course work, including the prerequisite Certificate of Achievement in Automotive Service, the graduate should be ready for the State of Michigan and/or ASE Certification in the following Automotive Specialty Areas:

  • Brakes & Braking Systems
  • Front End Suspension & Steering Systems
  • Electrical Systems
  • Engine Repair
  • Engine Tune-up/Performance
  • Heating & Air Conditioning
  • Automatic Transmission (for students selecting AUTO 250)

 

Current: 04/08/2020

Employment Information

Technician Certificate
This program of study is designed
to prepare technicians for the
high-tech automotive industry. It
also prepares them to take state
and national certification tests.
Upon successful completion of the
required course work, the graduate
should be ready for the State of
Michigan and/or Automotive Service
Excellence Certification in the
following Automotive Specialty
Areas: brakes, automotive
transmission, engine repair,
electrical, manual transmission,
engine tune-up, heating and air
conditioning, and front end.

Automotive service technicians and mechanics hold about 800,000 jobs. The majority work in:

  • Automotive repair and maintenance shops
  • Automobile dealerships
  • Retail and wholesale automotive parts, accessories and supplies
  • Service stations
  • Automotive supply stores
  • Federal, state and local government garages
  • Self-employed automotive establishments

Employment is expected to gradually increase through 2020 as vehicles in operation increase and multiple vehicle families grow. Employment growth will be concentrated in dealerships and independent auto repair shops. More than 16 percent of service technicians are self-employed, twice the number in all other installation, maintenance and repair fields. People entering the occupation can expect steady work. The median annual wage of automotive service technicians and mechanics is over $35,000, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.


Service Certificate

This instructional program is designed to prepare individuals for entry-level employment in automotive service centers. Upon completion of the Automotive Service Certificate courses, the prospective service center technician will have proficiency in the fundamentals of basic electronics, tuneup, diagnosis and repair, brake service and fuels.

Is this for me?

The work of automotive service technicians and mechanics has evolved from mechanical repair to a high technology job. Technicians must have an increasingly broad base of knowledge about how the complex components work and interact, as well as the ability to work with electronic diagnostic equipment and computer-based technical reference materials. Technicians must assess the symptoms, then take a diagnostic approach to isolate the components logically causing the problem, perhaps taking a test drive and/or using a variety of testing equipment to identify the source of the problem.

Students in the Glen Oaks automotive programs are prepared to excel in today’s high-tech automotive industry.

Two trainee car mechanics in garage repairing car, young man smiling and concentrating
Automotive Service Certificate of Achievement
Program OverviewCourse GuideAdditional Information
This instructional program is a basic program designed to prepare individuals for entry-level employment in automotive service centers. Upon completion of the following courses, the prospective service center technician will have proficiency in the fundamentals of basic electronics, tune-up, diagnosis and repair, brake service, and fuels.

Required Courses

AUTO 100 Intro to Automotive Technology 3 Credits/3 Contacts
AUTO 146 Automotive Brake Systems* 3 Credits/6 Contacts
AUTO 221 Automotive Steering and Suspension* 3 Credits/6 Contacts
AUTO 225 Automotive Electrical Systems* 3 Credits/6 Contacts
WELD 190 Applied Welding for Skilled Trades 4 Credits/4 Contacts
Total: 16 credits
*Course has a prerequisite

 

ASE and/or State of Michigan Certification
Upon successful completion of the required course work, the graduate should be ready for the State of Michigan and/or ASE Certification in the following Automotive Specialty Areas:

  • Brakes & Braking Systems
  • Front End Suspension & Steering Systems
  • Electrical Systems

Current/Updated: 04/08/2020

Employment Information

Service Certificate
This instructional program is
designed to prepare individuals
for entry-level employment in
automotive service centers.
Upon completion of the Automotive
Service Certificate courses, the
prospective service center
technician will have proficiency
in the fundamentals of basic
electronics, tuneup, diagnosis and
repair, brake service and fuels.

Automotive service technicians and mechanics hold about 800,000 jobs. The majority work in:

  • Automotive repair and maintenance shops
  • Automobile dealerships
  • Retail and wholesale automotive parts, accessories and supplies
  • Service stations
  • Automotive supply stores
  • Federal, state and local government garages
  • Self-employed automotive establishments

Employment is expected to gradually increase through 2020 as vehicles in operation increase and multiple vehicle families grow. Employment growth will be concentrated in dealerships and independent auto repair shops. More than 16 percent of service technicians are self-employed, twice the number in all other installation, maintenance and repair fields. People entering the occupation can expect steady work. The median annual wage of automotive service technicians and mechanics is over $35,000, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.


Technician Certificate

This program of study is designed to prepare technicians for the high-tech automotive industry. It also prepares them to take state and national certification tests. Upon successful completion of the required course work, the graduate should be ready for the State of Michigan and/or Automotive Service Excellence Certification in the following Automotive Specialty Areas: brakes, automotive transmission, engine repair, electrical, manual transmission, engine tune-up, heating and air conditioning, and front end.

Is this for me?

The work of automotive service technicians and mechanics has evolved from mechanical repair to a high technology job. Technicians must have an increasingly broad base of knowledge about how the complex components work and interact, as well as the ability to work with electronic diagnostic equipment and computer-based technical reference materials. Technicians must assess the symptoms, then take a diagnostic approach to isolate the components logically causing the problem, perhaps taking a test drive and/or using a variety of testing equipment to identify the source of the problem.

Students in the Glen Oaks automotive programs are prepared to excel in today’s high-tech automotive industry.

Man's hand with adjustable wrench near old diesel engine
Agricultural Equipment Technology Certificate
Program OverviewCourse Guide
This certificate is designed to develop technically competent professional agricultural equipment service technicians. Students receive state-of-the-art technical education on the latest agricultural equipment through a combination of classroom instruction, hands-on laboratory instruction and supervised occupational work experience at a partnering dealership.

Agricultural Courses (minimum 38.43 credit hours required)

AGT 101 Hydraulic Theory & Operation 2 Credits/4 Contacts
AGT 102 Production Agriculture 2 Credits/3 Contacts
AGT 103 Fundamentals of Engines 3 Credits/7 Contacts
AGT 104 Vehicle/Equipment Electrical/Electronic Fundamentals 3 Credits/5 Contacts
AGT 107 Preventive Maintenance & Service 2 Credits/4 Contacts
AGT 109 Heating, Venting & Air Conditioning Systems 2 Credits/4 Contacts
AGT 112 Seeding & Tillage Equipment 2 Credits/4 Contacts
AGT 113 Hydraulic Systems* 2 Credits/4 Contacts
AGT 116 Combine Maintenance & Repair 3 Credits/7 Contacts
AGT 119 Vehicle/Equipment Electrical/Electronic Systems Operation & Diagnostics* 3 Credits/7 Contacts
AGT 122 Precision Farming Systems & Techniques* 2 Credits/4 Contacts
AGT 125 Tractor Drivelines* 2 Credits/4 Contacts
AGT 207 Advanced Hydraulics* 2 Credits/4 Contacts
AGT 213 Diesel Engine Performance – Analysis & Tune Up* 3 Credits/5 Contacts
AGT 216 Equipment Shop Project* 4 Credits/10 Contacts
WELD 190 Basics of Welding 4 Credits/4 Contacts

 

(choose 1-3)

AGT 219 Diesel Tech Field Experience I (Internship) 1 Credits/1 Contacts
AGT 220 Diesel Tech Field Experience II (Internship) 2 Credits/2 Contacts
AGT 219 Diesel Tech Field Experience III (Internship) 3 Credits/3 Contacts
Total: 42-44 credits
*Course has a prerequisite

 

NOTE: AGT 219, AGT 220, AGT 221 are billed by credits
Scope & Sequence

Fall 1 Winter 1 Summer 1 Fall 2 Winter 2
AGT 101 AGT 104 AGT 219/220/221 AGT 112 AGT 122
AGT 102 AGT 113 AGT 125 AGT 109
AGT 103 AGT 116 AGT 207 AGT 216
AGT 107 WELD 190 AGT 213 AGT 219/220/221
AGT 119 AGT 219/220/221 AGT 219/220/221
AGT 219/220/221

Current/Revised: 04/08/2020