All Courses

ACCOUNTING

(ACCT formerly BAA)

ACCT 100 FUNDAMENTALS OF ACCOUNTING

4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is a basic bookkeeping-accounting course designed for the student who has no previous bookkeeping-accounting experience or has not performed well in previous courses of this type. Basic double-entry bookkeeping procedures, accounting terminology and concepts, and basic financial statement preparation are emphasized. Major emphasis will be placed on the sole proprietorship form of business organization.

 
Prerequisite: None

ACCT 109 PAYROLL ACCOUNTING

2 Credits, 2 Contacts

This course has been developed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the calculations in payroll, the payroll records that are kept, and the laws pertaining to tax filing for payroll. This is a beginning course that involves computation and recording of payroll entries.

Prerequisite: ACCT 100

ACCT 111 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I

4 Credits, 4 Contacts

The first introductory accounting course for the student who wishes to pursue a career in the field of business. The student will become familiar with the role of the accountant and manager in service and merchandising businesses. The course will include the recording and reporting of business transactions and the measuring, planning, and controlling of business income, assets, and equities. Major emphasis will be placed on the sole proprietorship form of business organization.
 
Prerequisite: ACCT 100 or High School Bookkeeping

ACCT 112 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II

4 Credits, 4 Contacts

A second semester course in accounting principles and concepts for the accounting or managerial student. The student will investigate the role of the accountant in partnerships and corporations, with emphasis on financial and cost-accounting concepts as well as branches and departments, and owner’s equity.

 
Prerequisite: ACCT 111 or its equivalent

ACCT 113 QUICKBOOKS FOR ACCOUNTING

2 Credits, 2 Contacts

This accounting course will provide the student with an understanding of QuickBooks accounting. The student will receive instruction and experience with QuickBooks software through a simulated business scenario. Accounting principles and logical problem solving will be utilized. Instruction will include how to set up a business, maintain and use the software and generate financial reports.

 
Prerequisite: ACCT 111

ACCT 202 PERSONAL INCOME TAX ACCOUNTING

2 Credits, 2 Contacts

An introductory tax course with emphasis placed on tax return preparation for individuals. Multiple forms will be used. Tax laws involved in tax return preparation and tax theory will be emphasized.

 
Prerequisite: ACCT 100

ACCT 204 SMALL BUSINESS TAX ACCOUNTING

2 Credits, 2 Contacts

An introductory tax course with emphasis placed on tax return preparation for small businesses. Accounting for taxable revenues and tax-deductible expenses will be emphasized.
 
Prerequisite: ACCT 100

ACCT 207 ANALYZING FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

3 Credits, 3 Contacts

A course which presents the basic skills of financial statement analysis for the prospective bank lender/credit analyst. This includes how financial data is generated; techniques for analyzing the flow of a business’ funds; methods for selecting and interpreting financial ratios; and the analytical tools for predicting and testing assumptions
about a firm’s future performance.

 
Prerequisite: ACCT 111

ACCT 210 INCOME TAX ACCOUNTING

3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is an introductory tax course with emphasis placed on tax return preparation for businesses and individuals. Students will investigate laws involved in tax accounting with secondary emphasis on tax theory.

 
Prerequisite: ACCT 100

ACCT 211 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING

4 Credits, 4 Contacts

A financial accounting course for both the accounting and management major. Balance sheet accounts are scrutinized in this class with emphasis placed on generally accepted accounting principles.

 
Prerequisite: ACCT 112 or its equivalent

ACCT 213 COST ACCOUNTING

3 Credits, 3 Contacts

A basic course in the theories and practices underlying the development of cost information for financial control and decision making. As manufacturing, service, and distribution establishments strive to enhance their profits and reduce consumer prices, the study and control of costs become increasingly important. The student will gain an understanding of techniques used to control cost for profit by management. This is an excellent course for the aspiring business administration and accounting major because it will give an insight into the area of profit and loss control.

 
Prerequisite: ACCT 112

 

ALLIED HEALTH

(ALH)

ALH 100 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH CAREERS


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

Presents information on the health care system and employment opportunities for a variety of health care careers. Includes an overview of health care development, how health delivery systems are organized, legal and ethical considerations of health care delivery, and an overview of various health care professions. Students are encouraged to explore health professions through assignments, lab observations, job shadowing and interviews with health care professionals in their area of interest. This course includes online activities that support the presented concepts.

 
Prerequisite: Test above ENG 063

ALH 103 NUTRITION


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is designed to assist the student in developing a foundation for good nutrition. Fundamental principles of nutrition essential to maintain health, prevent illness and provide support during illness are presented. Nutritional concerns relating to each age group will be addresses as well as specific disease conditions and relevant therapeutic diets. Newly emerging nutritional information will be discussed which will assist the student to become a discriminating consumer.

Prerequisite: None

ALH 104 NURSE AIDE COURSE


6 Credits, 6 Contacts

This course is designed to guide you in learning the skills required for certification as a nurse aide. The course will give you the skills needed to do your duties as a (NA) nurse aide and prepare you for the state certification exam. The lessons will help you better understand your residents and in turn help you to understand your role in relation to these residents.

 
Prerequisite: None

ALH 111 DIAGNOSTIC CODING


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is designed to provide students with the necessary principles for properly coding diseases, conditions, and injuries. Students will learn and be expected to demonstrate the ability to translate written diagnoses into the appropriate ICD-9-CM numeric designations. Emphasis is also placed on coding compliance and adherence to official guidelines. Students gain an understanding to the importance of data quality and data integrity. This course will prepare students to successfully pass the AHIMA CCS-P (Certified Coding Specialist –Physician Office) certification exam.

 
Prerequisite: ALH 218 Medical Terminology,
BIO 101 Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology or BIO 210/BIO 211

ALH 205 Pharmacology for Health Occupations


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is an introduction to basic pharmacology with an emphasis on the importance of medications in helping people to maintain a healthy lifestyle. The most common medications in current use are discussed according to body systems, with emphasis on classifications, uses, routes of administration, dosages, interactions, incompatibilities, and side effects with special emphasis on the 50 most commonly prescribed drugs as listed in Pharmacy Times. Also addressed are special precautions, legal aspects, patient education, preparation, and administration of medications as directed by the physician. Additional emphasis is placed on the performance of basic math, calculation of drug dosages and immunization schedules and administration. (This course is not intended for nursing students. Medical Assisting students must take in traditional classroom setting.)

Prerequisite: ALH 218 Medical Terminology and test into or higher than or completion of MATH 100 Introductory Algebra

ALH 210 PROCEDURAL CODING


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is designed to provide students with the necessary principles for applying the CPT procedural code that most accurately identifies the service performed. Students will learn and be expected to demonstrate the ability to translate documentation into the appropriate procedural code. Emphasis is also placed on coding compliance and adherence to official guidelines. Students gain an understanding to the importance of data quality and data integrity. This course will prepare students to successfully pass the AHIMA CCS-P (Certified Coding Specialist – Physician Office) certification exam.

 
Prerequisite: ALH 111 Diagnostic Coding

ALH 218 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course addresses basic terminology required of the Allied Health professional and provides a basic knowledge of anatomy and physiology, pathology, special procedures, laboratory procedures, and pharmacology. Greek and Latin prefixes, suffixes, word roots and combining forms are presented. Emphasis is on forming a foundation for a medical vocabulary including meaning, spelling and pronunciation. Medical abbreviations, signs and symbols are included.

 
Prerequisite: Placement beyond or satisfactory completion of ENG 063 and ENG 073

ALH 222 Disease Conditions


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

Presents the basic concepts of diseases, their causes and functional disturbances as they relate to body systems. Includes the participating risk factors and appropriate methods of patient education regarding various disease processes.

Prerequisite: ALH 218 Medical Terminology. Medical Assistant students are encouraged to take this course in a traditional classroom.

ALH 230 MEDICAL OFFICE LABORATORY PROCEDURES


4 Credits, 6 Contacts

This course involves the study of interactions between microbes and humans and the practice of handling medically important microbes, blood and body fluids. Practical experiences include aseptic techniques in collecting, handling and testing of specimens. The student will learn how to accurately collect and process blood samples by mastering both phlebotomy and capillary blood collection techniques. Quality control issues of the clinical laboratory will be stressed along with OSHA standards of infection control. The safety and emergency practices of the medical office will be presented and evaluated through competencies.

Prerequisite: ALH 218 Medical Terminology and test into or higher than or completion of MATH 100 Introductory Algebra

ALH 232 ADMINISTRATIVE I – MEDICAL OFFICE PROCEDURES


4 Credits, 5 Contacts

 

This is an introduction to the office management and business administration of a medical office. Information relating to reception duties, telephone procedures, handling medical records, filing and record management, as well as a medical-legal responsibility.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 101

ALH 233 ADMINISTRATIVE II – ADVANCED MEDICAL OFFICE PROCEDURES


4 Credits, 5 Contacts

This course follows an introduction to office management and business administration of a medical office in Administrative I. The medical office finances are covered including: coding, diagnostic and procedural, billing of all types of insurance claims both manually and electronically, professional fees, payroll, and the management of practice finances. Advanced concepts of the electronic medical record are introduced.

 
Prerequisite: ALH 232

ALH 235 Medical Assistant Clinical I


3 Credits, 5 Contacts

Medical Clinical I covers the responsibilities of the medical assistant in working with the physician in the medical office/clinic. These responsibilities include obtaining patient medical history; measuring vital signs; preparing the examination room and the patient for the exam; and performing basic clinical procedures such as EKG, basic respiratory care, basic life support and first aid. Instruction will include documentation, patient education and safety measures. Cultural, life- span and psychosocial differences will be addressed.

Prerequisite: ALH 218 Medical Terminology and test into or higher than or completion of MATH 100 Introductory Algebra

ALH 236 Medical Assisting Clinical II


3 Credits, 5 Contacts

Clinical II is a continuation of Clinical I. Following the Clinical II experience students will be able to administer various forms of medication, demonstrate proper technique for venipuncture for purpose of obtaining blood specimens, provide equipment set up for intravenous medications and fluids, and demonstrate skills in assisting with minor surgical procedures and assisting with pediatric care in the office.

Prerequisite: ALH 230 Medical Office Laboratory Procedures, ALH 235 Medical Assistant Clinical I

ALH 238 MEDICAL ASSISTANT PRACTICUM


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

The Medical Assistant practicum focuses first on the business/administration aspect within the clinical setting. It is intended to provide the student with experience in the work environment in the front office area. The second half of the practicum focuses on clinical aspects in the patient care area of the medical clinic. The practicum is 12-15 weeks and requires 200 hours, plus attendance at a twice monthly, 2 hour scheduled seminar, for a total of 12 hours. This is an unpaid educational work experience to be taken concurrently with ALH 290 and after all other coursework in the program has been successfully completed. After successful completion of this course, the student may apply to the American Association of Medical Assisting (AAMA) to write the certifying exam for Medical Assisting (CMA, AAMA).

Prerequisite: Student must have completed all the curriculum courses in the Medical Assistant Certificate program with a minimum of 2.0 GPA in each theory class; a minimum of 2.5 in the administrative/clinical courses, ALH 122, 123, 232, 233; and an overall GPA of 2.5. This course must be taken the semester following the completion of ALH 123 or the student may be required to retake ALH 122 & 123.
 
 

General Requirements:

  1. The externship is to extend over a 15 week period.
  2. It is the student’s responsibility to negotiate a mutually acceptable work schedule with the agency.
  3. The student and externship supervisor will determine, with the supervisor at the work stations, the duties and requirements of the externship experience.
  4. At least 75% of your major coursework is completed, as determined by the externship supervisor, with an overall 2.5 GPA or above. Except in the Allied Health programs where 100% of coursework must be completed.

 

Procedure for Enrollment:

  1. An externship must be planned a semester in advance of registration and has the same drop/add deadline date as any other course beginning on the first day of the semester. Externship credit may not be granted on a retroactive basis.
  2. A student will need to meet with the externship supervisor to obtain approval and necessary forms.
  3. The student must complete an externship application, submit a resume and obtain 3 faculty recommendations from current or former instructors in your major area.
  4. Determine with the employer/supervisor a mutually acceptable work schedule, written objectives/duties of the job (signed by both student and employer/supervisor) and a start and finish date. You must turn in verification of hours worked and a completed student evaluation of the extern experience to the externship supervisor.
  5. After acceptance by the externship supervisor and the agency involved, and after returning to the externship supervisor the completed externship Learning Contract, a student may then officially register and begin the course.

ALH 240 INSURANCE CLAIMS PROCESSING


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is designed to provide students information necessary to accurately complete insurance claims for facilities and physicians. Students will demonstrate their ability to apply diagnostic and procedural codes to various forms of insurance. Emphasis will be placed on the ethical responsibilities of the Insurance Claims Specialist. Students will apply their learning to both paper claims and electronic billing. Current issues related to medical insurance will be discussed. This course will prepare students to successfully pass the AHIMA CCS-P (Certified Coding Specialist-Physician Office) certification exam.

 
Prerequisite: ALH 111 Diagnostic Coding & ALH 210 Procedural Coding

ALH 250 MEDICAL LAW & BIOETHICS


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is composed of two major components: bioethics and medical law and ethics. Bioethics is the study of the ethics of life (and death) and includes familiar topics such as abortion, cloning, stem cell research, allocation of scarce medical resources, and euthanasia. Topics in medical law and ethics, which are concerned with “mirco” issues such as the moral underpinnings of doctor-patient relationships as well as “macro” issues such as the structures of medical institutions or the duties that societies have to provide health care for those in need. It is intended to help prevent medical malpractice litigation by exposing the student to the legal concepts of standard of care, scope of employment, criminal and civil acts, contracts, negligence, as well as ethical and bioethical concepts that are emphasized in simulations, critical thinking activities, debates and a research paper.

 
Prerequisite: Placement beyond or satisfactory completion of ENG 063 and ENG 073

ALH 260 ADVANCED EKG INTERPRETATION


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is designed to assist the student who has obtained competency in the basic techniques of EKG application and interpretation through other coursework or programs. Interpretation of dysrhythmias, EKG analyses and the effects of ischemia and myocardial infarction on the electrical conduction system of the heart are presented. A comprehensive overview of acute coronary syndromes and up-to-date pacemaker information will be covered. The content is presented in a hands-on, lab format with built in redundancy and analogy that reinforces learning.

 
Prerequisite: BIO 101 or BIO 211 and ALH 218 and test into or higher than MATH 055

ALH 280 CODING SPECIALIST – PHYSICIAN-BASED (CCS-P) PRACTICUM


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

The Coding Specialist – Physician-based (CCS-P) serves a key role in the medical office, clinic or hospital setting. CCS-Ps are coding practitioners who specialize in physician-based settings such as physician offices, group practices, multi-specialty clinics, or specialty centers. They review patient records and possess in-depth knowledge of the CPT coding system and familiarity with the ICD-9-CM and HCPCS Level II coding systems. They are experts in health information documentation, data integrity, and quality and play a critical role in a health provider’s business operations for data submitted to insurance companies or the government for expense reimbursement. The new concepts in the ICD-10-CM system will be included.

 
Prerequisite: Student must have completed all of the curriculum in the Coding Specialist – Physician-based (CCS-P) program with a minimum of 2.0 in each theory class
 
 

General Requirements:

  1. The externship is to extend over a 15 week period.
  2. It is the student’s responsibility to negotiate a mutually acceptable work schedule with the agency.
  3. The student and externship supervisor will determine, with the supervisor at the work stations, the duties and requirements of the externship experience.
  4. At least 75% of your major coursework is completed, as determined by the externship supervisor, with an overall 2.5 GPA or above. Except in the Allied Health programs where 100% of coursework must be completed.

 

Procedure for Enrollment:

  1. An externship must be planned a semester in advance of registration and has the same drop/add deadline date as any other course beginning on the first day of the semester. Externship credit may not be granted on a retroactive basis.
  2. A student will need to meet with the externship supervisor to obtain approval and necessary forms.
  3. The student must complete an externship application, submit a resume and obtain 3 faculty recommendations from current or former instructors in your major area.
  4. Determine with the employer/supervisor a mutually acceptable work schedule, written objectives/duties of the job (signed by both student and employer/supervisor) and a start and finish date. You must turn in verification of hours worked and a completed student evaluation of the extern experience to the externship supervisor.
  5. After acceptance by the externship supervisor and the agency involved, and after returning to the externship supervisor the completed externship Learning Contract, a student may then officially register and begin the course.

ALH 281 MEDICAL ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST PRACTICUM


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

The Medical Administrative Specialist serves a key role in the medical office, clinic or hospital setting. This multi-skilled practitioner is competent in medical records management, insurance processing, coding and billing, management of practice finances, information processing, and fundamental office tasks. The practitioner maintains familiarity with clinical and technical concepts of coordinate administrative office functions in the health care setting. This program is approved by American Medical Technologists (AMT is accredited by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies NCCA) as a program of study for those who wish to sit for the Certified Medical Administrative Specialist – CMAS (AMT).

 
Prerequisite: Student must have completed all of the curriculum in the Medical Administrative Specialist Certificate program with a minimum of 2.0 in each theory class and an overall GPA of 2.5
 
 

General Requirements:

  1. The externship is to extend over a 15 week period.
  2. It is the student’s responsibility to negotiate a mutually acceptable work schedule with the agency.
  3. The student and externship supervisor will determine, with the supervisor at the work stations, the duties and requirements of the externship experience.
  4. At least 75% of your major coursework is completed, as determined by the externship supervisor, with an overall 2.5 GPA or above. Except in the Allied Health programs where 100% of coursework must be completed.

 

Procedure for Enrollment:

  1. An externship must be planned a semester in advance of registration and has the same drop/add deadline date as any other course beginning on the first day of the semester. Externship credit may not be granted on a retroactive basis.
  2. A student will need to meet with the externship supervisor to obtain approval and necessary forms.
  3. The student must complete an externship application, submit a resume and obtain 3 faculty recommendations from current or former instructors in your major area.
  4. Determine with the employer/supervisor a mutually acceptable work schedule, written objectives/duties of the job (signed by both student and employer/supervisor) and a start and finish date. You must turn in verification of hours worked and a completed student evaluation of the extern experience to the externship supervisor.
  5. After acceptance by the externship supervisor and the agency involved, and after returning to the externship supervisor the completed externship Learning Contract, a student may then officially register and begin the course.

ALH 285 PHLEBOTOMY TECHNICIAN PRACTICUM


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

The Phlebotomy Technician Practicum focuses first on laboratory skills within the clinical setting. It is intended to provide the student with experience in the work environment in the laboratory of a CLIA Waived medical office or a hospital based laboratory. The practicum requires 100 clinical hours, at a class seminar, for a total of 12 hours. This is an unpaid educational work experience to be taken after all other coursework in the program has been successfully completed. After completion of the practicum the student may apply to the American Society of Clinical Pathology (ASCP) to write the Phlebotomy Technician (PBT) exam.

Prerequisite: Student must have completed all of the curriculum in the Phlebotomy Certificate program with a minimum of 2.0 GPA in each theory class; a minimum of 2.5 in the clinical course, ALH 230, and an overall GPA of 2.5. This course must be taken the semester following the completion of all program coursework at the latest or the student may be required to retake ALH 230.
 
 

General Requirements:

  1. The externship is to extend over a 15 week period.
  2. It is the student’s responsibility to negotiate a mutually acceptable work schedule with the agency.
  3. The student and externship supervisor will determine, with the supervisor at the work stations, the duties and requirements of the externship experience.
  4. At least 75% of your major coursework is completed, as determined by the externship supervisor, with an overall 2.5 GPA or above. Except in the Allied Health programs where 100% of coursework must be completed.

 

Procedure for Enrollment:

  1. An externship must be planned a semester in advance of registration and has the same drop/add deadline date as any other course beginning on the first day of the semester. Externship credit may not be granted on a retroactive basis.
  2. A student will need to meet with the externship supervisor to obtain approval and necessary forms.
  3. The student must complete an externship application, submit a resume and obtain 3 faculty recommendations from current or former instructors in your major area.
  4. Determine with the employer/supervisor a mutually acceptable work schedule, written objectives/duties of the job (signed by both student and employer/supervisor) and a start and finish date. You must turn in verification of hours worked and a completed student evaluation of the extern experience to the externship supervisor.
  5. After acceptance by the externship supervisor and the agency involved, and after returning to the externship supervisor the completed externship Learning Contract, a student may then officially register and begin the cours

ALH 290 MEDICAL ASSISTANT CERTIFICATION EXAM REVIEW


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is designed to review the entire Medical Assistant program in preparation for the National Certified Medical Assisting Examination.

 
Prerequisite: Completion of all courses in the Medical Assistant program, except ALH 238. Must be taken in last semester of Medical Assistant program and concurrently with ALH 238

 

ANTHROPOLOGY

(ANTH formerly SSA)

ANTH 201 INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is intended to introduce students to the field of anthropology and to provide them with an understanding of the theoretical perspectives and methodological strategies used in the study of traditional and contemporary socio-cultural systems found throughout the world. Special attention will be given to the basic concept of “culture” and to the nature and inter- relationship of particular cultures with their environments. This course is designed to assist students in developing the skills needed to critically analyze anthropological data and to prepare them to pursue further study in the discipline.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121

 

ART

(ART formerly HUA)

ART 100 ART APPRECIATION


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

A course designed to acquaint the student with the terminology, materials and goals of the artist through lecture, field trips and guest speakers.

 
Prerequisite: Placement beyond or satisfactory completion of ENG 063 and ENG 073

ART 104 OBJECT DRAWING


3 Credits, 5 Contacts

This course focuses on freehand drawing from direct observation. Students learn drawing techniques, methods, linear perspective, and compositional skills. The properties of line, value, texture, shape and space are dealt with as elemental to the drawing process. Drawing will be explored as a vehicle for thinking, seeing and communicating. An ability to render and draw expressively in a variety of materials is stressed.

 
Prerequisite: None

ART 105 DRAWING STUDIO


3 Credits, 5 Contacts

This course focuses on the drawing experience as a means of creative problem solving. Different types of image-making processes are studied and evaluated as a means of effective communication. Students learn to invent from observation and imagination.

 
Prerequisite: None

ART 107 TWO-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN


3 Credits, 5 Contacts

This course focuses on the elements of design in visual expression. Emphasis is placed on two-dimensional problem solving, organization of visual elements, and color theory. These elements will be explored using a variety of materials and methods. The student will be prepared to explore fine art or commercial design.

 
Prerequisite: None

ART 108 THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN


3 Credits, 5 Contacts

This course focuses on the elements of design in sculpture and spatial arrangement. Emphasis is placed on three-dimensional problem solving and organization of form in space. These elements will be explored using a variety of materials and methods. The student will be prepared to explore fine art or commercial design.

 
Prerequisite: None

ART 115 INTRODUCTION TO GRAPHIC DESIGN


3 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course will introduce the various aspects of the graphic design field. Topics include visual communication theory and practice, an overview of typography, spatial relationships and the potential areas of specialized and employment.

 
Prerequisite: None

ART 116 COLOR THEORY FOR GRAPHIC DESIGN


3 Credits, 4 Contacts

This class will cover the theory of color with special emphasis on the unique color theories used in print and web application. The class will introduce the importance and use of color in all dimensions of commercial art and graphic design. The focus will be on practical assignments related to commercial projects.

 
Prerequisite: None

Co-Requisite: ART 115

ART 151 CERAMICS I


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

Devoted to a survey of pottery processes including hand-building, technical information and a limited experience with the potters wheel.

 
Prerequisite: None

ART 160 BEGINNING PHOTOGRAPHY: DIGITAL


3 Credits, 4 Contacts

This is an introductory course in the processing and camera techniques of 35mm photography and will explore digital techniques. Emphasis is placed on basic photo composition, lighting, camera usage, darkroom techniques and procedures. The course accommodates both those who want to explore photography as a profession and those who want to improve their photographic skills.

 
Prerequisite: None

Note: Student must have Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) camera, camera phone is not acceptable.

Students will be responsible to provide their own digital camera for coursework.

ART 170 IMAGE MANIPULATION: PHOTOSHOP


3 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course will explore the spectrum of image input into the digital format, manipulation of the image and the desired output using Adobe Photoshop. This class will be accessible to the beginning student and those pursuing graphic design or fine art application.

 
Prerequisite: None

ART 172 DIGITAL ILLUSTRATION


3 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course explores the basics of illustration using Adobe Illustrator and relevant computer hardware. Digital illustration will be used as a tool to create brochures, labels and packaging as well as fine art applications. Emphasis will be placed on creating audience appropriate illustrations.

 
Prerequisite: ART 104

Co-Requisite: ART 115

ART 210 LIFE DRAWING


3 Credits, 5 Contacts

This course focuses on drawing the human form from live models and the study of anatomy. The student will explore skeletal, muscular, and surface anatomy, as well as the essential aspects of life drawing (such as gesture, contour, proportion, structure and articulation).

 
Prerequisite: ART 104 and ART 107

ART 220 HISTORY OF ART I


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is a historical survey of art from prehistory to the Renaissance. Art will be explored in the context of the culture in which it was created and the perspective of the artists. An exploration of the principles and practices of the artistic disciplines will enhance understanding of the art that will be covered.

 
Prerequisite: Placement beyond or satisfactory completion of ENG 063 and ENG 073

ART 221 HISTORY OF ART II


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is a historical survey of art from the Renaissance to present day. Art will be explored in the context of the culture in which it was created and the perspective of the artists. An exploration of the principles and practices of the artistic disciplines will enhance understanding of the art that will be covered.

 
Prerequisite: Placement beyond or satisfactory completion of ENG 063 and ENG 073

ART 231 SCULPTURE


3 Credits, 5 Contacts

This is an introductory course in sculpture which will explore the theories and concepts of three-dimensional art forms in space. Mechanical, structural and compositional principles will be studied. A variety of sculptural techniques and materials will be used.

 
Prerequisite: None

ART 240 PAINTING


3 Credits, 5 Contacts

This is an introductory course in painting, which will prepare the student to realize visual observations and find personal expression through painting media. The class will explore oil, acrylic, watercolor and tempera painting techniques. Emphasis will be placed on learning to see and mix color, as well as the use of color in composition. A survey of historical painting styles and techniques will be included.

 
Prerequisites: None

ART 241 PRINTMAKING: INTAGLIO AND RELIEF


3 Credits, 5 Contacts

This course is an introduction to the print techniques of etching, aquatint, dry point, woodcut, and linoleum cut. The student will have opportunity to prepare plates and blocks for printing. All aspects of the printing process will be covered. A survey of print aesthetics will also be included.

 
Prerequisite: None

ART 242 WATERCOLOR I


3 Credits, 5 Contacts

This course is a survey of the application, techniques, and limitations of watercolor as a representational painting medium. Students will experiment with a variety of traditional and contemporary watercolor processes. Included will be a survey of historical use of watercolor in fine art.

 
Prerequisite: None

ART 243 WATERCOLOR II


3 Credits, 5 Contacts

This is an advanced course in the application, techniques, and limitations of watercolor as a representational painting medium. Students will further experiment with a variety of traditional and contemporary watercolor processes. Included will be a survey of historical use of watercolor in fine art.

 
Prerequisite: ART 242

ART 244 OIL PAINTING I


3 Credits, 5 Contacts

This is an introductory course in oil painting which will examine the traditional oil painting techniques of imprimitura, under-painting, over- painting and glazing. Oil painting materials, pigments, and mediums will be explored in depth. Included will be a survey of the historical and contemporary use of oil paint in fine art.

 
Prerequisite: None

ART 245 OIL PAINTING II


3 Credits, 5 Contacts

This is an advanced course in oil painting which will further examine the traditional oil painting techniques of imprimatur, under-painting, over-painting, and glazing. Oil painting materials, pigments, and mediums will be explored in depth. Included will be a survey of the historical and contemporary use of oil paint in fine art.

 
Prerequisite: ART 244

ART 246 PRINTMAKING: SILK SCREEN


3 Credits, 5 Contacts

This course is an introduction to silkscreen painting techniques. The student will have opportunity to prepare screens for printing using manual and light sensitive masking techniques. All aspects of the screen printing process will be covered. A survey of print aesthetics will also be included.

 
Prerequisite: None

ART 252 PASTEL I


3 Credits, 5 Contacts

This is an introductory course in pastel painting. The materials, pigments, and techniques of pastel will be explored in depth. The class will also cover the technique of making soft pastels by hand.

 
Prerequisite: ART 104 or ART 105 or ART 107 and ART 240

ART 253 PASTEL II


3 Credits, 5 Contacts

This is an advanced course in pastel painting. The materials, pigments, and techniques of pastel will be explored in depth. An emphasis will be placed on techniques for painting detailed realism.

 
Prerequisite: ART 104 or ART 105 or ART 107 and ART 240 and ART 252

ART 260 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY: COMMERCIAL AND FINE ART


3 Credits, 4 Contacts

This class will expand on the material covered in Beginning Photography and will give the student practical experience in portrait, product, and location photography with emphasis on professional photographic processes that are applicable to both the fine art and commercial photographer. Both the photographic studio and off site locations will be utilized for student work.

 
Prerequisite: ART 160 and ART 170

Note: Student must have Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) camera, camera phone is not acceptable.

Students will be responsible to provide their own digital camera for coursework

ART 271 GRAPHIC DESIGN INTERNSHIP


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

A course designed to give on-the-job experience that is commensurate with the student’s career objectives. It’s intended to provide the student with practical experience in a professional work environment. Internships vary in length but or normally for one semester after 75% of the coursework is completed. Required are 135 to 240 hours of on-the-job experience, plus attendance in a scheduled seminar. A completed GOCC internship application is required for consideration.

 
Corequisite: ART 274, ART 276, ART 290

Prerequisite: ART 115, ART 116, ART 170, and ART 172 or permission from instructor.

ART 274 TYPOGRAPHY


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is designed to introduce students to the basics of typography and the use of type in graphic design and visual communication. The class covers type and the letterforms as fundamental and aesthetic elements of visual design. This course uses traditional and digital media.

 
Prerequisite: ART 115

ART 276 ADVERTISING DESIGN


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is designed to give practical insight into the discipline of marketing and how it applies to the creative process within advertising agencies to create effective, integrated advertising campaigns for diverse markets and media. Advertising strategy based on media and marketing realities will be investigated and applied. Students will learn about the basic role and responsibilities of the art director/designer and how they influence and guide how products and services are brought to market.

 
Prerequisite: ART 115 and BUS 153

ART/CIS 280 WEB DESIGN WITH ADOBE DREAMWEAVER


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course will give the students a solid understanding of web design principles using Adobe Dreamweaver. Students will learn and configure the Dreamweaver environment, and use Dreamweaver to plan, create, and maintain website projects. Students will also learn how to format text, manage images, and use CSS for positioning objectives and controlling layout. Students will learn more advanced topics like rich media, spray elements, and database functionality. Throughout the course, students will be exposed to web design concepts including: Web Typography, color and graphic usage, page layout, navigation, usability, and designing webpages for various display media.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 100 and CIS 101

ART 290 ART PORTFOLIO


2 Credits, 2 Contacts

This is a capstone course for the Associate of Arts in Visual Art degree. In this course the student will create a portfolio of their work in preparation for submission to potential employers, galleries, or schools. The student will work individually with the instructor to select representative pieces of their work, design the presentation and produce the final portfolio in both digital and traditional media. The successful completion of this course is necessary to receive the Associate of Arts in Visual Arts degree.

 
Prerequisite: Completion of all but the last semester of the appropriate emphasis with the Associate of Arts in Visual Art degree program.

 

AUTOMOTIVE

(AUTO formerly VTA)

AUTO 100 INTRODUCTION TO AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course provides knowledge about safety and an introduction to other areas of automotive repair. This course will focus primarily on safety issues in the auto shop and tool usage. Vehicle maintenance and inspection and minor repairs will be performed.

 
Prerequisite: None

AUTO 141 ENGINE DIAGNOSIS AND IGNITION SYSTEMS


5 Credits, 6 Contacts

This course provides the skills to test engine condition and ignition systems. Students will use vacuum, compression, cylinder leakage, and electronic engine analyzers. Students will learn how to diagnose an on–board computer system and its components for proper operation. The operation, testing and repair of ignition system components will be practiced.

 
Prerequisite: AUTO 100 or permission from instructor

AUTO 142 FUEL AND EXHAUST SYSTEMS


5 Credits, 6 Contacts

This course provides the skills to test and repair fuel systems. Students will diagnose and service components used for fuel flow control, the fuel tank, fuel pumps, injectors, carburetors, throttle bodies and filters. Exhaust systems will be inspected, serviced and repaired by students.

 
Prerequisite: AUTO 100 and AUTO 141 or permission from instructor

AUTO 146 AUTOMOTIVE BRAKING SYSTEMS


4 Credits, 6 Contacts

This introductory course teaches theory, service and repair of automotive braking systems and their components. Emphasis is given to hydraulic theory, repair, and service of system components, including anti-lock and traction control systems.

 
Prerequisite: AUTO 100 or permission from instructor

AUTO 221 AUTOMOTIVE STEERING AND SUSPENSION


4 Credits, 6 Contacts

This course provides an in depth study of the various mechanical and electronic steering and suspension systems used on today’s vehicles. Focus will be placed on the theory and operation as well as the diagnosis and repair of steering and suspension system components including wheel alignment. This course will also cover tire diagnosis and repair and includes dynamic wheel balancing. The course will emphasize professional methods of diagnosis and repair for related components.

 
Prerequisite: AUTO 100 or permission from instructor

AUTO 225 AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS I


4 Credits, 6 Contacts

The first of two electrical classes introduces the fundamentals of electricity and automotive electronics. Digital multi-meters and circuit troubleshooting is covered. Emphasis is placed on understanding and utilizing electrical diagrams. Batteries, starting and charging systems are covered.

 
Prerequisite: AUTO 100 or permission from instructor

AUTO 226 AUTOMOTIVE HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is designed as an introduction to the basics of air conditioning. Description, theory, operation, servicing, repair and diagnosis are all covered. The design and operation of the cooling system and its repair and service will also be studied.

 
Prerequisite: None

AUTO 228 AUTOMOTIVE EMISSION SYSTEMS


5 Credits, 5 Contacts

This course explains the operation of the emission control systems. Students will diagnose and service PCV, EGR AND air management and fuel vapor systems. This is the last of the engine performance classes and will include review testing to prepare for the State Certification Test.

 
Prerequisite: AUTO 100 or permission from instructor

AUTO 245 AUTOMOTIVE VALVE TRAIN AND HEAD REBUILDING


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course examines the way the internal combustion works and how the parts interact. The testing of engine condition will be demonstrated. Engine removal installation proper disassembly, cleaning and inspection of parts will be emphasized. The machining of valves and seats will be demonstrated. This is the first of two classes intended to prepare a student for engine repair certification tests.

 
Prerequisite: AUTO 100

AUTO 246 AUTOMOTIVE CYLINDER BLOCK REBUILDING


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course examines engine block diagnosis, repair and reassembly. The measurement and service of cylinders, crankshafts, piston and connecting rods will be demonstrated. Engine lubrication systems, cooling systems and proper installation of the completed engine assembly will be emphasized. The is the second of two classes intended to prepare a student for engine repair certification tests.

 
Prerequisite: AUTO 100

Recommended: AUTO 245

AUTO 250 INTRODUCTION TO TRANSMISSIONS


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

A study of drivelines, manual and automatic transmission theory of operation, diagnosis, testing, and repair procedures. Theory and diagnosis of computer-controlled transmissions will also be covered.

 
Prerequisite: AUTO 100 or permission from instructor

AUTO 251 MANUAL TRANSMISSIONS AND TRANSAXLES


4 Credits, 6 Contacts

This course provides students with skills to needed diagnose and repair manual transmissions/transaxles. Axle assemblies and all wheel manual drives will be covered. This is the second class intended to prepare a student for Manual Drive Train and Axles certification tests.

 
Prerequisite: AUTO 100 and AUTO 250

AUTO 252 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS AND TRANSAXLES


5 Credits, 6 Contacts

This course provides students with skills to needed to diagnose and repair automatic transmissions/transaxles. This class intended to prepare a student for Automatic Transmission and Transaxle certification tests.

 
Prerequisite: AUTO 100 and AUTO 250

AUTO 255 AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS II


4 Credits, 7 Contacts

This course provides students the skills to diagnosis and repair electrical systems, circuits and components. The diagnosing and testing of automotive lighting systems will be covered. Students will learn to perform tests and repairs on gauges, warning devices, horns, wiper washer/washer systems and most other accessories. This is the second of two electrical classes intended to prepare a student for electronical/electronic systems certification tests.

 
Prerequisite: AUTO 100 or permission from instructor

 

BIOLOGY

(BIO formerly NSA, NSB)

BIO 101 HUMAN BIOLOGY


4 Credits, 6 Contacts

This lecture-laboratory course involves the study of the structure and function of cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems of the human body. Such basic scientific principles as cell biology and genetics are included.

 
Prerequisite: ALH 218 or taken concurrently

BIO 110 BIOLOGICAL FORM AND FUNCTION


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

The course covers basic concepts of anatomy and physiology of plants and animals. By the end of this non-lab course students will be able to understand the language of anatomy and physiology used to describe the functions of plants and animals. It also introduces students to the role of organ systems in maintaining homeostasis in plants and animals. By the end of this course the student will also understand the common set of functional features that all living systems contain.

 
Prerequisites: MATH 055B, ENG 121, one year of high school biology or BIO 120

BIO 120 BIOLOGY


4 Credits, 5 Contacts

An introductory survey course covering the major principles and unifying theories of biology. This course will provide the beginning student with a basic understanding of biological principles encompassing basic biochemistry, cell biology, cell division, genetics, diversity and evolution and ecology. This is a lecture/laboratory combination course and is designed to meet the needs of students with limited science background.

 
Prerequisite: Placement beyond or satisfactory completion of ENG 063 and ENG 073

BIO 121 GENERAL BIOLOGY I


4 Credits, 5 Contacts

A general study of the principles and processes of biology and the nature of biological investigation, with emphasis on cellular biology, respiration, photosynthesis and genetics. This course, together with NSB 122 General Biology, provides a basic background for further work in the biological sciences.

 
Prerequisite: Placement beyond or satisfactory completion of ENG 063 and ENG 073 and BIO 120 or one year of high school biology and either MATH 100 concurrently or placement into MATH 104 or equivalent college course.

BIO 122 GENERAL BIOLOGY II


4 Credits, 5 Contacts

A general study of the principles and processes of biology and the nature of biological investigation, with emphasis on evolution, speciation, ecology and the diversity of life (includes taxonomy and classifications of organisms). Laboratory investigations coordinated with lecture topics.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 073 and BIO 120 or one year of high school biology; ENG 121 is highly recommended prior to or concurrently with this course.

BIO 125 ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

Designed for students who plan on pursuing a higher degree. This course is an introduction to environmental studies through a survey of environmental topics in which the students will explore human relationships with the environment and the resulting changes. Students will also examine the different approaches used to understand and solve environmental problems facing us today. The course is reading and writing intensive, requiring a written research paper using credible scientific journals as source information.

 
Prerequisite: Placement beyond or satisfactory completion of ENG 063 and ENG 073

BIO 201 ECOLOGY


4 Credits, 5 Contacts

This course introduces the basic principles of ecology at the individual, population, and community levels emphasizing the characteristic ecosystems in southwest Michigan. Other topics will include the role of biotic and abiotic components and their influence on the distribution and abundance of organisms. It will also study the dynamics of population growth and species interactions (predation, competition, mutualism, etc.) at the community level. The course will also explore issues at the planetary level by studying the structure of ecological communities, ecological succession, and the applications of ecology to the problems of environment and resource management.

 
Prerequisite: BIO 121, BIO 122 or permission of the instructor/professor.

BIO 210 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I


4 Credits, 6 Contacts

This is the first in a sequence of two intensive anatomy and physiology courses intending to cover the human body as an integrated whole by examining the structures and functions of each body system as well as some of the common diseases associated with each system. Integration of the body’s systems is emphasized by examining how each of these systems interacts with the body’s other systems in order to maintain homeostasis. Laboratory activities will include dissections, computer labs, anatomical models, and brief scientific experimentation. Study within this course includes general chemistry principles, biochemistry, cells, tissues, and the following systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, special senses, and endocrine. It is recommended, but not required, that students take Medical Terminology before or along with this class as this can help students absorb the large amount of new terminology associated with Anatomy & Physiology.

 
Prerequisite: High school Chemistry or CHEM 130 Chemistry (grade of 2.0 or better), placement into ENG 121 English Composition I, and successful completion (grade of 2.0 or better) of BIO 121 General Biology I

BIO 211 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II


4 Credits, 6 Contacts

This is the second in a sequence of two intensive anatomy and physiology courses intending to cover the human body as an integrated whole by examining the structures and functions of each body system as well as some of the common diseases associated with each system. Integration of the body’s systems is emphasized by examining how each of these systems interacts with the body’s other systems in order to maintain homeostasis. Laboratory activities will include dissections, computer labs, anatomical models, and brief scientific experimentation. Study within this course includes the following systems: cardiovascular (including blood), lymphatic and immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive.

 
Prerequisite: Successful completion (2.0 or better) in BIO 210

BIO 212 PATHOPHYSIOLOGY


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This is an intensive course geared toward present and future health care professionals intending to cover how human physiology is altered in various major disease states.

 
Prerequisite: BIO 210 or BIO 211

BIO 220 GENERAL GENETICS


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is designed to take the student in a “tour” through the basic concepts of Mendelian and molecular genetics. From the works of Gregor Mendel to the modern concepts that define the field of genetics, the student will learn how genes are transmitted (inheritance), expressed, and regulated at the cellular level, the organismal level and the population level. The emphasis of this course will be the integration of basic concepts and analytical thinking to ensure student understanding of the principles and mechanisms of genetics. The course will be delivered through a combination of interactive lectures and group discussions, along with problem solving exercises and online assignments designed to increase critical thinking.

 
Prerequisite: BIO 121, CHEM 133

BIO 230 MICROBIOLOGY


4 Credits, 6 Contacts

This is an introduction to general microbiology. Topics include general properties of bacteria, viruses and eukaryotic parasites, disinfection, sterilization, sources and means of infection, infectious diseases and immunity. This is a lecture/laboratory combination course designed with a focus in nursing and health-related careers. In the laboratory, students will isolate, propagate and study morphological and physiological characteristics of both pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms.

 
Pre-requisites: Successful completion of (minimum grade of 2.0) BIO 121 AND CHEM 130.

BIO 275 BIOLOGY RESEARCH PROJECT


2 Credits, 2 Contacts

The Biology Research Project is a capstone experience in Biology for the student seeking an Associate of Science Degree. In this course the student will work with an instructor to design and conduct an experiment or investigation. The course will allow the student to bring together their college course experiences in science, mathematics, and communications while pursuing advanced work in an area of their own interest. The evaluation of the student will be determined by the instructor, the Science Department, and the Dean of the College.

 
Prerequisite: Placement beyond or satisfactory completion of ENG 063 and ENG 073 and permission of the instructor/professor.

BIO 990 BIOLOGICAL FIELD STUDIES


2 Credits, 2 Contacts

The course will offer students the opportunity to research a question or problem in the field of biology. The student will propose research ideas, design experiments and conduct research, and report results in the same way as any scientist would. Scientific ethics and the related social issues of science will be considered prior to any experiments. Topics will vary and students may repeat this course for credit.

 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor/professor

 

BUSINESS

(BUS formerly BAC, BAD, BAM, BIP)

BUS 100 KEYBOARDING-INTRODUCTION


2 Credits, 2 Contacts

This course is designed for students with few or no keyboarding skills. Areas of study include definition and use of all keys on a computer keyboard, building a typing speed of 20 Words Per Minute, entering data using the numeric keypad, and beginning document formatting. This course is also useful for those wishing to transition from typewriter to computer keyboard for word processing. (Students who have successfully completed a high school keyboarding class should take BUS 121 Intermediate Keyboarding.)

 
Prerequisite: None

BUS 101 COLLEGE SKILLS AND PORTFOLIO WRITING


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is designed to give students the skills required to be successful in both academic and career endeavors. Areas of concentration are portfolio writing, self-assessment, skills in listening, note taking, improving test scores and time management, self-esteem, goal setting and educational development plans. The portfolio writing is especially useful for students intending to transfer to a university or preparing for employment interviews. This course is a required course for anyone wishing to earn either a certificate or degree in the business area.

 
Prerequisite: None

BUS 102 KEYBOARDING-REFRESHER


2 Credits, 2 Contacts

This course is designed for students who know how to key but feel that their accuracy and speed skills need to be improved. Students will work on gaining accuracy and speed. Areas of study include: building a keying speed of 30 Words Per Minute for five minutes, entering data using the numeric keypad, and beginning document formatting. This course is also useful for those wishing to transition from typewriter to computer keyboard for word processing. (Students who have successfully completed a high school keyboarding class and have a keying speed in excess of 30 words per minute with minimal errors should take BUS 121 Intermediate Keyboarding.)

 
Prerequisite: BUS 100 Keyboarding-Introduction or the ability to key 30 words per minute with 3 or fewer errors.

BUS 104 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is designed as a survey of American business and industry. Emphasis will be placed on the understanding of business terminology and internal/external structures and their relationship to individuals, business and society. Past, present, and future business trends will be studied providing students the foundational knowledge required to progress to upper level business courses.

 
Prerequisite: Placement beyond or satisfactory completion of ENG 063 and ENG 073

BUS 105 BUSINESS MATHEMATICAL APPLICATIONS


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is designed to provide the student with a practical knowledge of typical mathematical concepts and calculations performed in the business environment. Emphasis is placed upon the introduction and understanding of mathematical concepts as applied in various business situations, formation and execution of applicable calculations, problem solving, and interpretation of results in reaching appropriate business decisions. This basic application of business concepts is extended to more complex decision-making with multiple variables and complex algebraic functions as they apply to business decisions. Utilization of graphing and modeling will help students improve their decision making ability in the ever changing and complex business environment. Problem solving will involve the integration and the use of a calculator.

 
Prerequisite: Placement into ENG 063 and ENG 073 and MATH 100

BUS 110 FOUNDATIONS OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP


2 Credits, 2 Contacts

This course is designed to provide an overview of small business and what is necessary to start a small business: Including small business in free enterprise, the entrepreneur, opportunities and trends, business plan, legal aspects, financing, organizational planning and marketing.

 
Prerequisite: Placement beyond or satisfactory completion of ENG 063 and ENG 073

BUS 111 CONTEMPORARY BUSINESS AND TECHNICAL COMMUNICATIONS


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is designed for business and technical students, and for people already in the work force who need a more practical, hands-on approach in business communications. It will connect topics, examples, and exercises of communication to the modern workplace. Students will develop their oral and written skills, and innovations in modern communication technologies.

 
Prerequisite: Placement beyond or satisfactory completion of ENG 063 and ENG 073

BUS 121 INTERMEDIATE KEYBOARDING


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

An intermediate course in keyboarding for students who type 30 words a minute. The course concentrates on mailable production of common business forms and correspondence using current word software.

 
Prerequisite: BUS 100 or BUS 102 or successful completion of one year of high school keyboarding or CIS 101.

BUS 151 FUNDAMENTALS OF SELLING


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

An introduction to the principles of selling. Includes study of selling in our present economy, analysis of the steps in a sales demonstration, and classroom sales presentations by students.

 
Prerequisite: BUS 104

BUS 153 ADVERTISING


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is intended to give the business major a comprehensive view of American advertising. A brief-study is made of advertising in the economy, in society and in business. An analysis is made of the principles and practices used in various types of advertising, such as newspapers, television, radio, direct mail and the internet.

 
Prerequisite: BUS 104

BUS 200 PRINCIPLES OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is designed to strengthen the entrepreneurial and management skills of those who are already in (or who may enter) business for themselves. This course uses small business case studies extensively.

 
Prerequisite: BUS 110

BUS 205 BUSINESS STATISTICS


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

An introductory course emphasizing the statistical analysis of business and economic data and how this analysis aids in planning and controlling operations and in making sound business decisions.

 
Prerequisite: MATH 117 or MATH 151 and MATH 201

BUS 221 ADVANCED KEYBOARDING-LEGAL


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

A production keyboarding course for students who have elected to specialize in the legal office. Emphasis is placed on acquiring an employable timed writing speed and developing production techniques using word processing software. The legal course includes practice using legal terms and forms used in a legal office. The student should be keying approximately 45 wpm when entering this course.

 
Prerequisite: BUS 121, CIS 101 or high school experience and CIS 233

BUS 222 ADVANCED KEYBOARDING – MEDICAL


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

A production keyboarding course for students who have elected to specialize in the medical office. Emphasis is placed on acquiring an employable times writing speed and developing production techniques using word processing software. The medical course also includes using a medical software as found in medical facilities. The student should be keying approximately 45 wpm when entering this course.

 
Prerequisite: BUS 121 and CIS 233

BUS 250 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

A study of the dynamic forces operating in the business activity known as marketing includes all business activities dealing with the distribution of goods from the time they leave the factory or field until they reach the consumer. Marketing presents the actual processes market in an analytical and descriptive style. Analyze the ramifications of economics, politics, society, competition and technology on both the consumer and the business.

 
Prerequisite: BUS 104

BUS 251 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course examines individual, interpersonal, group and organizational processes. Students will discuss current theory, research and practice with regards to human behavior in the work place. Areas of concentration are goal setting, communication, team processes, motivational theory and techniques, culture, ethics, managing organizational change and conflict resolution.

 
Prerequisite: BUS 104

BUS 252 INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

The course is intended to give the business major an understanding of management concepts and activities. A study will be made of the following basic fundamentals: planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Selected managerial areas, such as team work, ethics and decision making, will also be introduced. The course is designed to furnish a strong foundation in management for management trainees or business transfer students.

 
Prerequisite: BUS 104

BUS 253 SUPERVISION


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is an overview of basic leadership skills needed to effectively supervise people with emphasis on productive communications, human relations issues, and the supervisor’s role in employee recruitment, selection, training, motivation, planning, and evaluations as well as contemporary concerns of the supervisor.

 
Prerequisite: BUS 104

BUS 255 BUSINESS LAW


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

An introduction to the fundamental principles of law which the prospective businessperson will encounter in his/her business activities. A presentation of laws pertaining to contracts, agencies and effects of the uniform commercial code, as well as pre-code law. Basic principles applicable to business including legal rights and remedies, contracts and agency employer and employee relations is an intrinsic part of the course.

 
Prerequisite: Placement beyond or satisfactory completion of ENG 063 and ENG 073

BUS 260 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

Designed for small business managers, this course utilizes an analytical approach that embodies sound business principles. The course deals with sales, production, purchasing, personnel and finance. Also covered are the managerial functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Case problems and business plan writing as related to small business will be discussed.

 
Prerequisite: BUS 105

BUS 281 ACCOUNTING PRACTICUM


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This class will prepare students for the Certified Bookkeeper (CB) Designation exam, which is nationally recognized test that assures the level of knowledge and skills needed to carry out all the key functions through adjusted trial balance, including basic payroll, for firms. This exam is administered through the American Institute of Professional Bookkeepers (AIPB). This class is a stand-alone class covering the following accounting functions: accruals, deferred expenses, adjustments, corrections, bank reconciliation, payroll, depreciation, inventory, internal controls, and fraud. This class will serve as a capstone class for the Accounting Certificate.

 
Pre-requisite: ACCT 100, ACCT 109, ACCT 111, ACCT 112, ACCT 113, ACCT 204, ACCT 213

BUS 282 MARKETING PRACTICUM


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This class is a capstone class in Marketing. It will prepare students in several areas of Marketing to include the following: Marketing Research, Social Media, Networking, Sales, and Career Development. The practical application of this material in Marketing will allow students to go beyond this class to achieve American Marketing Association (AMA) Collegiate Certification Programs for students. This certification is not included in this class but will be available in conjunction with this class. These certifications must be completed beyond the class requirements, and will be issued from the AMA.

 
Pre-requisite: ACCT 100, ACCT 111, BUS 153, BUS 205

BUS 283 MANAGEMENT PRACTICUM


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This class will prepare students for the Foundations of Management (FoM) exam, which is a nationally recognized test designed for employees interested in transitioning to management or supervisory roles. This exam is administered though the Institute of Certified Professional Managers (ICPM). This class is a stand-alone course designed to help students integrate their understanding of the following components: Business Environment, Business Communications, Human Resources, Management, Supervision, and Accounting. This course is a capstone class for the Management/Supervision Certificate.

 
Pre-requisite: ACCT 100, ACCT 111, BUS 252, BUS 253

 

CHEMISTRY

(CHEM formerly NSC)

CHEM 130 CHEMISTRY


4 Credits, 5 Contacts

This is an introductory course for those students who have little or no background in chemistry as well as for those students whose program requires a minimum of hours in a laboratory science. This is a general survey course dealing primarily with fundamental principles of chemistry including measurements, atomic structure, nomenclature, balancing equations, stoichiometry, bonding, gases, thermodynamics, acids and bases.

 
Prerequisite: High school algebra or MATH 100 with a grade of 2.0 or higher or placement into MATH 104 or MATH 151 or equivalent college course.

CHEM 133 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I


4 Credits, 6 Contacts

This is an introductory laboratory college chemistry course emphasizing mathematical relationships in chemistry. Contents include chemical terminology, measurements, atomic theory, bonding, periodic table, nomenclature, stoichiometry, balancing equations, and thermochemistry.

 
Prerequisite: High school chemistry or CHEM 130 and either MATH 100 or placement into MATH 104 or equivalent college course.

CHEM 134 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II


4 Credits, 6 Contacts

A continuation of CHEM 133 General Chemistry I. Topics covered are bonding, states of matter, solution chemistry, gases, kinetics, equilibrium, acids/bases, precipitation reactions and nuclear chemistry. About one third of the laboratory deals with qualitative analysis.

 
Prerequisite: CHEM 133

CHEM 210 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY


4 Credits, 6 Contacts

This is a general organic chemistry course covering nomenclature, physical properties, and reactions involving alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cyclics, alkyl halides and dienes. Analysis will include an introduction to IR, NMR, and chromatography.

 
Prerequisite: CHEM 134

 

COMMUNICATIONS

(COM)

COM 110 INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

The course focuses upon developing speaking, verbal and nonverbal communication, and listening skills through individual assignments, presentations, demonstrations/role-playing and other projects.

 
Prerequisite: None

COM 140 GENERAL COMMUNICATIONS: SPEECH


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course provides a series of experiences that will aid in improving the ability to communicate orally in real-life situations. Emphasis will be on class discussions and various methods of presentations.

 
Prerequisite: None

COM 150 PUBLIC SPEAKING


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course presents the traditional rhetorical concepts of material, organization, delivery, creativity and persuasion. The student is expected to put into practice each one of the concepts by giving a variety of speeches.

 
Prerequisite: Placement beyond or satisfactory completion of ENG 063 and ENG 073

COM 280 PSYCHOLOGY OF SOCIAL MEDIA COMMUNICATIONS


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course will explore the history, growth and behavioral issues within social media. Through this class, students will learn the psychology behind social media communications, its application toward personal and professional development as well as how to create and maintain a social media presence. Social media venues such as Facebook, Google+, Snapchat, LinkedIn, YouTube, Pinterest, Instagram along with others will be integrated throughout this course.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 073 or equivalent placement score.

 

COMPUTER-AIDED DRAFTING AND DESIGN

(CADD)

CADD 215 BASIC AUTOCAD


3 Credits, 4 Contacts

This is an entry level course for students to learn basic drafting standards. AutoCAD software will be used throughout the course. Topics include; terminology, techniques, and applications of computer generated design as it relates to engineering, product design, and architecture.

 
Prerequisite: None

CADD 216 ADVANCED AUTOCAD


3 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is intended to introduce the aspects of Advanced Computer Aided Drafting Techniques using AutoCAD. AutoCAD software will be used throughout the course. Topics include; advanced terminology, techniques, and applications of computer generated design as it relates to engineering and product design.

 
Prerequisite: CADD 215

CADD 217 COMPUTER AIDED 3D MODELING – INVENTOR


3 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is intended to introduce the aspects of Advanced Computer Aided Drafting Techniques using Inventor and SolidWorks. Inventor and SolidWorks software will be used throughout the course. Topics include; advanced terminology, techniques, and applications of computer generated design as it relates to engineering and product design.

 
Prerequisite: CADD 215, CADD 216

CADD 218 COMPUTER AIDED 3D MODELING – SOLIDWORKS


3 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is intended to introduce the advanced aspects of 3D Modeling using SolidWorks. SolidWorks software will be used throughout the course. Topics include; advanced terminology, techniques, and applications of computer generated design as it relates to engineering and product design.

 
Prerequisite: CADD 217

CADD 219 ADVANCED COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING 3D MODELING


3 Credits, 4 Contacts

This is an advanced level course for students to learn 3D modeling using Inventor. Inventor software will be used throughout the course. Topics include; advanced terminology, techniques, and applications of computer generated design as it relates to engineering, and product design.

 
Prerequisite: CADD 217

CADD 220 ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING


3 Credits, 4 Contacts

This is a beginning level course for students to learn AutoCAD software to construct a set of architectural drawings used in construction. A full set of architectural construction documents will be completed. Students will learn basic terminology, techniques, and applications of computer generated design as it relates to architectural design.

 
Prerequisite: None

CADD 221 3D ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING


3 Credits, 4 Contacts

This is a beginning level course for students to learn AutoCAD software to construct a set of architectural drawings used in construction. A full set of architectural construction documents will be completed. Students will learn basic terminology, techniques, and applications of computer generated design as it relates to architectural design.

 
Prerequisite: CADD 215

CADD 222 DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY


3 Credits, 4 Contacts

This is a beginning level course for students to learn descriptive geometry. AutoCAD software will be used to construct a list of required drawings. Students will learn basic terminology, techniques, and applications of computer generated design as it relates to descriptive geometry.

 
Prerequisite: CADD 215

CADD 230 CADD CAPSTONE PROJECT


2 Credits, 2 Contacts

This is an advanced level course for students to create a final CAD project that will exemplify their knowledge of CAD. Students will select Inventor, Solidworks, or an architectural project to construct a list of required drawings. Students will learn advanced CAD terminology, techniques, and applications of computer generated design as it relates to final CAD project.

 
Pre-requisite: CADD 215, CADD 216, CADD 217, CADD 218 or CADD 219, CADD 220

 

COMPUTERS

(CIS formerly EDP)

CIS 100 USING THE INTERNET


1 Credits, 1 Contacts

This course will discuss topics giving students a general understanding of the Internet and its most used applications. The course will focus on the physical and logical makeup of the Internet and World Wide Web. In addition, e-mail management, browser usage, search engine strategies, and online security will be discussed.

 
Prerequisite: None

CIS 101 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS AND SOFTWARE


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

A survey course on computer concepts and applications associated with the current generation of computer technology. Students will study terminology as it applies to computers, networks, operating systems, and internet usage. This course includes a hands-on component where students will work with current productivity software such as Microsoft’s Word, Excel, and Access within the Windows operating system.

 
Prerequisite: None

CIS 102 CISCO I


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course introduces the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the Internet and other computer networks. The principles and structure of IP addressing and the fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations are introduced to provide a foundation for the curriculum. By the end of the course, students will be able to build simple LANs, perform basic configurations for routers and switches, and implement IP addressing schemes This is the first course in the a set of two to prepare students for the CCENT certification exam.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 101

CIS 103 CISCO II


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a small network. Students learn how to configure a router and a switch for basic functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with RIPv1, RIPng, single-area and multi-area OSPF, virtual LANs, and inter-VLAN routing in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 102

CIS 104 CISCO III


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course provides a comprehensive, theoretical, and practical approach to learning the technologies and protocols needed to design and implement a converged switched network. Students learn about the hierarchical network design model and how to select devices for each layer. The course explains how to configure a switch for basic functionality and how to implement Virtual LANs, VTP, and Inter-VLAN routing in a converged network. The different implementations of Spanning Tree Protocol in a converged network are presented, and students develop the knowledge and skills necessary to implement a WLAN in a small-to-medium network.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 103

CIS 105 CISCO IV


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course discusses the WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in enterprise networks. The course uses the Cisco Network Architecture to introduce integrated network services and explains how to select the appropriate devices and technologies to meet network requirements. Students learn how to implement and configure common data link protocols and how to apply WAN security concepts, principles of traffic, access control, and addressing services. Finally, students learn how to detect, troubleshoot, and correct common enterprise network implementation issues.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 104

CIS 117 VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING FOR MICROCOMPUTERS


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course will introduce the student to the fundamental concepts and structures in event driven programming using Visual Basic. Topics such as algorithm writing, program logic, program development and program execution will be covered with emphasis on GUI design and object-oriented programming (OOP). This course will improve a student’s critical thinking and logical sequencing skills.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 101

CIS 171 WINDOWS OPERATING SYSTEMS UTILITIES


2 Credits, 2 Contacts

After a short review of the overall concepts of Windows, the course will concentrate on the built-in utility and diagnostic programs that enable the user to perform scheduled computer maintenance. Students will study techniques to diagnose, troubleshoot and maintain computers for optimal performance.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 101

CIS 172 LINUX OPERATING SYSTEMS


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course provides the skills and knowledge necessary to install, configure, and administer Linux desktop operating systems. This course introduces students to the basic skills used by all Linux distributions. Specifically, the course covers the objectives outlined by CompTIA® for its Linux+ exam and certification.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 101 or permission from instructor

CIS 200 CONFIGURING WINDOWS DESKTOPS


3 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course covers installing and upgrading to Windows 8, configuring hard-ware and applications, configuring network connectivity, configuring access to resources, configuring remote access, monitoring and maintaining windows clients, configuring backup and recovery options. This course covers the MCSA 70-687 exam objectives.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 243

CIS 214 PRESENTATION GRAPHICS & PUBLISHING (POWERPOINT/PUBLISHER)


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course will introduce students to basic concepts of design as they apply to presentations and documents. Major areas of study include layout of text and graphics for various applications, color usage, and audience appropriateness of materials. During this course students will produce both presentations and document using MS PowerPoint/MS Publisher, and use computerized testing software to prepare to pass the nationally recognized Microsoft Office Specialist (PowerPoint) exam. The MOS is incorporated into the course.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 101

CIS 219 ADVANCED BASIC PROGRAMMING


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is a continuation of CIS 117 Visual BASIC and will concentrate on the following areas of programming: Sequential Access files, menus, Dialog boxes, error trapping, Random Access files, Variable arrays, Database Access, DDE and OLE.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 117

CIS 220 COMPUTER TECHNICIAN ESSENTIALS


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

The course will give students foundational knowledge of PC hardware, its maintenance, and repair. Students will learn to use, install, and configure current PC Operating systems and learn the fundamental principles of computer networks. In addition, this course will assist the student in preparing for the A+ Certification tests.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 101 or permission from the professor/instructor

CIS 224 COMPUTER REPAIR ESSENTIALS


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

The course is a continuation of CIS 220 Computer Technician Essentials. Students will learn core advanced skills for installing, configuring, supporting and troubleshooting computer hardware and software. Computer networks and security will be discussed as well as customer service skill. In addition, this course will assist the student in preparing for the A+ Certification tests.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 101 or permission from the professor/instructor

CIS 227 CONCEPTS OF SPREADSHEETS LEVEL I


2 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is designed to teach students the basic concepts of spreadsheets using MS EXCEL. Students will learn through demonstration, hands-on activities and computerized testing simulations, all the skills necessary to pass the Core level of a nationally recognized certification test in EXCEL. The certification test is incorporated into the course, so students passing the Core test will receive Core Certification in EXCEL.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 101

CIS 230 CONCEPTS OF SPREADSHEETS LEVEL II


2 Credits, 2 Contacts

This course is a continuation of CIS 227 designed to teach students advanced concepts of spreadsheet usage. Students will learn through demonstration, hands-on activities and computerized testing simulations, all the skills necessary to pass the Expert Level of a nationally recognized certification test in EXCEL. The certification test is incorporated into the course, so students passing the Expert test will receive Expert Certification in EXCEL.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 227

CIS 233 CONCEPTS OF WORD PROCESSING LEVEL I


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

Teaches students to create, edit and print documents using WORD, a word-processing program. Learn formatting techniques, using tables, creating multi-column documents, using graphics and more. This course covers the techniques needed to take the MOS certification, Core Level.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 101

CIS 234 DATABASE APPLICATIONS (ACCESS)


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course will investigate concepts relating to the design and use of the rational window based software ACCESS. Students will study data structure, data editing, screen formatting, search queries, report writing and file linking.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 101

CIS 236 CONCEPTS OF WORD PROCESSING LEVEL II (WORD)


2 Credits, 2 Contacts

This course is a continuation of EDP 233 designed to teach students the advanced concepts of word processing using MS WORD software. Students will learn through demonstration, hands-on activities and computerized testing simulations, all the skills necessary to pass the expert level of a nationally recognized, certification test in WORD. The certification test is incorporated into the course, so students passing the Expert test will receive Expert Certification in WORD.

 
Prerequisite: EDP 233

CIS 240 INTRODUCTION TO NETWORKING


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course introduces the student to Local Area Networks (LANs), Wide Area Networks (WANs) concepts and topologies, as well as networking hardware, software, and protocols along with the skills necessary to succeed in the dynamic field of networking. The emphasis in this course will be on the NET+ certification objectives.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 101

CIS 241 INSTALL AND CONFIGURE A WINDOWS NETWORK


3 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course will provide students with the fundamental skills to install and configure a Windows based server. Students will learn (through hands-on instruction) the various ways to deploy a windows server and configure server components including: storage, server roles, hyper-v, core services, and group policies. The course will also help prepare the student for the latest Microsoft certification exam.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 101

CIS 242 MANAGING & MAINTAINING A NETWORK SERVER (WINDOWS 2003/X)


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course introduces student to graphical tools and command-line utilities for installing, managing and maintaining a Windows 2003/X server. Students will learn the procedures to license, install, and configure Windows Server 2003/X. Other topics covered in this course are managing disks and server hardware, configuring and controlling resource access, managing terminal services and web services, using server management tools, monitoring performance and security, and creating and implementing a plan for server disaster recovery.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 171 and CIS 240

CIS 243 ADMINISTRATING A WINDOWS SERVER


3 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course will provide hands-on instruction to demonstrate the ability to implement, administer, and troubleshoot information systems using Microsoft Windows Server infrastructure in an enterprise environment. This course will primarily cover the administration tasks necessary to maintain a Windows Server 2012 infrastructure, such as configuring and troubleshooting name resolution, user and group management with Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS) and Group Policy, implementing Remote Access solutions such as DirectAccess, VPNs and Web Application Proxy, implementing Network Policies and Network Access Protection, Data Security, deployment and maintenance of server images, as well as update management and monitoring of Windows Server 2012 environments. The course will also help prepare the student for the latest Microsoft certification exam.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 241

CIS 244 ADVANCED MANAGEMENT OF A WINDOWS NETWORK


3 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course will provide advanced instructions that will provide knowledge and ability to administer, support, and troubleshoot information systems that incorporate Microsoft Windows servers and clients. This course will also provide skills necessary to pass current Microsoft certification exam.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 243

CIS 245 NETWORK SECURITY


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course will give students fundamental knowledge and skills in system and computer network security. Students will learn about security threats and risks, and how to defend against them. Other topics covered will include access control, assessments and audits, cryptography, and organizational security. The course will prepare the student to pass the CompTIA Security + Certification Exam.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 240

CIS 246 ADVANCED DATABASE APPLICATIONS (ACCESS)


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is a continuation of CIS 234 Database Applications (Access). The advanced course will cover topics similar to those in CIS 234, but at a higher level and in more depth. The course will cover such advance topics as Action Queries, SQL, Complex Forms and Reports, Complex Queries, Customizing User Interfaces, VBA Programming, ADO, DAO, ActiveX Controls, Error Handling, and Security. The course will be presented using several methodologies. For example: lecture, discussion, demonstration, group activities, handouts and exercises.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 234

CIS 247 IMPLEMENTING AN ADVANCED SERVER INFRASTRUCTURE


3 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course will provide hands-on instruction to demonstrate the ability to implement, administer, and troubleshoot information systems using Microsoft Windows Server infrastructure in an enterprise environment. This course will primarily cover the administration tasks necessary to maintain a Windows Server 2012 infrastructure, such as configuring and troubleshooting name resolution, user and group management with Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS) and Group Policy, implementing Remote Access solutions such as DirectAccess, VPNs and Web Application Proxy, implementing Network Policies and Network Access Protection, Data Security, deployment and maintenance of server images, as well as update management and monitoring of Windows Server 2012 environments. The course will also help prepare the student for the latest Microsoft certification exam.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 244

CIS 248 COMPUTER NETWORKING CAPSTONE


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course serves as the capstone course for all computer networking students and will integrate all of the networking skills acquired throughout the computer networking degree program. In this course, students will design, develop and implement a network design in either server infrastructure or router and switch infrastructure. Students will also prepare for an industry certification exam.

 
Pre-requisite: CIS 104 and CIS 241

Co-requisite: CIS 105 and CIS 244

CIS 252 WEB PAGE DESIGN LEVEL I


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is designed to teach students the basic concepts of Web Page creation using HTML programming language. Areas of concentration will be formatting of text, hypertext links, graphic and e-mail links, tables, color usage and basic JavaScript programming. By the end of the course students will have completed a working web page.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 100 and CIS 101

CIS 253 WEB PAGE DESIGN LEVEL II


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is a continuation of CIS 252. Students will learn to create more advanced web pages utilizing DHTML and MS Frontpage 2000. Areas of concentration will be, dynamic layout content, special effects, controlling mouse and keyboard events and creating windows and frames.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 252

CIS 254 WEB DESIGN AND PROGRAMMING LEVEL III


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is a continuation of CIS 253. Students will use both VBscript and JavaScript to create dynamic web applications using client side and server side pages. Areas of study will include script integration, object-oriented programming, data manipulation and storage, control structures, and various client/server applications.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 253

CIS 270 PC OPERATING SYSTEMS


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course will survey the current operating systems (OS) being used. The course will cover topics such as operating system theory, OS interfaces, installation and configuration, file structures, troubleshooting, and networking. The A+ certification exam objectives will be emphasized in the course.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 101 or permission of the professor/instructor

ART/CIS 280 WEB DESIGN WITH ADOBE DREAMWEAVER


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course will give the students a solid understanding of web design principles using Adobe Dreamweaver. Students will learn and configure the Dreamweaver environment, and use Dreamweaver to plan, create, and maintain website projects. Students will also learn how to format text, manage images, and use CSS for positioning objectives and controlling layout. Students will learn more advanced topics like rich media, spray elements, and database functionality. Throughout the course, students will be exposed to web design concepts including: Web Typography, color and graphic usage, page layout, navigation, usability, and designing webpages for various display media.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 100 and CIS 101

CIS 290 Capstone


2 Credits, 2 Contacts

This course serves as the capstone course for all computer support technician students and will integrate all of the support skills acquired throughout the computer support technician degree program. In this course, students will design, develop and implement a computer hardware and software support policy for a small business or organization. Students will also prepare of an industry certification exam.

 
Prerequisite: CIS 224 and CIS 241
Co-requisite: CIS 243 and CIS 245

 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

(CRJU formerly VTL)

CRJU/PHED 145 PHYSICAL FITNESS FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT


2 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is intended to prepare students for the physical rigors of the Police Academy and physical challenges of a career in criminal justice. It includes an introduction to and practice of the techniques of physical fitness necessary in law enforcement. Students will participate in stretching to increase flexibility, running to improve cardiovascular fitness, various calisthenics and weight training to increase upper and lower body strength as well as a variety of mental emotional health concepts in which to strengthen the mind body spirit connection. Overall health to include mental emotional health, diet, exercise and life span fitness are examined. The class is designed primarily to prepare students for the mandatory Michigan Commission on Law Enforcement (MCOLES) Fitness Agility Test in order to successfully be accepted into the police academy. However, all students are eligible for this course. This class will be offered winter semester.

 
Prerequisite: None

CRJU 218 SOCIAL JUSTICE


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

Exploration of job stresses and the social value and ethics of the criminal justice process.

 
Prerequisite: CRJU 110

CRJU 216 PROBATION & PAROLE


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

History and philosophy of probation, aftercare, and other community programs for juvenile and adult offenders; function and philosophy of parole, current laws, and case studies.

 
Prerequisite: CRJU 110

CRJU 214 PUBLIC SERVICE ADMINISTRATION


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is designed to assist the learner in enhancing their perspective of the role, functions and purpose of the police organization and management structure. The intent of the course is to integrate the learners’ experiences into the larger picture of the police organization and their role in that structure as a supervisor, manager or executive. The format for this class will include readings, online & library research, and other individualized learning experiences.

 
Prerequisite: CRJU 110

CRJU 212 COMMUNITY RELATIONS


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

Principles of community policing including youth-focused activities, community-based crime prevention, reorientation of patrol, police/public accountability, and decentralizing police decision making.

 
Prerequisite: CRJU 110

CRJU 211 PREVENTION OF CRIME & JUVENILE DELINQUENCY


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

Analysis of cause and control of crime as well as the problems of juvenile delinquency are studied – causation, control, juvenile courts, institutions, community resources, and federal and state programs.

 
Prerequisite: CRJU 110

CRJU 120 CRIMINOLOGY


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

The course is designed to study the nature and development of criminal behavior. Emphasis is placed on an examination of the leading theories concerning the causes of crime, nature of the criminal offender, and treatment of convicted offenders. A review of the public’s reaction toward crime is included.

 
Prerequisite: CRJU 110

CRJU 114 INTRODUCTION TO CORRECTIONS


3 CREDITS, 3 CONTACTS

Overview of the criminal justice system’s history, development, and evolution including subsystems of police, courts, and corrections.

 
Prerequisite: None

CRJU 113 CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION


3 CREDITS, 3 CONTACTS

Reconstruction of the sequences of a criminal act, including searching, preserving, and evaluating physical evidence including interviewing witnesses and interrogating suspects.

 
Prerequisite: None

CRJU 111 POLICE ADMINISTRATION


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

The course covers the basic functions of a police organization; management, communications, recruiting, training, public relations, and coordination.

 
Prerequisite: CRJU 110 or BUS 111 or ENG 121 concurrently

CRJU 110 INTRODUCTION TO LAW ENFORCEMENT


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

The problems of law enforcement in a democratic society are studied. The agencies involved in the administration of law enforcement – the legislature, the police, the prosecutor, the courts, and the correctional institutions are also studied.

 
Prerequisite: None

 

ECONOMICS

(ECON formerly BAE)

ECON 203 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS-MICRO


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

Introductory course in economics. This course builds upon the qualitative aspects of terminology, formulas and models to the quantitative application of these concepts. The four types of competition: perfect competition, monopolistic competition, oligopoly, and monopoly, will be covered in depth. Influential components of the U.S. market, such as labor, unions, wages and income distribution, will give the student a sound foundation toward understanding our complex economy.

 
Prerequisite: Placement beyond or satisfactory completion of ENG 063 and ENG 073 and test into MATH 117

ECON 204 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS-MACRO


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is a continuation of Micro-economic. A shift from single businesses to the inter-relationship between businesses, consumers and investors will be covered. The aggregate economy will also see the effects of government spending, taxation, inflation, interest rates, fiscal and monetary policy. This inter-relationship will be expanded to the global economy and the United States’ role in this economy through international trade and financing.

 
Prerequisite: ECON 203

 

EDUCATION

(EDU formerly SSE)

EDU 101 EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT I: AGES 0-3


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course will focus on typical and atypical developmental milestones of physical, cognitive, language, and social/emotional development of infants and toddlers (age 0 to 3) from diverse backgrounds and observation of children in early care environments. Theories of child development and contributions of theorists are reviewed in the context of application to developmental milestones. Emphasis is placed on care-giving skills, curriculum planning, appropriate environments, and strategies to enhance development.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 063 and ENG 073

EDU 102 EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT II: AGES 3 – 8


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course will focus on typical and atypical developmental milestones of physical, cognitive, language, and social/emotional development of preschool and early elementary children (age 3 to 8) from diverse backgrounds and observation of children in early education settings. Theories of child development and contributions of theorists are reviewed in the context of application to developmental milestones. The effects that multiple interrelated environmental factors have on the growth and development of the child will be explored.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 063 and ENG 073

EDU 120 INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This survey course introduces students to various theories and philosophies of child care, developmentally appropriate practice, and critical periods of development for children ages newborn to age 8, and CDA functional areas. Students will apply knowledge based on either an infant-toddler or preschool emphasis.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 063 and ENG 073

EDU 121 COLLEGE TUTORING


1 Credit, 1 Contact

This course trains students to become tutors. The role of the tutor is to help the tutee become an independent learner.

 
Prerequisite: None

EDU 122 TUTORING STUDENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES


1 Credit, 1 Contact

This course trains students to tutor students with learning disabilities. This course will emphasize study skills, test taking techniques, and other skills necessary to help the tutee to become an independent successful student.

 
Prerequisite: EDU 121 or approval of Director of Testing and Tutoring

 

ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY

(ELEC formerly VTE)

ELEC 110 BASIC ELECTRICITY


4 Credits, 6 Contacts

Students are enrolling in an open entry open exit program and have one calendar year to complete coursework from the date of registration. All modules must be completed with a 2.0 GPA minimum competency level. students completing ELEC 110 will study basic electrical circuits, applied electrical math, electrical safety and fundamentals of electricity necessary to be safe and competent when working with electricity.

 
Prerequisite: None

ELEC 111 INTRODUCTION TO AC/DC CIRCUITS


4 Credits, 6 Contacts

This is an open entry open exit program students may register at anytime. Modules must be completed with a minimum of 2.0 GPA for credits to be awarded. Students have one calendar year from registration date to complete the module. This class will provide the student with an introduction to AC and DC circuitry. Students will design, draw, build, test and troubleshoot these circuits.

 
Prerequisite: None

ELEC 116 RESIDENTIAL ELECTRICITY


4 Credits, 6 Contacts

Students are enrolling in an open entry open exit program and have two semesters to complete coursework from the date of registration. All modules must be completed with a 75% minimum competency level. Students completing ELEC 116 will study basic electrical residential circuits, installation procedures, and codes. The student will be safe and competent when working with electricity in a residential setting. Students will wire various switching circuits, GFCI’s, AFCI’s, panels, fuse boxes, luminaires, and low voltage wiring. Upon completion of this course, the student should have the knowledge and ability to wire a residence according to the National Electrical Code.

 
Prerequisite: None

ELEC 119 INTRODUCTION TO THE NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CODE


4 Credits, 6 Contacts

This is an open entry open exit class students may enroll at any time. Students have one calendar year from enrollment to complete the class. All modules must be completed with a minimum of 2.0 GPA unless otherwise stated for credit to be awarded. Students will work with the National Electrical Code a text that is updated every three years with several hundred changes. Student will learn to reference the NEC for answers to specific electrical questions and to back up why or how a special electrical job must be done using this information.

 
Prerequisite: None

ELEC 120 ELECTRICAL MOTOR CONTROLS I


4 Credits, 6 Contacts

This is an open entry open exit class students may enroll at any time. Students have one calendar year from enrollment to complete the class. All modules must be completed with a minimum of 2.0 GPA unless otherwise stated for credit to be awarded. Students will gain a basic understanding of motor controls. Students shall draw, design, build and troubleshoot motor control circuits.

 
Prerequisite: None

 

EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN

(EMT)

EMT 101 MEDICAL FIRST RESPONDER/EMERGENCY MEDICAL RESPONDER AND EMT


3.6 Credits, 4.5 Contacts

The MFR is the first level of responder to an emergency. The MFR course is a study of the topics and skills necessary to make life saving interventions and stabilize patients in a prehospital environment while waiting the arrival of more advanced care. Students who are successful in this course are eligible for licensing as a Medical First Responder through the Michigan Department of Community Health via the National Registry of EMT’s exam. Course also includes the opportunity to encounter the care of patients not only at the scene of an emergency, but during the transport and transfer of patients to higher levels of care. This clinical experience requires that MFR’s serve as an EMS team member during emergency care for 16 hours of patient care utilizing an Advanced Life Support agency.

 
Prerequisite: None

EMT 103 EMT BASIC PART II


7.4 Credits, 9.2 Contacts

Emergency Medical Technician is a fundamental course that is designed to provide you with the knowledge, skills and experience to function as a competent, entry-level practitioner. EMT’s are the first level of care in the transport of patients from the prehospital setting. The EMT course is a study of the topics and skills necessary to make life saving interventions and stabilize patients during transport to a medical facility. Successful students are eligible for licensing as an EMT Basic through the Michigan Department of Community Health via the National Registry of EMT’s certification exam.

 
Prerequisite: EMT 101

 

ENGLISH

(ENG formerly COM & HUL)

ENG 063 READING FOR COLLEGE


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course presents techniques for improving reading
analysis, comprehension and rate by means of reading
exercises and essays. Emphasizes vocabulary development,
understanding of main ideas and levels of meaning.

Prerequisite: Placement into ENG 063
 
 

*NOTE – ENG 063, ENG 071, ENG 072, ENG 073, and ENG 074 have the following characteristics:

  1. Grades – The following grades will be used:
  2. “CR” = Credit – Credit for course, does not affect grade point average.

    “IP” = In Progress – No credit, student may continue progress with the instructor the next available semester.

    “NC” = No Credit –Student will not receive credit because of non completion of the course requirements necessary for the “IP” grade.

  3. Graduation – Course credit toward graduation will depend on the degree or certificate.
  4. Transferability – These courses generally will not transfer to four-year colleges.

ENG 073 ESSENTIAL COLLEGE WRITING I


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is designed to help the student achieve competency in standard writing skills through the study of grammar, sentence structure and paragraph development.

 
Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 071 / ENG 072, or placement test
 
 

*NOTE – ENG 063, ENG 071, ENG 072, ENG 073, and ENG 074 have the following characteristics:

  1. Grades – The following grades will be used:
  2. “CR” = Credit – Credit for course, does not affect grade point average.

    “IP” = In Progress – No credit, student may continue progress with the instructor the next available semester.

    “NC” = No Credit –Student will not receive credit because of non completion of the course requirements necessary for the “IP” grade.

  3. Graduation – Course credit toward graduation will depend on the degree or certificate.
  4. Transferability – These courses generally will not transfer to four-year colleges.

ENG 074 ESSENTIAL COLLEGE WRITING II


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is designed to address student-specific problems with the writing process. The goal of the class is sufficient, consistent writing improvement to allow students to qualify for enrollment in ENG 121 or BUS 111.

 
Prerequisite: Enrollment is limited to students who have received an “IP” grade in ENG 073
 
 

*NOTE – ENG 063, ENG 071, ENG 072, ENG 073, and ENG 074 have the following characteristics:

  1. Grades – The following grades will be used:
  2. “CR” = Credit – Credit for course, does not affect grade point average.

    “IP” = In Progress – No credit, student may continue progress with the instructor the next available semester.

    “NC” = No Credit –Student will not receive credit because of non completion of the course requirements necessary for the “IP” grade.

  3. Graduation – Course credit toward graduation will depend on the degree or certificate.
  4. Transferability – These courses generally will not transfer to four-year colleges.

ENG 121 ENGLISH COMPOSITION I


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

A research based writing course in which students will work to develop their command of language as a means of shaping and ordering their experience and ideas, to develop their critical thinking skills, and to develop thought, organization, and clarity in their written work.

 
Prerequisite: Appropriate placement based on assessment (ACT, SAT or placement) or successful completion of ENG 073 or ENG 074. For special sections which include a lab requirement, a writing sample is required.

ENG 122 ENGLISH COMPOSITION II


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course extends the ENG 121English Composition I emphasis on expository writing and critical thinking to research writing. American Psychological Association (APA) format is introduced and applied to a primary research project.

 
Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 121 with a 2.0 or better

ENG 126 CREATIVE WRITING I


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course will be devoted to writing both poetry and short stories. Class will include both workshops of student works and analysis of published authors.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121

ENG 201 WOMEN & LITERATURE


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course will study feminine sensibility as revealed in literary themes and characterizations through a study of works written by women.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121

ENG 226 CREATIVE WRITING II


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

A survey course in which students work to develop their command of language as a means of shaping and ordering their experience and ideas through creative writing focused on poetry and prose; to develop critical, yet creative, thinking skills, and to develop thought, organization, and clarity in written work.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 126 with a 2.0 or better

ENG 233 CHILDREN’S LITERATURE


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is an introduction to narrative, biographical, and nonfictional reading materials for children from preschool age to age twelve. The course is structured so that students will have an adequate bibliography of materials for nursery school teaching, the elementary school classroom, or for lay introduction of reading to children. Guest speakers and useful projects focus on understanding the needed ingredients for stimulating a reading interest in children. In addition to an exploration of current reading materials, the course presents a brief, historical survey of children’s literature and discussion of possible adaptation to present classroom use.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121

ENG/HUM 234 WORLD MYTHOLOGIES


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is intended to acquaint students with the myths, legends and folklore of a variety of world cultures, both ancient and modern. Special attention will be focused on the historical and cultural context in which specific myths have developed. The course is designed to increase students’ critical thinking through the analysis of myths leading to a better understanding of some of the universal concerns of humankind that have been creatively expressed in myth throughout the world.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121

 

GENERAL EDUCATION

(GEN)

GEN 102 COLLEGE AND LIFE STRATEGIES FOR GENERAL EDUCATION MAJORS


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is designed for general education students at the college readiness level to explore the strategies and skills needed to make a successful transition into and through college, the workplace, and life. These strategies include identifying learning styles, self-awareness, managing motivation, setting goals, managing time, and applying study skills. Additional strategies include reading and studying textbooks, using critical thinking skills, taking notes, and preparing for and taking tests.

 
Prerequisite: None

 

GEOGRAPHY

(GEOG formerly NSG)

GEOG 142 PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY


4 Credits, 5 Contacts

An integrated study of the nature of man’s physical environment with emphasis on understanding the forces that create and shape our land forms. Lectures and laboratory experiences also include the study of earth materials, analysis of characteristic land forms, and interpretation of maps.
 
Prerequisite: Placement beyond or satisfactory completion of ENG 063 and ENG 073

 

GEOLOGY

(GEOL formerly NSG)

GEOL 145 PHYSICAL GEOLOGY


4 Credits, 5 Contacts

This course is a study of the rocks and minerals that make up the Earth along with the processes that form the Earth’s features and structure. Additionally, it will cover the glacial processes that have shaped much of Michigan. The course will include two field trips to sites of geologic interest in southern Michigan.

 
Prerequisite: Placement beyond or satisfactory completion of ENG 063 and ENG 073

 

GOVERNMENT

(PSI formerly SSG)

PSI 110 AMERICAN GOVERNMENT & POLITICAL SCIENCE


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course familiarizes students with various important aspects of American Government and the general study of political science. The prominent topics covered include identifying the ideological origins and functional components of the U.S. Constitution; investigating first amendment and civil rights and their extension to historically “non-mainstream” groups; reviewing significant political ideologies; analyzing public opinion polling, voting behavior and special interest group activities; defining public and foreign policy formation, and the role of political leadership. Critical thinking skills will be developed through applying course material to consideration of practical political situations.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 121

PSI 111 STATE & LOCAL GOVERNMENT


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

A study of structure and functions of states, municipalities, and other units of local government.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 121

 

HISTORY

(HIST formerly SSH)

HIST 101 WESTERN CIVILIZATION I: ANCIENT WORLD – 1715


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

Defines the basic political, economic and social trends influencing western cultural development including Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, Roman Republic and Empire, the Christian Era (c. 1000 – 1500), the Reformation, and the Wars of Religion. Instruction employs critical analysis of significant historical eras and societies effecting western civilization.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 121

HIST 102 WESTERN CIVILIZATION II


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

The course continues the development of Western Civilization from c. 1700 to the 20th Century. Major political, economic, and social developments reviewed include the Scientific, French, and American revolutions, the Industrial Revolution, the European Balance of Power (c. 1815-1870), the origins of World War I and II, and the Cold War era (c. 1945-1990). Instruction develops critical thinking skills relevant to understanding complex historical trends of the era.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121

HIST 201 U.S. HISTORY I: EUROPEAN COLONIZATION TO 1877


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

Instructional focus involves identifying significant political, economic and social trends in American development c. 1490’s through U.S. Reconstruction, 1877. Primary concentrations include review of European colonization, the British colonial rebellion, U.S. nation building, 1780’s – 1830’s and delineating the course of prominent events leading to the American Civil War and Reconstruction, 1865-1877. The course develops critical thinking skills through inquiry into broad overreaching themes of historical activity.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 121

HIST 202 U.S. HISTORY II: RECONSTRUCTION TO THE PRESENT


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

Course instruction investigates dominant political, economic, foreign policy, and social trends in U.S. development from Reconstruction through the 20th century. The main focus identifies the movement of America from rapid, post-Civil War industrialization, to emergence as a competitive world power; culminating in its becoming a preeminent global force after 1945. This inquiry involves refining critical thinking skills through analyzing overlapping and interconnected themes or modern U.S. development.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 121

HIST 204 HISTORY OF MICHIGAN


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course presents significant phases of the history of Michigan from a primitive wilderness to a complex, industrialized society. Political, economic, social and cultural aspects are discussed with emphasis on the relation to the history of the state to that of the nation. Special emphasis is given to the modern period.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 121

HIST 230 WOMEN IN THE WESTERN PAST


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course examines the condition of women in western civilization from prehistory to 1815 with particular attention to woman’s changing status and experiences in the family and work. Study of various institutions, associations, and activities in which women expressed themselves becomes the basis for conclusions about women’s contributions to history and culture. Special attention is given to the influence of women in society: their arts, sciences, and literature; and their political activities. This course allows students an opportunity to broaden their knowledge of the geography and culture of different countries while fulfilling the basic course learning objectives. This course is intended for students of all majors.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 121

 

HUMANITIES

(HUM formerly HUH)

HUM 101 MODERN CULTURE & THE ARTS


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

An introduction to art, music, photography, film, dance and architecture. Major emphasis is on the inter-relationship between art and culture. Designed to help students describe and analyze works of art and to understand that art does not “just happen,” but evolves in a cultural-historical context.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 121

ENG/HUM 234 WORLD MYTHOLOGIES


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is intended to acquaint students with the myths, legends and folklore of a variety of world cultures, both ancient and modern. Special attention will be focused on the historical and cultural context in which specific myths have developed. The course is designed to increase students’ critical thinking through the analysis of myths leading to a better understanding of some of the universal concerns of humankind that have been creatively expressed in myth throughout the world.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121

 

INDUSTRIAL STUDIES

(INDS formerly VTI)

INDS 151 MANUFACTURING PROCESSES


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course focuses on the processes that occur in a manufacturing system to change resources into products. These processes include the appropriate use of tools and machines, as well as human-made systems for planning, organizing, directing and controlling activities. Special emphasis will be placed on automation and its impact on a manufacturing system.

 
Prerequisite: None

 

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

(TRAV formerly SSF)

TRAV 200 TRAVEL AND STUDY ABROAD


2 Credits, 2 contacts

This class provides students with an opportunity for hands-on participation in cultural studies through national and international travel. In order to receive credit, students must take part in a tour led by full-time Glen Oaks faculty member(s). The course will include a three-hour orientation on the GOCC campus with additional meetings and group discussion at designated tour sites. Follow-up session will take place upon returning to the Glen Oaks campus.

 
Prerequisite: None

 

INTERNSHIP

INTERNSHIP

A course designed to give on-the-job experience that is commensurate with the student’s career objectives. It is intended to provide the student with a practical, experiential learning situation in a supervised professional work environment. Internships vary in length but are normally for one semester after 75% of coursework is completed. Required are 135 to 240 hours of on-the-job experience plus attendance in a scheduled seminar. Some programs of study require an internship placement and others recommend it as an elective. Students usually arrange for their own internships. Contact the Executive Assistant to the Dean of Academics and Extended Learning/Faculty for more information.

 
Prerequisite: 75% of coursework completed in the students major and a GPA of 2.5 or better. Students wishing to start an internship need to apply.

*This course does not typically transfer to 4-year institutions.

**Internships are normally taken near the end of your degree/certificate program.
 

General Requirements:

  1.  A minimum of 45 hours for every credit, or no less than 9 hours a week to obtain a total of 135 hours. The internship is to extend over a 15 week period.
  2.  It is the student’s responsibility to negotiate a mutually acceptable work schedule with the agency.
  3.  A student will also determine, with the supervisor at the work station, the duties and requirements of the Internship experience.
  4.  The student may receive financial remuneration for services rendered.
  5.  At least 75% of your major coursework is completed, as determined by the Executive Assistant to the Dean of Academics and Extended Learning/Faculty, with an overall 2.5 grade point average or above.

 

Procedure for Enrollment:

  1.  An internship must be planned in advance of registration and has the same drop/add deadline dates as any other course beginning on the first day of the semester. Internship credit may not be granted on a retroactive basis.
  2.  A student will need to meet with the Executive Assistant to the Dean of Academics and Extended Learning/Faculty to obtain approval and necessary forms.
  3.  The student must complete an internship application, submit a resume and obtain one (1) faculty recommendation from a current or previous instructor in the student’s major area.
  4.  Determine with the employer/supervisor a mutually acceptable work schedule, written objectives/duties of the job (signed by both student and employer/supervisor) and a start and finish date (some employers may require a student to commit to more than 135 hours). You must turn in verification of hours worked and a completed student evaluation of the internship experience.
  5.  After acceptance by the Executive Assistant to the Dean of Academics and Extended Learning/Faculty and the agency involved and after returning to the Dean of Academics and Extended Learning/Faculty the completed Internship Learning Contract, a student may then officially register and begin the course.

 

**There may be additional requirements mandated by the department.
 

Possible Courses:

Following is a list (not intended to be all-inclusive) of possible internship courses. Each is 3 credit hours and 3 contact hours.

  • BUS 271 Internship I Business
  • BUS 272 Internship II Business
  • TECH 271 Internship I Tech
  • TECH 272 Internship II Tech

 

LANGUAGES

(LNG formerly HUF)

LNG 110 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH FOR BUSINESS I


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is designed for business professionals who seek to develop basic conversational skills but are not interested in majoring in Spanish. Lessons include greetings and farewells, introductions, travel-related expressions, making long- distance phone calls, tips on food and eating out, making wholesale and retail purchases, making hotel reservations, cross- cultural communication, and general business terms. Not intended for major/minor; may not transfer as Spanish credit.

 
Prerequisite: None

LNG 111 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH FOR BUSINESS II


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is a continuation of Spanish for Business I. Topics explored include interviewing Spanish-speaking personnel, business correspondence in Spanish, accounting terms, tax terms, banking terms, and insurance terms. Cross-cultural communication is also examined.

 
Prerequisite: LNG 110

LNG 112 SPANISH FOR TEACHERS


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is an elementary introduction to the Spanish language and Hispanic culture with an emphasis on the particular needs of the classroom teacher and educational personnel. It seeks to provide students with basic communicative competence through an approach that focuses on the four essential skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Educational topics presented include: greeting children, giving classroom directions, correcting behavior, encouraging and praising children, communicating in parent-teacher conferences, filling out registration information, explaining educational programs and talking on the phone.

 
Prerequisite: None

LNG 125 SPANISH FOR HEALTH CARE WORKERS


2 Credits, 2 Contacts

This is a Spanish course for the healthcare workers. LNG 125 is a course with a lot of memorization of words and learning basic expressions that are used in the medical field. The course will make less emphasis on Spanish grammar and verb conjugations and more emphasis on medical terms such as triage, lab work, daily care of patient, maternity and body parts etc… as well as medical expressions and cultural information.

 
Prerequisite: None

LNG 161 SPANISH I


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This class offers an introduction to the Spanish language and culture. It is a course with an emphasis on reading, writing, speaking and listening in the target language. The student will memorize many phrases, verbs and vocabulary words. In addition the student will be introduced to some cultural and historical information about the Hispanic World. LNG 161 is equivalent to two years of high school Spanish or the first semester of 100-level Spanish at a four-year institution. Students with more than two years of Spanish must take LNG 162.

 
Prerequisite: None

LNG 162 SPANISH II


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This class is a continuation of LNG 161 Spanish I. It is a course with an emphasis on reading, writing, speaking and listening in the target language. The student will memorize many phrases, verbs and vocabulary words. In addition the student will continue to learn cultural and historical information about the Hispanic World. This course is the equivalent to the third and fourth year of high school or the second semester of 100-level Spanish at a four-year university.

 
Prerequisite: That you have completed LNG 161 and passed the course and/or instructor approval.

LNG 163 SPANISH III


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This class is a continuation of LNG 162 Spanish II. It is a course with an emphasis on reading, writing, speaking and listening in the target language. The student will memorize many phrases, verbs and vocabulary words. In addition the student will develop conversation skills while continuing to learn cultural and historical information about the Hispanic World. This course is the equivalent to the third semester of 100-200 level Spanish at a four-year university and/or you must have completed 4 years of high school Spanish.

 
Prerequisite: That you have completed LNG 161 and LNG 162 and you have passed the courses and/or instructor approval.

LNG 261 SPANISH IV


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is a continuation of the grammar review and cultural study offered in LNG 163 Spanish III and provides additional refinement of a student’s speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. LNG 261 Spanish IV is equivalent to a second semester 200-level Spanish course at a four-year institution.

 
Prerequisite: LNG 163 or permission of the instructor/professor

 

MACHINE TOOL

(MACH)

MACH 105 MACHINE TOOL BASICS


.17 Credits, 4 Contacts

The manufacturing worker must effectively and efficiently use the Machinery’s Handbook to reference technical information. This module will provide the student information necessary for the development of these skills and abilities as they apply to using the Machinery’s Handbook.

 
Prerequisite: None

MACH 110 MACHINE TOOL SAFETY


.17 Credits, 4 Contacts

The manufacturing worker understands that safety is the most important concern, primarily in regards to proper dress, housekeeping, safe machine operation, managing chips, and making machine adjustments. This module will provide the student with information necessary for the development of this knowledge as it applies to the machining industry.

 
Prerequisite: None

MACH 115 BLUEPRINT READING


1.16 Credits, 28 Contacts

The manufacturing worker must effectively and efficiently interpret engineering drawings. This module will provide the student with information necessary to develop these skills and abilities as they apply to reading blueprints and understanding GD&T symbols and feature control frames on blueprints.

 
Prerequisite: None

MACH 120 FUNDAMENTAL SKILLS


1.98 Credits, 48 Contacts

The manufacturing worker must effectively and efficiently perform fundamental machining technology skill operations. These modules will provide the student with information necessary for the development of these skills and abilities.

 
Prerequisite: None

MACH 125 PRECISION MEASUREMENT


2.75 Credits, 65 Contacts

The manufacturing worker must effectively and efficiently use measurement devices and apply precision measurement processes and practices. These modules will provide the student with information necessary for the development of these skills and abilities as they apply to using the various measurement devices.

 
Prerequisite: None

MACH 130 DRILL PRESS AND BAND SAW


2.51 Credits, 60 Contacts

Modules will provide the student with the information necessary for the development of these skills and abilities as they apply to determining proper speeds and feeds in operating the drill press and band saw.

 
Prerequisite: None

MACH 135 TURNING ON THE LATHE


4.61 Credits, 110 Contacts

Modules will provide the student with information necessary for the development of skills and abilities as they apply to the set-up, operation and maintenance of manual lathes to manufacture parts that meet specifications.

 
Prerequisite: None

MACH 140 ELECTRONIC DISCHARGE MACHINING


.79 Credits, 19 Contacts

Modules will provide the student with information necessary for the development of skills and abilities as they apply to the principles of electronic discharge machining.

 
Prerequisite: None

MACH 145 VERTICAL/HORIZONTAL MILLING


5.84 Credits, 140 Contacts

Modules will provide the student with information necessary for the development of these skills and abilities as they apply to the set-up and operation of manual milling machines to manufacture parts that meet specifications.

 
Prerequisite: None

MACH 150 SURFACE GRINDING


2.75 Credits, 66 Contacts

Modules will provide the student with information necessary for the development of the skills and abilities necessary when using a surface grinder and associated fixtures to manufacture parts that meet specifications.

 
Prerequisite: None

MACH 155 CYLINDRICAL GRINDING


1.50 Credits, 36 Contacts

Modules will provide the student with information necessary for the development of the skills and abilities to effectively and efficiently set-up and operate cylindrical grinding machines to manufacture parts that meet specifications.

 
Prerequisite: None

MACH 160 TOOL AND CUTTER GRINDER


3 Credits, 72 Contacts

Modules will provide the student with information necessary for the development of skills and abilities to effectively and efficiently set-up and operate cutter grinding machines to sharpen and/or manufacture cutting tools that meet specifications.

 
Prerequisite: None

MACH 165 CNC PROGRAMMING AND MACHINING


6.25 Credits, 150 Contacts

Modules will provide the student with information necessary for the development of skills and abilities necessary to effectively and efficiently program, set-up and operate computer numerically controlled (CNC) machine tools to manufacture components that meet customer and print specifications.

 
Prerequisite: None

MACH 170 MACHINE TOOL PROJECTS


5.58 Credits, 134 Contacts

Modules will provide the student with information and hands-on training necessary to effectively and efficiently set-up and operate machines to produce precision gauges, fixtures, tooling and other associated devises.

 
Prerequisite: None

MACH 175 MASTERCAM


4.5 Credits, 108 Contacts

Modules will provide information necessary to effectively and efficiently work with CAD/CAM software.

 
Prerequisite: None

MACH 180 PLASMA CUTTER


1.84 Credits, 44 Contacts

Modules will provide students with the understanding and skills necessary as they relate to plasma and oxy-fuel metal cutting processes including CNC plasma oxy fuel cutting, CNC plasma machine components, CNC plasma controls and advanced CNC plasma.

 
Prerequisite: None

 

MATHEMATICS

(MATH formerly NSM)

MATH 060 Basic Mathematics Skills


1 Credits, 1 Contacts

This course is designed to provide students with the skills necessary to be successful in Algebra. The self-paced course will lead students through three areas as needed; fractions, decimals and percentages.

 

Prerequisite: None

MATH 100 INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is designed to provide students with a strong foundation in basic algebra skills. Topics include operating with rational numbers, solving first degree equations and inequalities, graphing linear equations, write linear equations, operating with polynomials, solving quadratic equations by factoring, solving systems of linear equations, multiplying, dividing and simplifying rational algebraic expressions.

 
Prerequisite: MATH 055B or placement test

MATH 104 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is an extension of Introductory Algebra and prepares students for College Algebra or Calculus. Topics include operations with polynomials and rational algebraic expressions, graphs, rational exponents and radicals, complex numbers, equations and inequalities of the first and second degree, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of linear and second-degree equations and inequalities, and conic sections. This class may be taught in an open lab or traditional classroom environment.

 
Prerequisite: MATH 100 or placement test

MATH 105 MATHEMATICAL CONCEPTS FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is designed primarily for elementary teaching majors. The topics include fundamentals of problem solving, elementary concepts of sets, mathematical and numeration systems, elementary number theory, operations, properties and computation of real numbers, proportions, percent and measurement. Development of topics will focus on conceptual understanding.

 
Prerequisite: MATH 100 or placement test

MATH 109 MATH FOR TECHNICIANS I


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is designed to give students a review of basic mathematics: whole numbers, fractions, decimal numbers, percentages, measurement and pre-algebra. Practical problem-solving experiences covering a variety of topics in industrial technology will be used.

 
Prerequisite: None

MATH 117 FINITE MATHEMATICS


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

Provides the non-calculus mathematics background necessary for students in business, management and the life and social sciences. Emphasis throughout is to enhance student understanding of the modeling process and how mathematics is used in real world applications. A TI-83 graphing calculator is highly recommended for this course.

 
Prerequisite: MATH 104 Intermediate Algebra or placement test

MATH 119 MATH FOR TECHNICIANS II


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is a continuation of MATH 109 Math for Technicians I. Students will continue to complete problem-solving exercises related to a variety of industrial careers. Topics covered will include algebra, geometry and trigonometry.

 
Prerequisite: MATH 109

MATH 151 COLLEGE ALGEBRA


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

Intended to prepare students for further science and business courses. A study of functions and their graphs, including linear, exponential, logarithmic, periodic, and power functions. Emphasis on applications, problem solving and using graphic, numeric and symbolic methods to solve equations. Regression is used to construct linear, exponential, power, and quadratic functions from data. Additional topics include exponents, radicals, complex numbers, conic sections, and systems of equations.

 
Prerequisite: MATH 104 or placement test

MATH 161 CALCULUS I & ANALYTIC GEOMETRY


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is designed to provide an introduction to calculus for students majoring in mathematics, engineering, and physical sciences, or the social sciences. Topics include analytic geometry and differential and integral calculus.

 
Prerequisite: MATH 151 or placement test

MATH 162 CALCULUS II & ANALYTIC GEOMETRY


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is designed to follow MATH 161 Calculus I and Analytic Geometry, providing mathematics and science majors with further background in analytic geometry and in differential and integral calculus.

 
Prerequisite: MATH 161 or its equivalent

MATH 201 STATISTICS


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

An introductory course in statistics to include: probability, descriptive statistics, probability distributions and hypothesis testing. This course is for those entering our engineering technology programs, as well as any student who will need a course in basic statistics. TI-83 Graphing Calculator strongly recommended.

 
Prerequisite: MATH 104 Intermediate Algebra or placement test

MATH 990 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN MATH


2 Credits, 2 Contacts

This course will cover selected topics from a wide range of mathematical areas. The emphasis will be on exploring new mathematics and developing mathematical research ideas and methods. Topics will vary and students may repeat this course for credit.

 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor/professor

 

MUSIC

(MUS formerly HUM)

MUS 150 MUSIC APPRECIATION


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

A survey course to give the student a broad interpretation of our music heritage. Content will include Western Art Music, Jazz, Non-Western Music and the American Musical Theatre. The elements of music will be utilized to analyze each of these musical styles.

 
Prerequisite: Placement beyond or satisfactory completion of ENG 063 and ENG 073

MUS 154 WIND/PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE I


1 Credit, 1 Contact

This course is designed to provide exemplary musical experiences that enable wind/percussion ensemble players and audience members to be engaged, actively and reflectively, with the finest examples of wind/percussion ensemble performances.

 
Prerequisite: Successful audition with the Sturgis Wind Symphony

MUS 156 WIND/PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE II


1.5 Credits, 1.5 Contacts

This course is designed to provide exemplary musical experiences that enable wind /percussion ensemble players and audience members to be engaged, actively and reflectively, with the finest examples of wind/percussion ensemble performances.

 
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MUS 154 Wind/Percussion Ensemble I with the Sturgis Wind Symphony

 

NURSING

(NUR)

NUR 104 FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING


5 Credits, 8 Contacts

This course is designed to develop beginning knowledge of skills related to the holistic health needs of the client. It provides beginning nursing students with the foundation upon which other courses build and expand. Assessment via the nursing process, problem identification and communication skills necessary for therapeutic client care are emphasized. Caring and sensitivity to the client’s unique cultural, ethnic, and age-related needs are incorporated throughout.

A short period of directed learning activities in the College laboratory takes place before students care for selected clients in long-term health care facilities. Clients are assigned and their care supervised by professors/instructors from the College. Provision is made for post-conferences during which selected topics/procedures are presented and students share their learning experiences.

 
Prerequisite: Acceptance into Level I of the Nursing Program

NUR 109 PHARMACOLOGY I


2 Credits, 2 Contacts

This course is designed to provide a systematic method for calculations of medications, and to provide practice in solving drug, solution and dosage problems. A beginning survey of the sources of drugs, legal aspects regarding drug prescriptions, the effects of drug therapy, modes of administration and the use of references in the acquisition of information about drugs.

 
Prerequisite: Acceptance into Level I of the Nursing Program

NUR 111 MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING


6 Credits, 15 Contacts

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of providing nursing care for adult clients having common health care needs. Objectives are met through classroom theory and activities, a short period of directed learning activities in the Nursing Skills laboratory, and assignments in clinical agencies. The nursing process is emphasized in classroom theory and in the practical application of client care. A caring attitude and sensitivity to the client’s unique cultural, ethnic, and age-related needs are considered. Clinical experience in health care agencies is provided. Clients are assigned and their care supervised by instructors from the College. Provision is made for post-conferences which reinforce the learning process.

 
Prerequisite: Completion of first semester Level I courses: NUR 104, NUR 109, BIO 212

NUR 112 MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING II


7 Credits, 14 Contacts

This course is a continuation of Medical/Surgical Nursing, building upon previous knowledge, principles, and skills. Disease processes and their effects on the body are discussed as they relate to nursing care. There will be a special focus on trans-cultural nursing both in the classroom and clinical setting. Clinical experience in health care agencies is provided. Clients are assigned and their care supervised by instructors from the college.

 
Prerequisite: Completion of second semester Level I courses: NUR 111, NUR 119, NUR 131, ALH 103

NUR 119 PHARMACOLOGY II


2 Credits, 2 Contacts

This is a structured systemic approach to the study of drug therapy as it relates to the management of disorders included in NUR 111 Medical-Surgical Nursing I which is taught concurrently. Elements of the nursing process are included as they apply to drug administration.

 
Prerequisite: Completion of NUR 104 and NUR 109

NUR 129 PHARMACOLOGY III


2 Credits, 2 Contacts

This is a structured systemic approach to the study of drug therapy as it relates to the management of disorders included in NUR 111 Medical-Surgical Nursing I which is taught concurrently. Elements of the nursing process are included as they apply to drug administration.

 
Prerequisite: Completion of NUR 119

NUR 130 MATERNITY NURSING


3 Credits, 6 Contacts

Obstetrics NUR 130 is an introductory course that focuses on a holistic approach to the study of basic maternity and newborn care. The nursing process is used as the foundation for following a family along a continuum beginning with pregnancy and progressing through childbirth, postpartum care and care of the newborn. The student is introduced to the complications of childbearing and other reproductive issues. Clinical experience under the supervision of a professor/instructor is provided.

 
Prerequisite: Completion of second semester Level I courses

NUR 131 PEDIATRIC NURSING


3 Credits, 6 Contacts

Pediatric NUR 131 is an introductory course that focuses on Holistic health needs from infancy through adolescence. The focus is on common conditions and illnesses of children. The clinical focuses on the nursing care of the ill child. Developmental concepts, health promotion and prevention are emphasized in clinical and theory. Clinical experience is provided under the supervision of a Professor/Instructor.

 
Prerequisite: Completion of first semester Level I courses

NUR 201 HEALTH CARE ETHICS


2 Credits, 2 Contacts

This course provides the student with various ethical principles that may form the foundation for rationales relative to nursing decisions and actions. The student will be encouraged to examine current biomedical and conflict issues in a logical manner applying philosophical reasoning.

 
Prerequisite: Completion of first level courses and first and second semesters of Level II.

Co-Requisite: Third semester Level II courses

NUR 213 COMPLEX PARENT-CHILD NURSING


4 Credits, 10 Contacts

This course builds upon the beginning concepts of NUR 130 Maternity Nursing and NUR 131 Pediatric Nursing. The content will focus on an in-depth assessment of the family’s health needs. The course will assist the student to identify complex emotional needs of the family and its individual members, complications of the maternity cycle, seriousness of health problems affecting children or combinations of these processes. Clinical experiences will attempt to utilize high-risk clients as a means of facilitating student understanding of complex nursing needs and appropriate nursing intervention. Comprehensive nursing care of the client in maternal-child nursing requires a thorough understanding of human development, pathological and congenital conditions, psycho-social influences, and principles of nursing diagnosis and care, with application of knowledge gained in basic science and nursing courses.

 
Prerequisite: Completion of first semester Level II courses

NUR 214 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH NURSING


3 Credits, 9 Contacts

The focus of this course is to provide students with knowledge and skills related to the individual with emotional and/or mental health needs. The course will attempt to help the student identify aberrations in personality and behavior as well as techniques or methods available in the community to restore mental health. The clinical experience will utilize available community resources and support the student to develop therapeutic communication and interaction techniques.

 
Prerequisite: All nursing and non-nursing courses required at Level I of the Nursing Program

NUR 215 COMPLEX MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING


4 Credits, 10 Contacts

This course is designed to provide a more advanced integration of the pathophysiology of common conditions that affect adults. The student will be provided opportunities to utilize the nursing process in depth in relation to the care of adults with high risk health problems or combination of multiple health problems which indicate complexity.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of first semester Level II courses within the Nursing Program.

Co-Requisite: NUR 213 Complex Parent-Child Nursing and BIO 230 Microbiology

NUR 216 LEADERSHIP IN NURSING


2 Credits, 8 Contacts

This course is designed to assist the student to develop beginning skills in assuming leadership for the direction of the care of small groups of clients. The student will be provided experience in setting priorities in nursing care, delegating appropriate tasks to others, evaluating the accomplishment of goals, and developing problem solving skills in an effort to develop independent accountability. Clinical experience under the supervision of a professor/instructor is provided.

 
Prerequisite: Completion of Level I courses and first and second semester of Level II

Co-Requisite: Third semester Level II courses

NUR 220 NURSING ROLE TRANSITION


2 Credits, 5 Contacts

This course supports the student through role transition to the registered nurse level of practice. Opportunities to learn and practice advanced nursing skills will be provided.

 
Prerequisite: Acceptance into Level II of the Nursing Program

 

PHILOSOPHY

(PHIL formerly HUP)

PHIL 210 ETHICS


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

A study of ethical terminology, standards of ethical and moral decisions and types of ethical and ethical value systems. Issues such as right and wrong responsibility, accountability and whistle-blowing are addressed. A case study approach is utilized to emphasizing practical decision making in terms of personal, professional and social morality.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121

PHIL 230 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

An introduction to the study of philosophy emphasizing the examination of issues that have been the focus of thinkers of various cultures and civilizations. This course will challenge students to foster a greater understanding, tolerance and appreciation for diversity of alternative views and approaches to philosophical thought.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION/ACTIVITY

(PHED formerly NSH)

PHED 100 FITNESS/WELLNESS LAB


1 Credits, 2 Contacts

This course is designed for individuals interested in improving total fitness throughout our super circuit program. This is for students who have little or no workout experience. A qualified instructor will develop a specific program for the student with special health concerns. Will include an individual fitness assessment. Following the scheduled orientation session, students will be allowed meet course requirements through an open schedule.

 
Prerequisite: None

PHED 104 FITNESS/WELLNESS LAB


1 Credits, 2 Contacts

Designed for individuals with previous experience and knowledge of an exercise program. This course will include an individual fitness evaluation, analysis of results, and a program using various weight training and aerobic equipment. Following the scheduled orientation session, students will meet course requirements through an open schedule.

 
Prerequisite: PHED 100 or PHED 106 or workout experience

PHED 105 FITNESS/WELLNESS LAB


1 Credits, 2 Contacts

An extension of PHED 104 Fitness/Wellness Lab, but with a greater involvement to maintain/improve physical fitness. Will include an individual fitness evaluation and analysis of results. Following the scheduled orientation session, students will meet course requirements through an open schedule.

 
Prerequisite: PHED 104

PHED 106 WELLNESS & LIFESTYLE


2 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course presents inventories of levels of cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and muscular endurance and methods for improving each factor through exercise, nutrition and stress management intervention strategies. Through lecture and activity in lab a wide variety of methods for improving personal health and well being is presented, discussed, and practiced.

 
Prerequisite: Placement beyond or satisfactory completion of ENG 063 and ENG 073

PHED 107 FITNESS/WELLNESS LAB


1 Credits, 2 Contacts

Similar to PHED 105 Fitness/Wellness Lab, but individuals will write and engage in their own personalized fitness program. Will include an individual evaluation and analysis of results. Students will meet course requirements through an open schedule.

 
Prerequisite: PHED 105

PHED 110 WELLNESS, LIFESTYLE AND FITNESS FOR MIDDLE AGED WOMEN/MEN


2 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is designed to learn about the unique fitness and wellness challenges of middle-aged women and men. Workouts will be catered to the age and fitness level of each student. The middle age demographic will defined as ages 35-55, but all ages of students are allow taking the course. The course present inventories of levels of cardiovascular fitness, flexibility and muscular endurance and methods for improving each factor through exercise, nutrition, and stress management intervention strategies. Through lecture and activity in lab a wide variety of methods for improving personal health and well-being is presented, discussed and practices. Fitness for a lifetime will also be presented, discussed and practiced.

 
Prerequisite: None

PHED 119 AEROBIC I


1 Credit, 1 Contact

Instruction will cover the fundamentals of aerobics. This class is designed to assist the student in implementing the fundamentals of aerobic activity in to their lifestyle.

 
Prerequisite: None

PHED 120 AEROBIC II


1 Credit, 1 Contact

Instruction will cover the fundamentals of aerobics. This class is designed to assist the student in implementing the fundamentals of aerobic activity into their lifestyles.

 
Prerequisite: None

PHED 130 BEGINNING YOGA


2 Credits, 2 Contacts

This course provides an introduction to basics of Yoga. It focuses on breathing and relaxation techniques; improving coordination, balance, posture, and alignment; and enhancing strength and flexibility. In this class, students will progress at their own pace and will be urged to listen to their own bodies and let go of competition, judgment and expectations. All poses will be introduced with modifications so that students may progress at their own levels.

 
Prerequisite: None

CRJU/PHED 145 PHYSICAL FITNESS FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT


2 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is intended to prepare students for the physical rigors of the Police Academy and physical challenges of a career in criminal justice. It includes an introduction to and practice of the techniques of physical fitness necessary in law enforcement. Students will participate in stretching to increase flexibility, running to improve cardiovascular fitness, various calisthenics and weight training to increase upper and lower body strength as well as a variety of mental emotional health concepts in which to strengthen the mind body spirit connection. Overall health to include mental emotional health, diet, exercise and life span fitness are examined. The class is designed primarily to prepare students for the mandatory Michigan Commission on Law Enforcement (MCOLES) Fitness Agility Test in order to successfully be accepted into the police academy. However, all students are eligible for this course. This class will be offered winter semester.

 
Prerequisite: None

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION/LECTURE

(PHED formerly NSH)

PHED 212 COACHING PRINCIPLES


2 Credits, 2 Contacts

Designed to cover the fundamental techniques of coaching major sports. The coaching principles of conditioning, drills, team organization and game strategy will be stressed.

 
Prerequisite: Placement beyond or satisfactory completion of ENG 063 and ENG 073

 

PHYSICS

(PHYS formerly NSP, NSS)

PHYS 144 ASTRONOMY


4 Credits, 5 Contacts

Introductory laboratory based astronomy course for those who desire an exploratory experience covering a wide range of astronomical topics. The course coverage will include: our solar system, stars, constellations, galaxies and theories of the universe. The theory and use of astronomical telescopes will be a prominent part of the course.

 
Prerequisite: Placement beyond or satisfactory completion of ENG 063 and ENG 073

PHYS 251 PHYSICS I


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

First course in calculus-based physics dealing with mechanics, fluids, wave motion and sound. Especially suited for physic and engineering majors and is recommended for majors in other sciences.

 
Prerequisite: MATH 161

Concurrently: PHYS 252

PHYS 252 PHYSICS I LAB


1 Credit, 3 Contacts

A laboratory course which includes exercises related to topics covered in PHYS 251 Physics I.

 
Prerequisite: MATH 161
Concurrently: PHYS 251

PHYS 253 PHYSICS II


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

A continuation of PHYS 251 Physics I. Included are topics in heat, electricity, magnetism, light and elements of modern physics.

 
Prerequisite: PHYS 251 and PHYS 252


Concurrently: PHYS 254

PHYS 254 PHYSICS II LAB


1 Credits, 3 Contacts

Laboratory course which includes exercises related to topics discussed in PHYS 253 Physics II.

 
Prerequisite: PHYS 251 and PHYS 252

Concurrently: PHYS 253

PHYS 275 PHYSICAL SCIENCE RESEARCH PROJECT


2 Credits, 2 Contacts

The Physical Science Research Project is a capstone experience in the Physical Sciences for the student seeking an Associate of Science Degree. In this course the student will pose a question or problem in physical sciences, design and conduct an experiment or investigation, and report the results of their experiment or investigation to an appropriate student-level publication or present their results at a student-level science conference. The course will allow the student to bring together their college course experiences in science, mathematics and communications while pursing advanced work in an area of their own interest. A departmental exam covering skills learned in the science core will be administered at the end of this course.

 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor/professor

 

PRACTICUM

ALH 238 MEDICAL ASSISTANT PRACTICUM


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

The Medical Assistant practicum focuses first on the business/administration aspect within the clinical setting. It is intended to provide the student with experience in the work environment in the front office area. The second half of the practicum focuses on clinical aspects in the patient care area of the medical clinic. The practicum is 12-15 weeks and requires 200 hours, plus attendance at a twice monthly, 2 hour scheduled seminar, for a total of 12 hours. This is an unpaid educational work experience to be taken concurrently with ALH 290 and after all other coursework in the program has been successfully completed. After successful completion of this course, the student may apply to the American Association of Medical Assisting (AAMA) to write the certifying exam for Medical Assisting (CMA, AAMA).

Prerequisite: Student must have completed all the curriculum courses in the Medical Assistant Certificate program with a minimum of 2.0 GPA in each theory class; a minimum of 2.5 in the administrative/clinical courses, ALH 122, 123, 232, 233; and an overall GPA of 2.5. This course must be taken the semester following the completion of ALH 123 or the student may be required to retake ALH 122 & 123.
 
 

General Requirements:

  1. The externship is to extend over a 15 week period.
  2. It is the student’s responsibility to negotiate a mutually acceptable work schedule with the agency.
  3. The student and externship supervisor will determine, with the supervisor at the work stations, the duties and requirements of the externship experience.
  4. At least 75% of your major coursework is completed, as determined by the externship supervisor, with an overall 2.5 GPA or above. Except in the Allied Health programs where 100% of coursework must be completed.

 

Procedure for Enrollment:

  1. An externship must be planned a semester in advance of registration and has the same drop/add deadline date as any other course beginning on the first day of the semester. Externship credit may not be granted on a retroactive basis.
  2. A student will need to meet with the externship supervisor to obtain approval and necessary forms.
  3. The student must complete an externship application, submit a resume and obtain 3 faculty recommendations from current or former instructors in your major area.
  4. Determine with the employer/supervisor a mutually acceptable work schedule, written objectives/duties of the job (signed by both student and employer/supervisor) and a start and finish date. You must turn in verification of hours worked and a completed student evaluation of the extern experience to the externship supervisor.
  5. After acceptance by the externship supervisor and the agency involved, and after returning to the externship supervisor the completed externship Learning Contract, a student may then officially register and begin the course.

ALH 280 CODING SPECIALIST – PHYSICIAN-BASED (CCS-P) PRACTICUM


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

The Coding Specialist – Physician-based (CCS-P) serves a key role in the medical office, clinic or hospital setting. CCS-Ps are coding practitioners who specialize in physician-based settings such as physician offices, group practices, multi-specialty clinics, or specialty centers. They review patient records and possess in-depth knowledge of the CPT coding system and familiarity with the ICD-9-CM and HCPCS Level II coding systems. They are experts in health information documentation, data integrity, and quality and play a critical role in a health provider’s business operations for data submitted to insurance companies or the government for expense reimbursement. The new concepts in the ICD-10-CM system will be included.

 
Prerequisite: Student must have completed all of the curriculum in the Coding Specialist – Physician-based (CCS-P) program with a minimum of 2.0 in each theory class
 
 

General Requirements:

  1. The externship is to extend over a 15 week period.
  2. It is the student’s responsibility to negotiate a mutually acceptable work schedule with the agency.
  3. The student and externship supervisor will determine, with the supervisor at the work stations, the duties and requirements of the externship experience.
  4. At least 75% of your major coursework is completed, as determined by the externship supervisor, with an overall 2.5 GPA or above. Except in the Allied Health programs where 100% of coursework must be completed.

 

Procedure for Enrollment:

  1. An externship must be planned a semester in advance of registration and has the same drop/add deadline date as any other course beginning on the first day of the semester. Externship credit may not be granted on a retroactive basis.
  2. A student will need to meet with the externship supervisor to obtain approval and necessary forms.
  3. The student must complete an externship application, submit a resume and obtain 3 faculty recommendations from current or former instructors in your major area.
  4. Determine with the employer/supervisor a mutually acceptable work schedule, written objectives/duties of the job (signed by both student and employer/supervisor) and a start and finish date. You must turn in verification of hours worked and a completed student evaluation of the extern experience to the externship supervisor.
  5. After acceptance by the externship supervisor and the agency involved, and after returning to the externship supervisor the completed externship Learning Contract, a student may then officially register and begin the course.

ALH 281 MEDICAL ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST PRACTICUM


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

The Medical Administrative Specialist serves a key role in the medical office, clinic or hospital setting. This multi-skilled practitioner is competent in medical records management, insurance processing, coding and billing, management of practice finances, information processing, and fundamental office tasks. The practitioner maintains familiarity with clinical and technical concepts of coordinate administrative office functions in the health care setting. This program is approved by American Medical Technologists (AMT is accredited by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies NCCA) as a program of study for those who wish to sit for the Certified Medical Administrative Specialist – CMAS (AMT).

 
Prerequisite: Student must have completed all of the curriculum in the Medical Administrative Specialist Certificate program with a minimum of 2.0 in each theory class and an overall GPA of 2.5
 
 

General Requirements:

  1. The externship is to extend over a 15 week period.
  2. It is the student’s responsibility to negotiate a mutually acceptable work schedule with the agency.
  3. The student and externship supervisor will determine, with the supervisor at the work stations, the duties and requirements of the externship experience.
  4. At least 75% of your major coursework is completed, as determined by the externship supervisor, with an overall 2.5 GPA or above. Except in the Allied Health programs where 100% of coursework must be completed.

 

Procedure for Enrollment:

  1. An externship must be planned a semester in advance of registration and has the same drop/add deadline date as any other course beginning on the first day of the semester. Externship credit may not be granted on a retroactive basis.
  2. A student will need to meet with the externship supervisor to obtain approval and necessary forms.
  3. The student must complete an externship application, submit a resume and obtain 3 faculty recommendations from current or former instructors in your major area.
  4. Determine with the employer/supervisor a mutually acceptable work schedule, written objectives/duties of the job (signed by both student and employer/supervisor) and a start and finish date. You must turn in verification of hours worked and a completed student evaluation of the extern experience to the externship supervisor.
  5. After acceptance by the externship supervisor and the agency involved, and after returning to the externship supervisor the completed externship Learning Contract, a student may then officially register and begin the course.

ALH 285 PHLEBOTOMY TECHNICIAN PRACTICUM


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

The Phlebotomy Technician Practicum focuses first on laboratory skills within the clinical setting. It is intended to provide the student with experience in the work environment in the laboratory of a CLIA Waived medical office or a hospital based laboratory. The practicum requires 100 clinical hours, at a class seminar, for a total of 12 hours. This is an unpaid educational work experience to be taken after all other coursework in the program has been successfully completed. After completion of the practicum the student may apply to the American Society of Clinical Pathology (ASCP) to write the Phlebotomy Technician (PBT) exam.

Prerequisite: Student must have completed all of the curriculum in the Phlebotomy Certificate program with a minimum of 2.0 GPA in each theory class; a minimum of 2.5 in the clinical course, ALH 230, and an overall GPA of 2.5. This course must be taken the semester following the completion of all program coursework at the latest or the student may be required to retake ALH 230.
 
 

General Requirements:

  1. The externship is to extend over a 15 week period.
  2. It is the student’s responsibility to negotiate a mutually acceptable work schedule with the agency.
  3. The student and externship supervisor will determine, with the supervisor at the work stations, the duties and requirements of the externship experience.
  4. At least 75% of your major coursework is completed, as determined by the externship supervisor, with an overall 2.5 GPA or above. Except in the Allied Health programs where 100% of coursework must be completed.

 

Procedure for Enrollment:

  1. An externship must be planned a semester in advance of registration and has the same drop/add deadline date as any other course beginning on the first day of the semester. Externship credit may not be granted on a retroactive basis.
  2. A student will need to meet with the externship supervisor to obtain approval and necessary forms.
  3. The student must complete an externship application, submit a resume and obtain 3 faculty recommendations from current or former instructors in your major area.
  4. Determine with the employer/supervisor a mutually acceptable work schedule, written objectives/duties of the job (signed by both student and employer/supervisor) and a start and finish date. You must turn in verification of hours worked and a completed student evaluation of the extern experience to the externship supervisor.
  5. After acceptance by the externship supervisor and the agency involved, and after returning to the externship supervisor the completed externship Learning Contract, a student may then officially register and begin the cours

BUS 281 ACCOUNTING PRACTICUM


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This class will prepare students for the Certified Bookkeeper (CB) Designation exam, which is nationally recognized test that assures the level of knowledge and skills needed to carry out all the key functions through adjusted trial balance, including basic payroll, for firms. This exam is administered through the American Institute of Professional Bookkeepers (AIPB). This class is a stand-alone class covering the following accounting functions: accruals, deferred expenses, adjustments, corrections, bank reconciliation, payroll, depreciation, inventory, internal controls, and fraud. This class will serve as a capstone class for the Accounting Certificate.

 
Pre-requisite: ACCT 100, ACCT 109, ACCT 111, ACCT 112, ACCT 113, ACCT 204, ACCT 213

BUS 282 MARKETING PRACTICUM


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This class is a capstone class in Marketing. It will prepare students in several areas of Marketing to include the following: Marketing Research, Social Media, Networking, Sales, and Career Development. The practical application of this material in Marketing will allow students to go beyond this class to achieve American Marketing Association (AMA) Collegiate Certification Programs for students. This certification is not included in this class but will be available in conjunction with this class. These certifications must be completed beyond the class requirements, and will be issued from the AMA.

 
Pre-requisite: ACCT 100, ACCT 111, BUS 153, BUS 205

BUS 283 MANAGEMENT PRACTICUM


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This class will prepare students for the Foundations of Management (FoM) exam, which is a nationally recognized test designed for employees interested in transitioning to management or supervisory roles. This exam is administered though the Institute of Certified Professional Managers (ICPM). This class is a stand-alone course designed to help students integrate their understanding of the following components: Business Environment, Business Communications, Human Resources, Management, Supervision, and Accounting. This course is a capstone class for the Management/Supervision Certificate.

 
Pre-requisite: ACCT 100, ACCT 111, BUS 252, BUS 253

 

PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT

Developing Your Portfolio for College Credit

Developing Your Portfolio for College Credit is a free, self-paced course that guides students through the process of creating a course-match prior learning assessment portfolio for evaluation by LearningCounts. After completing the course, students can submit a portfolio for assessment by CAEL-trained faculty assessors with the appropriate subject matter expertise.

 

PSYCHOLOGY

(PSY formerly SSP)

PSY 101 PSYCHOLOGY


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

A scientific study of behavior is examined which leads to a greater understanding of human behavior, insight into mental processes and a better comprehension of the inconsistencies between human feelings and actions. Topics include learning, memory, the nervous system, perception, motivation, social interaction, attitudes, intelligence and abnormal behavior.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 121

PSY 201 PSYCHOLOGY & PERSONALITY


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course is designed to give us a better understanding of ourselves and others and help us to develop our resources for effective living in today’s world. Topics include an inquiry into man’s basic nature and potentialities, his intellectual, emotional and social development, how he perceives himself in relation to his environment and is motivated to act, the kinds of problems he faces and how he goes about trying to solve them and the nature of individual and group relationships.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 121

PSY 210 HUMAN GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is a life span study of the influences and processes in the physical, social, emotional and mental growth and development of individuals.

 
Prerequisite: PSY 101, ENG 121 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 121

PSY 220 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course places primary emphasis on clinically significant behavioral and psychological patterns associated with distress and impairment. Symptoms, suspected causes and treatment will be examined.

 
Prerequisite: PSY 101, ENG 121 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 121

PSY 250 HUMAN SEXUALITY


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course is an introduction to the biological, psychological and social aspects of human sexuality. Topics to be covered include sexual values, sexual development, male and female anatomy and physiology, the sexual responses cycle, sexual health and diseases, pregnancy, contraception, abortion issues, sexual gender orientation issues, intimate relationships, sexual dysfunction, and sexual abuse.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 121

PSY 260 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

Studies psychological principles and research pertaining to individual social behavior and the social influences on behavior and mental processes; covers attitude formation and change, conformity, social exchange, prejudice, conflict, influence, structure and function of groups, persuasion, motivation, prejudice, aggression, and interpersonal attraction; examines culture’s impact on social behavior and human interactions.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 121

PSY 280 PSYCHOLOGY OF SOCIAL COMMUNICATION


3 Credits, 3 Contacts

This course will explore the history, growth and behavioral issues within social media. Through this class, students will learn the psychology behind social media communications, its application toward personal and professional development as well as how to create and maintain a social media presence. Social media venues such as Facebook, Google+, Snapchat, LinkedIn, YouTube, Pinterest, Instagram along with others will be integrated throughout this course.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 073 or equivalent COMPASS score

 

RELIGION

(REL formerly HUR)

REL 231 COMPARATIVE RELIGION


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

A study of the major world religions–Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam–their history, beliefs, festivals and practices as well as their place in the contemporary world. The nature of religion and its place in the human experience will also be considered.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121

REL 232 OLD TESTAMENT


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

An introductory study of the Old Testament, focusing attention on the authorship, date and contents of the Old Testament. Attention will be given to recent historical and archaeological discoveries as they relate to Biblical writings.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121

REL 233 NEW TESTAMENT


4 Credits, 4 Contacts

A survey of the New Testament. Consideration will be given to the data and authorship; the historical, political and cultural background of the New Testament; and the bearing of archaeological discoveries on New Testament studies. The Apostolic Fathers and other post-New Testament literature will be reviewed.

 
Prerequisite: ENG 121

 

SOCIAL WORK

(SWK)

1/2 hour delay Friday Oct 20, SLS 100

Fri, Oct 20, R Burch, SLS 100 College Life\Strat. will start at 9:30am instead of 9am.  This delay is this week only

Winter 2018 Part-Time Faculty

Posting Date: October 19, 2017

Position: Part-Time Faculty (Multiple Subjects)

Job Info: PT Faculty Winter18

Closing Date: Until Filled

Michigan Milk Producers Association

Posting Date: October 17, 2017

Position(s): Office Clerk

Organization/Location: Constantine, MI

Job Type: Full Time

Job Information: Office Clerk Michigan Milk Producers Association Oct 2017</a

Closing Date: November 17, 2017

Michigan Milk Producers Association

Posting Date: October 17, 2017

Position(s): Maintenance Mechanic

Organization/Location: Constantine, MI

Job Type: Full Time

Job Information: Maintenance Mechanic Michigan Milk Producers Association Oct 2017

Closing Date: November 17, 2017

ART 220 HISTORY OF ART I – CANCELED

MONDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2017

1:00 – 2:50 P.M.

M. NORTHROP

Best Western Plus

Posting Date: October 12, 2017

Position(s):Front Desk/Night Auditor Housekeeping

Organization/Location: Howe IN

Job Type: Full Time

Job Information: Best Western Plus Howe Inn Job AD  October 2017Posting

Closing Date: November 12, 2017

CHEM 130 CHEMISTRY LAB – CANCELED

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2017

11:00 A.M. – 12:50 P.M.

S. SIMMONS

Part-Time Certified Nurse Aide Instructor

Posting Date: October 9, 2017

Job Information: PT CNA Instructor

Position Type: Part-Time

Closing Date: Open Until Filled

It’s College Night in St. Joseph County – Wednesday Oct. 11, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Glen Oaks Community College – Ken Schuler Court Over 50 colleges and military organizations expected to participate

Area high school students, parents and members of the community are invited to visit Glen Oaks Community College on Tuesday, Oct. 11th for the 27th annual St. Joseph County College Night. Representatives from over 50 colleges and military organizations will to be on hand to meet prospective students and share information on their institutions. The event will be held in the Ken Schuler Court from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

“This is an opportunity for students and parents to meet and speak directly with college representatives throughout the evening, without having to visit various campuses, make telephone calls, or search the web for information,” said Adrienne Skinner, Glen Oaks Director of Admissions.

College representatives will answer questions about the admission process, entrance requirements and programming. Students will have the benefit of exploring higher education options available to them, all in one convenient location.

In addition to the College Fair,

  • Centro Vida will offer a free presentation in Spanish to Hispanic students and parents from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. in the Dresser Business Development Auditorium.
  • A free Financial Aid Information Session will take place from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. in the Nora Hagen Theatre, Room D235 at Glen Oaks.
  • From 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., there will be tours every 15 minutes of the new Devier Student Suites housing complex on a first-come, first-served basis.

A new option this year will help students save time at the college table by pre-registering their information. Students may register in advance for free at: gotocollegefairs.com and receive an electronic barcode. They should print out the barcode and bring it along to College Night.

For questions or more information on the annual St. Joseph County College Night, one should call Admissions at 269-294-4253 or visit Glenoaks.edu.

Crossroads Missionary Church

Posting Date: October 6, 2017

Position(s): Part time Worship Leader

Organization/Location: Mendon, MI

Job Type: Part Time

Job Information: Crossroads Missionary Church Part Time Worship Leader Position Oct 2017

Closing Date: November 6, 2017

Firefly

Posting Date: October 6, 2017

Position(s): Caregiver

Organization/Location: Various

Job Type: Full Time

Job Information: Firefly New Caregiver flier_Made a difference lately Oct 2017

Closing Date: November 6, 2017

Omni Credit Union

Date: October 6, 2017

Position(s): Part Time Personal Advisor

Organization/Location: Three Rivers, MI

Job Type: Part Time

Job Information: Omni Credit Union Oct 2017Posting

Closing Date: November 6, 2017

Girls on the Run

Posting Date: October 5, 2017

Position(s): Program Assistant 5K Coordinator

Organization/Location: Southwest Michigan area

Job Type: Part Time

Job Information: Girls on the Run Program Assistant 5k Coordinator Job Description

Closing Date:November 5, 2017

Republic Services

Posting Date: October 5, 2017

Position(s): Diesel Technicians

Organization/Location: Elkhart and Culver Indiana

Job Type: Full Time

Job Information: Republic Services Poster – Hiring Diesel Techs

Closing Date: November 5, 2017

Community is invited to Glen Oaks Foundation’s Third Annual Gala “Diamonds, Donors and Dollars for Scholars” – Sat., Oct. 14

The Glen Oaks Community College Foundation will hold the Third Annual Gala “Diamonds, Donors and Dollars for Scholars,” on Saturday, Oct. 14 at 6 p.m. in the college’s Dresser Business Development Center.

The public is invited to join alumni and friends of the college to this extravaganza. “Last year the event raised over $13,000 for scholarships,” said Pam Hughes, executive director of the Glen Oaks Foundation.

Hors d’ oeuvres and drinks will be served from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Guests will have the opportunity to participate in a silent/live auction and win a half-carat diamond by Fiebig Jewelers. Highlighted auction items include a week’s stay at a cabin on Diamond Lake, a weekend stay at Firekeeper’s Casino Hotel and tuition and fees to apply toward an associate degree.

Tickets are $50 per person.  Reserved tables are available for party(s) of six. Call Pam Hughes at (269) 294-4384 for more information.

 

Assistant Softball Coach

Posting Date: September 20, 2017

Job Information: Assistant Softball Coach

Position Type: Part-Time, Contracted

Closing Date: Open Until Filled

Assistant Women’s Basketball

Posting Date: September 20, 2017

Position Information: Assist Women’s Basketball

Job Type: Part-Time, Contracted

Closing Date: Open Until Filled

Verizon – Your Wireless Store

Posting Date: September 20, 2017

Position(s):Inside Sales/Customer Service

Organization/Location: Three Rivers, MI

Job Type: Full Time

Job Information: Verizon September 20, 2017

Closing Date: October 20, 2017

Historical sign to mark site of former White Pigeon High School—Glen Oaks beginnings

On Monday, Sept. 18, Glen Oaks Community College will unveil a historical marker that identifies the site of the college’s beginnings 50 years ago. That site was the former White Pigeon High School at 201 S. Lincoln St., White Pigeon. The college will recognize the significance of those days of early beginnings at 10 a.m., at the site of the marker, located beside the White Pigeon Central Elementary School, 305 E. Hotchin Ave.

“Anyone in the community is invited to stop by and see the marker, and we extend a special invitation to those who were students, faculty and staff during those first days of the college,” said David Devier, Glen Oaks president. “Please join us in sharing stories of the early days of the college.”

“According to the publications, the 40 year-old White Pigeon High School was scheduled for demolition,” said Devier, “and that was put on hold as college officials scurried to put together a temporary location to house the Glen Oaks students and start programming,” said Devier. “Offices were set up in the school in June, as newly hired faculty and staff prepared for the upcoming semester.

Records show 729 students were enrolled for the first semester. According to the book “Glen Oaks Community College” by Leland Thornton, former Glen Oaks faculty member. “After three days of taking standardized tests, the students attended classes for the first time on Friday, Sept. 15. On the following Monday, Sept. 18, classes ‘started for real,’ and the residents of White Pigeon found out what it was like to have approximately 500 additional automobiles parked on the streets.
“The college is said to have occupied just about every available space in the town of White Pigeon,” said Devier. “In addition, there were also classes in Coldwater as enrollment had exceeded expectations, and faculty and staff worked to accommodate the students.”

Glen Oaks operated out of the facility during its inaugural year and a half while officials worked on plans and construction of the Shimmel Rd. campus.

Student Ambassador Scholarship Application Now Open

The 2017-2018 Student Ambassador Scholarship is now available. The search is on for students that are outgoing, dependable, and want to represent Glen Oaks at various campus functions. Please get your application to the Admissions office by 4:00 pm on Sept 11th.
Applications are available in Student Services and online under Open Scholarships from the following web page:
https://www.glenoaks.edu/student-services/financial-aid/scholarships/
Please contact the GOCC Financial Aid Office with any questions at 269-294-4260 and financialaid@glenoaks.edu.

*Current high school students are not eligible

Evening Library Clerk/Computer-Media Assistant

Posting Date:  August 24, 2017

Position Title: Evening Library Clerk/Computer-Media Assistant

Position Info: Evening Library

Closing Date: Open Until Filled

A New Day at GOCC

by Dr. David Devier, Glen Oaks president

This August 26th, a new day begins at Glen Oaks Community College.  We will move our first class of students into our new housing facility – Devier Student Suites.  This monumental activity means that life will never be the same on campus going forward.  Never again will we all go home on a Friday/Saturday afternoon and forget about the operations.  Now students will be on campus 24/7.

This change has been two years in the making.  When the idea of building a housing facility on campus was first introduced most said it will never happen – we hammered this all out before and decided it would not work.  Much to the credit of the GOCC Board of Trustees, they said, “Let’s look again.”  As the visioning process unfolded, it became clear that there is a real need for student housing here because there is very limited housing in the region.  In addition, if the college would offer housing, special ‘niche’ programs may be developed that will also attract students from across Michigan, northern Indiana and beyond.

Also the new facility will help create a stronger experience and learning environment.  This will dramatically raise the campus engagement for students which will support their learning and as a result, will increase student success.  The faculty and staff will also gain satisfaction from working with on-campus students who have fewer distractions than commuter students.  These opportunities will energize the total campus year round.  “What a wonderful new day.”

I am pleased to invite you to the Dedication and Grand Opening of the Devier Student Suites on August 25 at 4 p.m.  We will hear from those who played a role in the project as well as our federal and state officials associated with the USDA Rural Development Agency who provided the low interest loan to build the project.  All guests will be invited to tour the facility on this afternoon before the students move in on Saturday, August 26th.  All are welcome and will no doubt enjoy the excitement of the ‘New Day.’  I hope to see you on the 25th!

Glen Oaks gears up for ‘Student Move-in Day’ for new housing facility – Sat., Aug. 26

Glen Oaks Community College is gearing up to move over 80 students into their new on-campus living quarters, Devier Student Suites, on Saturday, Aug. 26 between 8 a.m. and noon.

“We are anticipating over 300 people to participate including students, parents, and faculty and staff volunteers,” said April Yost, director of student housing, Capstone On-Campus Management, the firm hired to manage the student life experience.

“Students will be moving into the new $6.5 million complex with a full weekend lineup of activities that are planned to help them get acquainted and acclimated as they settle in,” said Yost. “We’ve ordered carts to help them move their belongings from their vehicles to their rooms in the morning, a cookout lunch is planned for all, and Saturday evening events include a student social activity.”

“Chadwick McConnell has been hired as the new assistant director of housing and he will reside on-campus and direct the day-to-day residence hall activities,” said Yost. “We will also have three student residence assistants who will help organize social, educational and cultural events for students, provide extended office hour coverage and assist with support and problem solving.”

The three-story facility has two- and four-bedroom suites (108 beds in all), and is the first such project in Michigan to be funded by a USDA Rural Development loan. Each suite has a full kitchen and fully furnished living space and three levels of security. Shared amenities include a lobby, fireplace, study and meeting spaces on all floors.

The suites are named for President and Mrs. Devier in recognition of the vision Dr. Devier provided in leading the College from concept to reality.

Grand Opening of Devier Student Suites set for Fri., Aug. 25; public is invited to join in the celebration

What began as an idea to build a residence hall on the campus of Glen Oaks Community College more than two years ago is about to become a reality.

The grand opening of the David H. and Patricia A. Devier Student Suites will be held on Friday, August 25 from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. in a celebratory tent just outside the new facility. Invited are faculty, staff, students, alumni, dignitaries and the general public.

Planned are remarks from federal, state and local officials and Glen Oaks administrators prior to the official ribbon cutting ceremony. Glen Oaks will formally recognize the partner representatives in the project including the US Department of Agriculture, Frederick Construction Inc., Capstone On-Campus Management, Hollis and Miller Architects and Student Suites. Participants will be treated to appetizers, cupcakes, ice tea and lemonade.

The project is the first student housing project at the college, a $6.5 million investment in the college, students, St. Joseph County and the Southwest Michigan region.

The three-story facility has two- and four-bedroom suites (108 beds in all), and is the first such project in Michigan to be funded by a USDA Rural Development loan. Each suite has a full kitchen and fully furnished living space and three levels of security. Shared amenities include a lobby, fireplace, study and meeting spaces on all floors.

The suites are named for President and Mrs. Devier in recognition of the vision Dr. Devier provided in leading the College from concept to reality.

“With limited housing in the region, the residence hall provides our students an opportunity to experience campus life while pursuing their education at a much lower cost.” said David Devier, Glen Oaks president. “Residential housing is a significant asset that gives us the opportunity to develop and offer ‘niche’ programs to attract students from across Michigan, northern Indiana and beyond.”

Frederick Construction, Inc., headquartered in Vicksburg, Michigan, was the general contractor for the facility; Hollis/Miller Architects of Kansas City, Missouri, designed the project with input from a team of Glen Oaks administrators, faculty, staff and students.

Glen Oaks is the ninth Michigan Community College to add residence halls to its campus.

Glen Oaks offers Summer Bridge program to boost English and math skills

Students wishing to attend Glen Oaks Community College in the fall, who may be feeling nervous or stressed about the college entrance exam, now have the opportunity to enhance their English and math skills prior to the start of the fall semester.

The Summer Bridge program, designed to better prepare students for Accuplacer testing and subsequent college coursework, is scheduled from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on August 8,9,10,15, 16 and 17. The program is free and includes lunch. Students will take the Accuplacer pre-test for English and Math to determine their strengths and weaknesses. Test results will establish individual areas of focus. Students should attend all sessions to maximize their scores. At the end, they will be re-tested to determine knowledge gained.

“Bridge programs such as this can increase the comfort level for the students,” said Irene Elksnis-Geisler, director of the Tutoring and Testing Center.  “Students who may feel that they aren’t ready for college math or English may find that the boost they get from the program is enough to give them the confidence they need to place into college-level courses and get a jump start on learning.”

Subjects covered in the program include: sentence skills, reading comprehension, basic math, elementary algebra and college-level math.

Students interested in participating in the program should contact the Glen Oaks Tutoring and Testing Center at the College at (269) 294-4270.

Developing Your Portfolio for College Credit

Developing Your Portfolio for College Credit is a free, self-paced course that guides students through the process of creating a course-match prior learning assessment portfolio for evaluation by LearningCounts. After completing the course, students can submit a portfolio for assessment by CAEL-trained faculty assessors with the appropriate subject matter expertise.

The Good Work of Glen Oaks

I have reported in the recent past about some of the successes of Glen Oaks Community College in serving our region’s students and communities. Here I will provide greater detail concerning the breadth and depth of the good work being carried out.

The previous reports outlined the significant numbers of dual enrollment and early middle students the college is serving.  The data reported here will expand in outlining the amazing student success these programs have fostered.

The data related to the dual enrollment and career technical education has shown significant increases over the past several years.  During the past year (2016-17 Fall and Winter enrollments), 1,091 of GOCC’s 2,366 non-duplicated students were in high school. They were either enrolled in classes held at the college, online or on the high school campuses. These data reveal Glen Oaks is directly impacting the educational attainment level of the greater St. Joseph County region.

In an earlier piece, I reported that 81percent of the high school seniors the college dual enrolled in years 2012-16 (n=1,006).  Of these, 225 have attended GOCC at some point since high school graduation. The data I will present here shows what these students have achieved compared to a similar group of regional students who did not enroll with GOCC as high school students.

On all measurement categories the students who had dual enrolled with Glen Oaks have performed at higher levels than those who had not.  Examples include higher grade point averages 2.97 vs 2.20; greater number of credits earned, 39 vs 23; more students graduating, 28 percent versus 10 percent; more students transferring to four-year institution, 17 percent versus 11 percent; and more students meeting at least one success criteria, 75 percent versus 56 percent.

As one can see, there appears to be a direct link between Glen Oaks student success and high school dual enrollment.  While these data are exciting, they only apply to 22 percent of the 1,006 seniors who were dual enrolled years 2012-16.  It is difficult to ascertain the success of the 590 students who attended other higher education institutions after being dual enrolled at GOCC.

We are working with some of our partner four-year institutions to establish the performance of these students on their campuses.  We do have some preliminary data from the University of Michigan and Trine University.  They both report that our students have been academically successful.  Over time, we plan to collect as much data as possible concerning the success of all the region high school’s Dual Enrollment and Early/Middle College students as possible.

In closing, it is very rewarding to report all the “good work” the college is doing to add value to our students’ lives and communities’ futures.  The end result is – Glen Oaks is helping to raise the educational attainment and economic levels of our citizens.

David H. Devier
President, Glen Oaks Community College

 

Former Detroit Lions kicker Jason Hanson to speak as part of Glen Oaks Viking Speaker Series – Thursday, July 20

Glen Oaks Community College will host Jason Hanson, former Detroit Lions kicker, the first speaker in the 2017-18 Viking Speaker Series. The event will be held on Thursday, July 20 at 6 p.m. in the Nora Hagen Theatre on the campus of Glen Oaks Community College.  The event is sponsored by Sturgis Media Group and Glen Oaks Community College Foundation and is free and open to the public.

Hanson was drafted by the Lions in the second round of the 1992 NFL Draft out of Washington State University.  He played in the NFL for 21 years as the kicker for the Detroit Lions. Retiring in 2013, he set the record for the most games played by one player with one team.

There will be a reception following his talk on the concourse where he will sign autographs. Participants are encouraged to bring their own items for him to sign. In addition, there will be items available for purchase.

Born in Spokane, Washington, Hanson graduated from Mead High School where he lettered in football, basketball and soccer. As a senior, Hanson won All-Greater Spokane League honors as both a kicker and punter and was named a first team All-State honoree by the Washington Sportswriters Association. In the classroom at Mead, he maintained a perfect 4.0 grade point average.

Hanson was named the 2002 recipient of the Detroit Lions/Detroit Sports Broadcasters Association/Pro Football Writers Association’s Media-Friendly “Good Guy” Award. The Good Guy Award is given yearly to the Detroit Lions player who shows consideration to, and cooperation with the media at all times during the course of the season.

The Detroit Lions inducted Hanson into the Ring of Honor in fall 2013 at Ford Field for his success and dedication to Detroit Lions football.

Area high school football coaches and teams have been invited to participate in this event.

The Viking Speaker Series was recently reinstated as one of College Council’s initiatives and the hope is to offer a broad range of topics and bring diverse speakers to campus.

Parking for the event is free.

South Bend Cubs gathering open to Alumni and Friends of Glen Oaks Community College – Sunday, July 16

Glen Oaks Community College will host a day at the South Bend Cubs ballgame at Four Winds Field on Sunday, July 16 at 2:05 p.m.

Each participants will enjoy a reserved seat on the Home Run Porch, receive a South Bend Cubs baseball cap, and will be treated to grilled hamburgers, hot dogs, chips, corn on the cob, water and soda. Transportation is included, but is optional. Cost is $32 per person.

“The event is sponsored by the Glen Oaks Community College Alumni and Friends Association,” said Pam Hughes, director of the GOCC Foundation. “This is one of several events planned to promote camaraderie among those who share a common bond and appreciation for the college.

The Association was formed last fall,” said Hughes. “We hope to offer three to four events a year. Some events will be more social in nature while others – more educational. As a community college, we define alumni as anyone who has taken one or more courses at the college, and since we are a community college we consider our community as our friends.”

To learn more about the event or to reserve your tickets, contact Pam Hughes at (269) 294-4384. Cash, check and credit cards are accepted

GLen Oaks announces Winter 2017 scholars

Glen Oaks Community College announces its outstanding scholars for the Winter 2017 Semester. Students on the President’s Honor Roll achieved a grade point average of 3.75-4.0. Students on the Dean’s Honor Roll achieved a grade point average of 3.5-3.74. The students are listed alphabetically according to their towns of residency.

 

President’s List

MICHIGAN
Athens

Amy Kline

Bronson
Stacie Cleland, Kaitlyn Czajkowski, Brandi Fox, Adyson Lasky, Kiana Mayer, Jocelyn McMichael, Chaselyn Preston, Jillian Pyles, Morgan Rose, Gracelynn Shortridge, Allison Sikorski

Burlington
Baylie Harvey

Burr Oak
Samantha Cupp, KaitlynJordan, Yan Ting Liew, Tiffany Middaugh

Centreville
Andrea Bell, Nicole Elkins, Robert Frederick, Kathryn Gage, Hannah Griffith, Kayla Jepsen, JonahKirby, Keyara Long, Alexander Meyer, Kalotina Spanos, Courtney Stauffer, Rebecca Warner

Coldwater
Bryce Kosmerick

Colon
Daniel Alva, Morgan  Czajkowski, Bailey Fisher, Kennedy Hawkins, Rachel Jensen, Camille McKenzie, Jessica Overholt, Abby Saxman, Kathleen Shackleton, Stacy Sharp, Rebecca Shuler, Garrick Yaudes

 Constantine
Cara Fries, Kelsey Holmes, Jaycie Howard, Shelbie Howard, Kelly Lucarelle, Sydney Pedersen, Tina Pusateri, Trasandra Ragsdale, Roopa Singh

Jones
Brian Hutchinson, Havin McKay

Lawton
Kelsea Hegenauer

Leonidas
Kali Tyler

Marcellus
Rheanna Graver

Mendon
Seth Burpee, Kendra Classen, Wyatt Cool, Wyatt Cupp, Morgan Eckert, Sydney Griffith, Jacob Hagenbuch, Alexander Heckman, Connor Henckel, Ashley Kuhlman, Alexis Leighton, Olivia Leighton, Mary Leighton, Makenzie Oatley, Meagon Persing, Cassandra Plummer, Dylan Plummer, Hannah Rice, Courtney Ridenour, Paige Russell, Braxton Samson, Angela Smith, Brooke Vanzoest

Nottawa
Alexis Bennett

Sherwood
Abigail Stoll

Sturgis
Meaghan Anderson, Joseph Erwin Atienza, Lenore Borden, Miranda Bystry, Alycia Carpenter, Madisyn Chapman, Sarah Cline, Matthew Davis, Vanessa Delgado, Summer Dowell, Anne Eichorn, Carina Geigley, JeremyGooch, Phyllis Guijosa, Ashley Hambright, Allison Herman, Lauren Kane, Anthony Kuhbander, Rudie Lantz, Hope Lee, Ethan Long, Marie Maldonado, Storm Marusek, Hailey McClimans, Mark Meek, Daniel Monahan, Lorina Mullett         , William Murphy, Trista Nelson, Lydia Oman, Monica Picker, Samantha Prestidge, Sarah Quirin,         Noah Roberts, Anna Rueppel, Diana Sanchez, Kalee Schrock, Elisha Schultz, Sarah Warner, Edna Yoder

Three Rivers
Rachael Arrington, Victoria Bass, Kegan Binkley, Payton Boembeke, Brittany Bowers,  Mary Bright, Keny Chapman, Darian Cole, Charlene Corwin, Rex Crotser, Christopher Dao, Krystal Davis. Audrey DePierre, Audrey Fenwick, Pamella Frye, John Paul Gamet-Herendeen, Riley Garver, Megan Happel, Alyssa Hull-Nerad, Judah Kay, John Londono, Alison Lorenz, MacKenzie Mehaney, Collin Meyer, Meryn Mostrom, Stephen Murphy, Mary Quinn, Tatum Rice, Seth Salinas, Paige Schoon, Samantha Sigman, AshleySmith, Amber Speece, Roy Stafford, Julia Sutter, Matthew Velez, Victoria Wheeler, Zoey Willson, Megan Zinsmaster

Union City
Abigail McKinnon, Brianna Olsen

Vandalia
Michelle Chiddister, Samantha Mohney

White Pigeon
Makenna Bolinger, Skyler DeMeyer, Kathrina Hagner, Melanie Laferty, Tiffany Miller, Jordan Smith

INDIANA

Goshen
Calsey Gruzdov

Shipshewana
Amanda Eiseman, Lauren Lamb

ALASKA
Anchorage
Amber Chapman

DEAN’S LIST

MICHIGAN    

Bronson
Lauren Cary, America DePaz Leon, Nathaniel Mittler, Ashley Saterlee, Elayna Swift, Chase Thrams, Brooklynn Zellner

Burlington
Emma Elgan, Taylor Vrooman

Burr Oak
Caleb Happner, Brandon Hernandez, Brenden Kelley, Katrina Orsie, Hannah Root, Dylan Schwartz, Connor Swihart, Ryan Waltke, Marlena Wells

Centreville
Kayla Brown, Rebecca Clementz, Kristal Keith, Jasmine Long, Graham Morrison, Collin Schlabach

Coldwater
Brendan Behnke, Desirae Case, Melina Corona, Lucas Disbro, Chase Gibson, Joshua Lee, Mercedes Locklin, Garrett Snyder

 Colon
Alison Case, Andrew Lash, Nicholas Martin, Megan Martin, Madison Miller, Hillary Miller, Mariah Seiber, Spencer Smolarz, Emily Vendal, Dane Wilson

Constantine
Tyler Carpenter, Rachel Dingess, Hannah Fries, Jessica Hale, Malorie Hulse, Bailey Potter, Chelsea Schoetzow, Tori Schroeder, Courteney Swartz

Dowagiac
Alisa West

Kalamazoo
Maeve Dickmon

Marcellus
Ashley Ives

Mendon
Cole Burpee, Emma Eberstein, Blake Everson, Amanda Holst, Kerri Kline, Emily Loudenslager, Jordan Medich, Kaley Smith, Katelyn Thornton, Theresa Yoder

Portage
Kyle Kuzmick, Joseph Stonebraker

Sherwood
Cody Baker, Alyssa Howard, Vicky Kruszka, Jhenna Puckett

Sturgis
Karla Arvizo, Kyle Bueno, Arianna Clemens, Darcy Clouse, Karla Costilla Urbina, Richard Davidson, Taylor DeBoard, Stacey Delmark, Ramiro Flores, Shae Hamlin, Sarah Howk, Taylor Keller, Jacob Land, Brenda Lopez Esparza, Janel Meese, Rebecca Mulkey, Eberle Myers, Victor Naik, James Opdycke, Gerardo Ortega, Maritza Ramirez, Rebecca Richards, Viviana Rubio, Zachariah Schlabach, Joseph Vershay, Ann Ware, Breanna Watwood, Amanda Wilcox

Three Rivers
Paul Baldwin, Maegan Bierlein, Leah Crooks, Bettina Emory, Hannah Frye, Aleesa Gatton, Sheila Hall, Aaron Hassinger, Samuel Hawkins, Ashley Hayes, Alexis Jacobs, Olivia Judsen, Xaiver Kunz, Rebecca Lorenz, Kalvin Ludwig, Zachary Ludwig, Alexis Matthews, Mary Miller, Justin Ochsenrider, Jade Okoniewski, Matthew Paavola, Lindsey     Phillips, Jacob Prowett, Camryn Rhodes, Jeshe Rhodes, Tiana Sternbergh, Jackline Warpenburg, Jacqueline Willey

Union
Gabrielle Russell

Union City
Rachel Lipscomb

Vicksburg
Mindy Lux

Wayland
Danielle Worvey

White Pigeon
Hannah Carr, Carly Corder, Jonathan Knautz, Nayeli Montoya-Espinal

INDIANA
Lagrange

Britany Bills

MATH 060 Basic Mathematics Skills


1 Credits, 1 Contacts

This course is designed to provide students with the skills necessary to be successful in Algebra. The self-paced course will lead students through three areas as needed; fractions, decimals and percentages.

 

Prerequisite: None

Glen Oaks to hold 14th Annual Athletic Scholarship Golf Outing – Fri., June 23

The Glen Oaks Community College Athletic Department will hold its annual golf outing on Friday, June 23 at the Klinger Lake Country Club.

The event will begin with registration at 10:30 a.m., lunch at 11 a.m. and shotgun start at noon. This is a four-person scramble, with many prizes.

Cost is $90 per golfer and includes 18 holes of golf, cart, lunch and a gift. Proper attire required – collared shirt and dress shorts or slacks. No tennis shoes, jeans or cut-offs. The funds raised plays a large part in helping Glen Oaks athletes compete at the college level.

Sponsorship opportunities are available. For more information on participation in the outing or for sponsorship levels, please contact Courtney Ivan, athletic director at (269) 294-4213.

 

Swartz Scholarship awarded to GOCC’s Jeremy M. Gooch

Jeremy M. Gooch, of Sturgis, Michigan, has been awarded the Professor Emeritus B. Swartz Scholarship for Excellence in Mathematics.

Gooch graduated with an Associate of General Studies degree during Glen Oaks graduation ceremony in early May. He plans to attend a private college to finish his four-year degree in electrical engineering and someday work in designing and constructing robots.

A home schooled student, Gooch entered the U.S. Marines upon receiving his high school diploma. While in the service, Gooch spent four years in administration and four years as a helicopter mechanic working on attack and utility helicopters.

Gooch served as the secretary to Phi Theta Kappa, the national honor society for two-year colleges. During his time at Glen Oaks he also served as a tutor in the college’s Tutoring and Testing Center. He is an avid reader and enjoys running in his spare time.

The $1,000 scholarship is awarded to a Glen Oaks student with an outstanding record in mathematic courses. Gooch was recommended for the scholarship by Glen Oaks mathematics instructors.

Under terms of the scholarship created through a donation by Mr. Bernard Swartz, a former professor of mathematics at Glen Oaks Community College, the student must be transferring to a four-year university after graduating from Glen Oaks. The scholarship is intended to assist a student with educational expenses at a four-year institution.

Glen Oaks to hold 49th Annual Commencement Ceremony on Fri., May 5; Nursing and Allied Health pinning ceremonies – Sat., May 6

Glen Oaks Community College will hold its 49th Annual Commencement Ceremony at 7 p.m. on Friday, May 5, in Ken Shuler Court (Glen Oaks gymnasium). The Nursing Pinning ceremony will be held on Saturday, May 6 at 10 a.m. in Ken Schuler Court and the Allied Health Pinning ceremony will be held on Saturday, May 6 at 2 p.m. in the Nora Hagen Theatre.

There are 152 pending graduates with degrees and/or certificates. Their average age is 24.6 years—the youngest is 18 and the most senior is 58 years young. Their average GPA is 3.3. There are seven graduating via special graduation initiatives of Win-Win and Credit When Credit is Due initiative which reaches out to potential graduates who have transferred to four-year institutions. There are three dual enrolled high school students and one Early Middle College student who will all be graduating from Glen Oaks before graduating from their own high schools. There are 112 graduates participating in the ceremony.

Glen Oaks President David Devier will preside over the ceremony and will recognize recipients of several special awards including:

  • Distinguished Alumni Award – Mark C. Zona
  • Fellows Awards – Dr. Dennis P. McCarthy
  • Adjunct Faculty Teaching Excellence Award – Michael W. White
  • Outstanding Service Award – Kathleen M. Patrick
  • J. Shaheen Chair for Teaching Excellence – Sarah Simmons
  • President’s Award – Jeremy M. Gooch

President Devier will confer the degrees and Dr. Patricia Morgenstern, dean of academics and extended learning, and will serve as grand marshal for the ceremony. Tonya Howden, assistant dean of students, and Beverly Andrews, assistant dean of enrollment services/registrar, will read the names of the candidates as they walk across the platform to receive their degrees.

The Vintage Brass will provide music for the ceremony.

A short video “Reel in Your Success” will be shown and features Glen Oaks alumnus and television personality Mark Zona, of Centreville, MI, and host of “Zona’s Awesome Fishing Show,” which airs on the Outdoor Channel.

Tickets are required for guests to attend the graduation. Each student participating in the ceremony is eligible to receive up to eight general admission seating guest tickets. Requests may be made for additional tickets by contacting Diane Zinsmaster at (269) 294-4233. Accommodations can be also made for those requiring wheelchairs at this number.

The College holds graduation exercises annually in the spring. A listing of the graduates will be available in June. Free parking will be available to all guests. The college is located at 62249 Shimmel Rd., in Centreville, Mich.

 

Background on award recipients

Distinguished Alumni Award – Mark C. Zona

This award recognizes alumni who have distinguished themselves through professional excellence and personal service.  This year’s award goes to Mark C. Zona.

Mark Zona is a 1995 graduate of Glen Oaks Community College with an Associate of Arts degree.

Although from Chicago, he started fishing when he was old enough to walk on the lakes between Sturgis and Kalamazoo. His first fishing derby was on Lake Templene with a friend when he was just nine years old and they won the tournament, splitting $1,100. It wasn’t long after that that he knew he wanted to be a professional bass fisherman when he grew up.

Although he didn’t see the need to attend college for this career, he reluctantly listened to the advice his parents and high school counselors to receive higher educational training. His CHOICE was Glen Oaks since it was near the lakes where he fished. He is said to have gone fishing before class, beach his boat, go to class and then back to his fishing spot.

Zona started fishing in professional tournaments after graduation along with holding many positions within the fishing industry including retail marine sales, professional fishing, corporate promotions and instructional seminars.

It was a call he received in 2004 from ESPN about auditioning to co-host “Loudmouth Bass,” then, the Bassmaster’s television, which changed his life. This was his entrance into the world of television.

Zona’s spontaneity and humor has made him one of the most recognizable fishing personalities. He now has his own television show, “Zona’s Awesome Fishing Show,” which airs on the Outdoor Channel. He is one of those rare personalities who is unscripted, unpredictable, and humorous. Each new cast is a mystery – but it is always FUN. His genuine passion for life and his profession clearly shine through. His sponsors include the likes of some of the big name sponsors such as Chrysler/RAM, Carhartt, Bass Pro Shops, Mercury, and many others.

Zona and his family have a strong passion for St. Joseph County. He and his wife, Karin, moved back to St. Joseph County to raise their twins, Hunter and Jacob, who attend Centreville, High School and are currently also a part of the St. Joseph County Early Middle College program. The Zona family continues to work to make this area a better place to live. They recently served as honorary chairs for the St. Joseph County United Way Campaign.

 

Fellows Award – Dr. Dennis P. McCarthy

The Glen Oaks Community College Fellows Award recognizes a community member and/or institution for outstanding service to and/or in support of Glen Oaks. This year’s Fellows Award recipient is Dr. Dennis P. McCarthy.

Dr. Dennis McCarthy served as a full-time administrator on the Glen Oaks Leadership Team. He is highly regarded by all who worked with him, including students, staff, college administrators, community members as well as professional peers in most all regions of Michigan. He has also served on several boards and organizations in the community.

McCarthy worked in many capacities of leadership over the years he was affiliated with the college. The number of students, staff, and administrator lives he touched and mentored is countless. His leadership was instrumental in securing millions of dollars in grant monies to the institution in the quest for quality, improvement, sound decision-making and helping students and the institution succeed.

Adjunct Faculty Teaching Excellence Award – Michael W. White

This award is presented annually to a part-time faculty member who demonstrates excellence in teaching and who reflects the value of education to students of Glen Oaks Community College.

Michael White has been teaching for the college since the beginning of the Criminal Justice program three years ago. He teaches a variety of the Criminal Justice classes, is passionate about the subject and police work, and is said to be a true team player by his co-workers. White continuously displays respect for others, concern for students and he has a strong work ethic.  This is how he operates on a daily basis for all his students and anyone who interacts with him. He is said to always go above and beyond the task at hand.
Outstanding Service Award – Kathleen M. Patrick
This award recognizes employees of Glen Oaks for outstanding performance and contributions to the College. This year’s award goes to Kathleen Patrick.

Kathleen Patrick is executive assistant to the athletic director. She has been an employee of the college for 29 years. Through the years, she has been nothing but extremely professional and always more than willing to help out in any way that she can. She is warm and welcoming to every student, staff and faculty member that she interacts with – greeting everyone with a willingness of “how can I help you?” Patrick represents Glen Oak positively both internally and externally. She is said to be a beacon of shining light and positivity with an infectious laugh and smile. The value and service she brings to Glen Oaks is unmeasurable.

J. Shaheen Chair for Teaching Excellence – Sarah J. Simmons

(Please note there is a separate feature media release on Sarah Simmons for a potential separate article.)

The E. J. Shaheen Chair for Teaching and Excellence Award was initiated in 1984 with a generous donation from E. J. Shaheen, one of the original Glen Oaks Board members. Shaheen, a college professor, lawyer and business owner, placed a high value on education and spent much of his later life in promoting high quality education and education institutions, including Glen Oaks. This year’s recipient is Sarah J. Simmons.

Sarah Simmons is an outstanding person, faculty member and professor of chemistry. Simmons is a leader in educational innovation, always improving her techniques and assessing her effectiveness. One of her students stated, “Glen Oaks has so many awesome professors, but Professor Simmons has stood out as extremely professional, knowledgeable, and with the unique ability to really make her lectures have a deeper impact resulting in a greater understanding of chemistry. She recently “flipped” her classroom, which shifts instruction to a learner-center model in which class time explores topics in greater depth while online videos and other types of instructional content are delivered in a variety of formats outside the classroom. Simmons is said to care deeply about the success of her students, pushing them to do their best.

President’s Award – Jeremy M. Gooch
This award recognizes a student who has been nominated by the faculty for his/her high achievement in academics. This year’s recipient is Jeremy Gooch.

Jeremy Gooch is graduating with an Associate of General Studies degree. Gooch was home-schooled and entered the U.S. Marine Corps after receiving his high school diploma. While in the service, Gooch spent four years in administration and four years as a helicopter mechanic working on attack and utility helicopters.

Upon leaving military service, he enrolled at Glen Oaks as a non-traditional student. His plans are to attend a private college to finish his four-year degree in electrical engineering. He sees himself working in polytechnic robotics where he would work in design and construction of robots.

While at Glen Oaks, Gooch was a Phi Theta Kappa member, recently serving as the secretary to the chapter. He is a recipient of the Professor Emeritus Bernard Swartz scholarship for Excellence in Mathematics. Schwartz also served as a tutor in the college’s Tutoring and Testing Center. He is an avid reader and he enjoys running in his spare time.

Glen Oaks to launch new program in Agricultural Equipment Technology this fall—only program of its kind in the state

Glen Oaks Community College is pleased to announce a new associate and certificate program in Agricultural Equipment Technology that will launch this fall.

The two-year, daytime associate degree program will train students to diagnose, service, repair, maintain and overhaul farm equipment. Students will receive state-of-the-art technical training on the latest major brand equipment through a combination of classroom instruction, hands-on laboratory activities and supervised occupational work experience at a dealership.

“We’re particularly excited because we will be the only community college in the state of Michigan to offer such a program,” said Dr. David Devier, Glen Oaks president. “We are located in rural southwest Michigan where farming is all around us. Modern farming machinery is complex and requires well-trained technicians and the area farm equipment dealers are in search of skilled technicians. We want to help fill this need.”

The program prepares students for all equipment brands and associated technologies. It will be offered in a cohort group format that will take place at Burnips Equipment Co., 55232 Franklin Dr., in Three Rivers, Michigan.

“Over the summer, we will be converting a corner of the Burnips building into a classroom,” said Devier. “Having the program at the dealership allows the students to receive hands-on training,” said Devier. “The program prepares students for all equipment brands and associated technologies.”

To learn more about the Agricultural Equipment Technology program, contact the Glen Oaks Admissions Dept. at (269) 294-4253.

Simmons receives prestigious E. J. Shaheen award during 49th annual Glen Oaks commencement – the chemistry was right for teaching after all

Growing up in the small town of Scotts, Michigan, Sarah Simmons was that person who “loved to learn” in school.  She graduated from Climax-Scotts High School and enrolled at Albion College as a pre-med major but after taking her first chemistry class, she quickly discovered her new love for the subject.

“Chemistry opened up an entire world of creativity and excitement,” said Simmons. “I had great chemistry mentors at Albion, and they are the reason that I am teaching today.”

Simmons was selected as the recipient of the 2016-17 E. J. Shaheen Teaching Excellence Award. The announcement of the award was made by Glen Oaks President David Devier during the 49th Glen Oaks commencement ceremony on May 5. The award was initiated in 1984 with a generous donation from E. J. Shaheen, one of the original Glen Oaks board members, a college professor, lawyer and business owner, who placed a high value on education and spent much of his later life promoting high quality education.

Viewed by her peers as a person of great integrity, it is said that Simmons’ passion is to actively engage students in the learning process. She continuously looks for ways to bring chemistry to life for students, often using quirky analogies to help students better understand difficult material.

As an undergraduate student, Albion sent Simmons to Wales to do chemistry research through a National Science Foundation grant. There she researched ways to make pharmaceuticals in a more environmentally friendly way.

Following graduation from Albion in 2007 with a Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry, she enrolled in a master’s program in chemistry at the University of Michigan. “I was actually leaning toward continued research in pharmaceuticals,” said Simmons, “thinking that I would someday end up in research and development in the pharmaceutical industry.

Simmons had never seen herself as a teacher and she claimed at the time that she didn’t have the personality for teaching. But graduating with a focus in organic chemistry in 2009 and toward the beginning of the economic recession, her professors encouraged her to teach a General Chemistry freshmen class at Albion.

“They trusted me and knew my abilities,” said Simmons. “I took on the challenge and felt like I was a terrible teacher at first.  I had to learn to connect with the students and break down the material into concepts that they could understand.”

This turned out to be a wonderful experience for Simmons after all, and that summer she took on two more adjunct faculty roles teaching Intro to Chemistry classes at both Jackson and Washtenaw Community Colleges.

During that summer, she began an active job search and applied at Glen Oaks. “I got the job in August and had to quickly put together the course materials before the start of the semester,” said Simmons. “The pressure was on – I was a 24-year old chemistry teacher replacing Wayne Moss, who had just retired after teaching chemistry at Glen Oaks for 42 years.”

“It was overwhelming at first,” said Simmons. “I relied on my mentor and friend, Jeff Hucko, biology professor, who had also just been hired by the college, but who had 11 years of teaching experience.”

Simmons appreciates the very nurturing and professional relationship of all of the Science department faculty. “Even today, we continue to challenge each other and help each other grow,” said Simmons. “They are all amazing people.”

Simmons is said to be uncompromising in her pursuit of helping students succeed.  When asked about a “shining moment,” she says that taking on the challenge of developing the “Student Success” class was that moment. “This was an eye opening experience that helped me to see the students from a holistic view. Clearly, students’ lives—their life situations and their support systems help determine how they will do in their classes. It’s so important for them to believe in themselves.”

Simmons cares deeply for her students and says her favorite part of teaching today is seeing the moment when everything clicks for them.

For the future, Simmons continues to make her classes more engaging and more student centered by getting the students to make the connections with one another. “Not only do they challenge one another in chemistry, but also in their lives,” said Simmons. She recently “flipped” her classroom, which shifts instruction to a learner-center model in which class time explores topics in greater depth while online videos and other types of instructional content are delivered in a variety of formats outside the classroom.

 

Simmons looks forward to doing more research on student learning and the role fear plays. “Fear affects how students learn in the classroom,” says Simmons. “It’s critical for students to free themselves from these fears and discover how their emotions play into their success.”

Along with Tammy Russell, director of institutional research/effectiveness, and Tonya Howden, assistant dean of students, the trio presented on “Learning Outcomes Using the SMART Approach,” and they have recently been asked to present on this topic at Mid-Michigan College.  More recently they presented at the Annual Higher Learning Commission Convention in Chicago on “Student Learning Outcomes in Student Services.”  “The presentation was about capturing student learning in co-curricular areas,” said Simmons. “This is vital to understanding the student experience at the institution.  In order for students to be successful, they must learn to navigate the college experience.  If students are prepared academically, but do not understand financial aid, college policies and procedures, or how to ask for help, they will not be successful.”

Is education in Simmons’ future? Perhaps. She has considered going back to school to broaden her teaching – possibly in theology. Simmons is currently in the process of becoming a woman religious with the Congregation of St. Joseph in Kalamazoo.  She is working with high school students to develop service projects within their communities. She recently led a group of high school students to host Healthfest, an event for children living in lower income levels in south Chicago.

Outside of the classroom, Simmons enjoys her nieces and nephews, taking walks in nature and she is an avid reader sometimes reading three to four books at a time.

Simmons is a member of the American Chemical Society and currently teaches Introduction to Chemistry, General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry at the college.

Glen Oaks Community College establishes Epsilon Pi Tau, honorary society for professions in technology; inducts 18 inaugural members

Glen Oaks Community College held its first ever induction ceremony, inducting 18 members into the newly established Delta Rho Chapter of Epsilon Pi Tau, the International Honor Society for Professions in Technology.

Epsilon Pi Tau is 81 years old and promotes excellence in academics, service, and research.

“As with all honor societies, EPT is dedicated to honoring high academic performance,” said Dr. David Devier, Glen Oaks president. “While the original development of EPT was focused on a somewhat narrow group of college programs, today the focus is on recognizing all programs and professions that utilize technology in their training and work.”

Devier feels that academic recognition for students in career programs is valuable and he has been instrumental in starting Epsilon Pi Tau chapters at each of his former institutions.

To commemorate the installation of the Delta Rho Chapter, a ceremonial oak tree was planted between the main entrance and the new student suites. As the chapter grows, the tree will as well in girth, height and roots.

Glen Oaks announces the promotion of Morgan Balcom to head coac

Morgan Balcom takes the reigns as the new head women’s basketball coach after Michael Mosley stepped down from the position in early February. Balcom has fielded the head coaching responsibilities in an interim role since that time and has held the ship steady during a trying time.
“Morgan has done an exceptional job since being put in a tough position in February. She has a wealth of knowledge being from the area, playing at Glen Oaks and transferring onto a four year institution. Her passion and energy are contagious and our athletes really respond to that. She will continue to do great things for us!” Courtney Ivan, Athletic Director, GOCC.

Balcom hails from Constantine where she was a standout multi-sport athlete. She continued on to Glen Oaks while playing basketball and softball for the Vikings and then to Iowa Wesleyan and competed in basketball for a year and then finished her bachelor degree in Elementary Education at Calumet College of St. Joseph where she played soccer for two years.
Balcom currently resides in Constantine where she was the assistant junior varsity basketball coach for two years previously.
“I’m extremely grateful and excited about this opportunity to help a program that I once played for. There is some work to be done, but I’m confident we’ll make progress as a program and make a mark in our league.” Morgan Balcom on being named the head coach. The Vikings can only go up as they only won 4 games over the past two seasons and have not won a conference game during that time.
The outlook for Glen Oaks women’s basketball is looking up as four players are returning from last year’s team and will add valuable experience that will go along well with a talented recruiting class. The Vikings have signed 7 new women so far and are still on the recruiting trail.

Glen Oaks board names new residence hall for the Deviers

The Glen Oaks Community College Board of Trustees voted unanimously at the April board meeting to name its new student housing residence: David H. and Patricia A. Devier Student Suites, in honor of President David Devier.

“This project is one that Dr. Devier conceived from the start in suggesting that we do the feasibility study, and to keeping us going down that route, including visiting other community college residence halls,” said Joni Smith, trustee. “I strongly feel that this building should be named after the Deviers, because without his vision, this facility would not be here today.”

Devier has been instrumental in the decision to construct student housing and has provided a generous gift of $16,000 for the design, construction and installation of the signage on the exterior/interior of the building.

The $6.5 million residence hall is scheduled for completion in August of this year in time for the start of the Fall 2017 semester and is being funded through a loan from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Frederick Construction, Inc., of Vicksburg, Mi., is the general contractor for the project. Glen Oaks is the first Michigan community college to utilize a USDA loan.

The three-story, 108-bed, student housing project plans include two- and four-suite units that share kitchen and living areas and two bathrooms. The facility is being constructed on the north side of the main parking lot, just west of the main building.

St. Joseph County Job Fair to host over 50 employers – Thurs., April 20

Over 50 area employers will participate in the largest job fair in St. Joseph County on Thursday, April 20, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Glen Oaks Community College. Those seeking jobs will have the opportunity to meet employer representatives to learn about and apply for positions that are currently open.

“Over 50 employers are registered for the event,” said Paul Aivars, director of business outreach and services for Glen Oaks Community College.  “Businesses participating in the Job Fair either have current openings or anticipate openings. Employers may be planning on filling one position or multiple positions which may be full-time or part-time, and they could be permanent, temporary and/or seasonal.”

The event is made possible through a partnership between Michigan Works Southwest!, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services and Glen Oaks Community College. It will take place in the Ken Schuler Court, the college’s gymnasium, at 62249 Shimmel Rd., in Centreville, Mich. The event is free and open to the public.

“This is a great opportunity for job seekers to connect with employers,” said Aivars. “The event is held each spring and affords employers the opportunity to meet qualified, talented and diverse applicants.”

Pre-Job Fair Workshop – Mon., Apr. 17
A Pre-Job Fair workshop will be held from 10 a.m. to noon on Monday, April 17 in the Dresser Business Development Auditorium on the Glen Oaks Campus to help job seekers prepare for the job fair. Participants will receive tips for navigating the event and advice on developing a sales pitch in addition to fine tuning their soft skills. The presenters are from Michigan Works Southwest!  Attendees will receive a $25 voucher for interview clothing.

A list of participating employers for the job fair can be found at: glenoaks.edu, under the Business and Industry/Job Fair tabs.

 

Glen Oaks’ PTK honor society inducts 52 new members

The Glen Oaks chapter of Phi Theta Kappa honor society inducted 52 new members Friday, March 31 at a ceremony inside the Nora Hagen Theatre. Professor of Business William “Bill” Furr was chosen and inducted as an honorary member of the organization based on his dedication to student success, his background in education and his involvement in many Glen Oaks’ functions.

This spring’s group of students was the largest group inducted into Glen Oaks’ chapter of Phi Theta Kappa since the organization’s first induction on campus in 1982. In recognition of being the chapter with the highest percentage of inducted PTK students in the state of Michigan, the chapter also received the REACH Award.

Of all students enrolled at GOCC, 24.27 percent of eligible students become members of Phi Theta Kappa. One hundred percent of Glen Oaks PTK members have either graduated or transferred to a four-year institution to complete their baccalaureate degrees.

Phi Theta Kappa is the largest international academic honor society for two-year colleges. Membership requires that a student maintain a 3.5 grade-point-average after at least 12 completed credit hours at the college. Members are exposed to scholarship opportunities and a success-driven environment with likeminded peers through this honor society.

Glen Oaks Selected to Participate in Loan Counseling Experiment

Glen Oaks is one of sixty colleges and universities in the nation to be selected to participate in the Loan Counseling Experiment under the U.S. Department of Education’s Experimental Sites Initiative (ESI).

The Loan Counseling Experiment will test the effectiveness of requiring additional loan counseling for student borrowers beyond the required entrance counseling for first-time borrowers and required exit counseling for all borrowers. The Loan Counseling Experiment will begin Fall 2017 and will continue each semester until the experiment is completed.

What does this mean for GOCC student borrowers?

If you completed Loan Entrance Counseling prior to Fall 2017 and are a returning direct loan borrower, you may be randomly assigned to a group who will be required to complete additional loan counseling as a condition of receiving your loan funds.  The additional loan counseling will entail completing the Department of Education Financial Awareness Counseling Tool (FACT) during a scheduled on-campus group session.

The GOCC Financial Aid Office will notify you at the time you submit your Direct Loan Request Form, and by U.S. Mail, if you have been assigned to complete additional loan counseling.

Please contact the GOCC Financial Aid Office at 269-294-4260 or financialaid@glenoaks.edu with any questions.

Public invited to experience distracted driving simulator at GOCC – Monday, Mar. 27; event designed to show dangers of text messaging

Driver distraction is one of the leading causes of motor vehicle accidents. One of the fastest growing and most problematic of driver distractions is text messaging. Accidents involving distracted driving are 100 percent preventable.

To help drive the message among students and the general public, the Glen Oaks Community College Campus Activity Board will host an Aware Txt/Distracted Driving Simulator on campus on Monday, Mar. 27 from noon to 6 p.m.

Students, faculty, staff and members of the community are encouraged to stop by and experience the Aware TXT simulator. Participants will learn the dangers of texting and driving and see consequences of their actions and how to make the right choices.

CEP, is a company that has taken on the challenge to warn of the dangers of texting. The firm is bringing its Aware TXT educational simulator experience to Glen Oaks to help shed light on the dangers of distracted driving.  Teens and young adults alike will have an opportunity to experience distracted driving scenarios in a real car utilizing a simulator to help in the education process.
The Aware TXT simulator has visited over 2700 college campuses, high schools and community events since 2007. The program has been nominated for multiple program awards and was awarded Program of the Year in 2012 from Campus Activities Magazine.

Certificate of General Studies

 

This certificate is designed to facilitate transfer from one institution to another under the Michigan Transfer Agreement. At least 30 credit hours of 100-200 level general education from the sending institution will be accepted as a block of at least 30 credit hours by the receiving institution. Students may complete the Michigan Transfer Agreement as part of an associate degree or as a certificate.

This 30-credit program, designed for students intending to pursue an associate degree from Glen Oaks Community College, documents the completion of general education requirements.

Program not eligible for federal financial aid

A certificate in General Studies is awarded to those who complete a minimum of 30 credit hours with a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course. A minimum of 15 credit hours must be earned at Glen Oaks.

 

Required Coursework (at least 30 hours)

Communications 

 ENG 121 English Composition I 3 credits
OR
 ENG 122 English Composition II 3 credits
 COM 110 Interpersonal Communication 3 credits
OR
 COM 150 Public Speaking 3 credits

Mathematics

 MATH 117 Finite Math 4 credits
OR
 MATH 151 College Algebra 4 credits
OR
 MATH 201 Statistics 3 credits

Humanities (2 courses, 2 different disciplines excluding studio and performance classes)

 ART 100 Art Appreciation  4 credits
 ART 220 History of Art I  4 credits
 ART 221 History of Art II  4 credits
 ENG 201 Women in Literature  4 credits
 ENG 233 Children’s Literature  4 credits
 HIST 101 Western Civilization I  4 credits
 HIST 102 Western Civilization II  4 credits
 HUM 101 Modern Culture & the Arts  4 credits
 HUM 234 World Mythologies  4 credits
 LNG 161 Spanish I  4 credits
 LNG 162 Spanish II  4 credits
 LNG 163 Spanish III  4 credits
 LNG 261 Spanish IV  4 credits
 MUS 150 Music Appreciation  4 credits
 PHIL 210 Ethics  4 credits
 PHIL 230 Philosophy  3 credits
 REL 231 Comparative Religion  4 credits
 REL 232 Old Testament  4 credits
 REL 233 New Testament  4 credits

Natural Sciences (2 courses, 2 different disciplines – 1 course with a lab)

 BIO 101 Human Biology 4 credits
 BIO 110 Biological Form & Function  3 credits
 BIO 120 Biology  4 credits
 BIO 121 General Biology I  4 credits
 BIO 122 General Biology II  4 credits
 BIO 125 Environment & Society  3 credits
 BIO 201 Ecology  4 credits
 BIO 210 Human Anatomy & Physiology I  4 credits
 BIO 211 Human Anatomy & Physiology II  4 credits
 BIO 212 Pathophysiology  4 credits
 BIO 220 General Genetics  3 credits
 BIO 230 Microbiology  4 credits
 CHEM 130 Chemistry  4 credits
 CHEM 133 General Chemistry I  4 credits
 CHEM 134 General Chemistry II  4 credits
 CHEM 210 Organic Chemistry I  4 credits
 GEOG 142 Physical Geography  4 credits
 GEOL 145 Physical Geology  4 credits
 MATH 104 Intermediate Algebra  4 credits
 MATH 117 Finite Mathematics  4 credits
 MATH 161 Calculus I & Geometry  4 credits
 MATH 162 Calculus II & Geometry  4 credits
 PHYS 144 Astronomy  4 credits
 PHYS 251 Physics I  4 credits
 PHYS 252 Physics Lab  1 credit
 PHYS 253 Physics II  4 credits
 PHYS 254 Physics II Lab  1 credit

Social Sciences (2 courses, 2 different disciplines)

 ECON 203 Principles of Economics – MICRO  4 credits
 ECON 204 Principles of Economics – MACRO  4 credits
 HIST 101 Western Civilization I  4 credits
 HIST 102 Western Civilization II  4 credits
 HIST 201 US History I  4 credits
 HIST 202 US History II  4 credits
 HIST 204 History of Michigan  4 credits
 PSI 110 American Government & Political Science  4 credits
 PSI 111 State & Local Government  4 credits
 PSY 101 Psychology  4 credits
 PSY 201 Psychology & Personality  3 credits
 PSY 210 Human Growth & Development  4 credits
 PSY 220 Abnormal Psychology  4 credits
 PSY 250 Human Sexuality  4 credits
 PSY 260 Social Psychology  4 credits
 SOC 120 Principles of Sociology  4 credits
 SOC 121 Modern Social Problems  4 credits
 SOC 220 Marriage & Family  4 credits
Total: 30 credits
 *Course has prerequisite(s)

 

Scope & Sequence

Fall 1 Winter 1 Fall 2 Winter 2
 ENG 121  NATURAL SCIENCE

 

Effective: Fall 2017
Current/Revised: 3/01/17

AGT 103 Fundamentals of Engines


3 Credits, 7 Contacts

Examines internal combustion engine fundamentals and diesel engine construction and maintenance. Studies the basics of gas and diesel engines including disassembly, measurement and assembly procedures. Troubleshooting is also covered.

Prerequisite: None

AGT 104 Vehicle/Equipment Electrical/Electronic Fundamentals


3 Credits, 5 Contacts

This course introduces electrical and electronic systems used on agricultural equipment, with an emphasis toward the theory, operation, and application. Also included will be the introduction to diagnostic principles and procedures as they apply to basic circuit types and predominate components utilized. Students will be expected to gain utilization skills as they apply to common testing tools and instruments. Students also will be expected to test for and measure voltages, current flow, and resistance; as well as identify and measure analog and digital signals.

Prerequisite: None

AGT 109 Heating, Venting & Air Conditioning Systems


2 Credits, 4 Contacts

Theory, service and repair of HVAC systems used on agricultural equipment are studied. Proper charging and recovery procedures are covered on both manual and automatic climate controlled systems. Safe handling of HVAC fluids and gases, as per EPA guidelines, as well as obtaining safe handling certification from either the Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) or Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) is included.

Prerequisite: None

AGT 110 Service Information Systems


2 Credits, 4 Contacts

The scope and purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with available electronic based proprietary information systems. Each student will become familiar with navigating and the application of equipment service information systems, parts systems, cellular and satellite systems. For purposes of diagnostics, repair, and service, each student using a PC will interface with various types of equipment.

Prerequisite: None

AGT 112 Seeding & Tillage Equipment


2 Credits, 4 Contacts

Service and adjustment of seeding equipment including drills and planters along with tillage equipment are covered in this course. Students will learn to set up the equipment in the diesel labs according to manufacturer guidelines and then make field adjustments, depending on soil conditions.

Prerequisite: None
Co-requisite: AGT 107

AGT 113 Hydraulic Systems


2 Credits, 4 Contacts

The second hydraulic course which introduces the student to variations of basic systems, schematics and more advanced testing and adjusting of mobile hydraulic systems. Students will gain hands on experience in components and equipment in the diesel laboratories.

Prerequisite: AGT 101

AGT 116 Combine Maintenance & Repair


3 Credits, 7 Contacts

The setup, service, repair and adjustment of modern combines including both corn and grain heads is covered in this course. Students will apply theories learned in the classroom to current production combines in the diesel labs and in the field.

Prerequisite: None
Co-requisite: AGT 107

AGT 119 Vehicle/Equipment Electrical/Electronic Systems Operation & Diagnostics


3 Credits, 7 Contacts

This course covers the electrical and electronic systems found on agricultural equipment. Systems covered include; power, starting, charging, cab/operator station controls, engine, power train, hydraulic, braking, steering, data network and related electronic control units. System operation, service, diagnosis and repair are included.

Prerequisite: AGT 104

AGT 122 Precision Farming Systems & Techniques


2 Credits, 4 Contacts

This course presents the essentials of modern precision fanning techniques. Function and application of precision farming components, equipment, satellite and cellular communications, OEM and/or aftermarket software systems and requirements, will be the focus of this course. System troubleshooting and diagnosis will be stressed throughout this course.

Prerequisite: AGT 104

AGT 125 Tractor Drivelines


2 Credits, 4 Contacts

Studies the maintenance and repair of various drivelines used on today’s highly technical agricultural equipment. Actual hands-on experience in adjustment, maintenance, set-up, servicing and operation of this equipment is offered. The importance of manufacturers’ shop manuals will be stressed for repair, set up and problem diagnosis.

Prerequisite: AGT 107

AGT 207 Advanced Hydraulics


2 Credits, 4 Contacts

Advanced hydraulic systems such as electro/hydraulic circuit operation and testing and complex valving are the focus of this classroom/lab course. Students will gain practical knowledge in the agricultural labs using modern equipment utilizing schematics and advanced troubleshooting techniques.

Prerequisite: AGT 101, AGT 104, AGT 113, and AGT 119

AGT 213 Diesel Engine Performance – Analysis & Tune Up


3 Credits, 5 Contacts

Students learn to adjust and tune diesel engines to meet factory specifications. Using both engine and chassis dynamometers and the required instrumentation, students diagnose performance complaints, troubleshoot and plot performance curves.

Prerequisite: AGT 103

AGT 216 Equipment Shop Project


4 Credits, 10 Contacts

Theory, service and repair of HVAC systems used on agricultural equipment are studied. Proper charging and recovery procedures are covered on both manual and automatic climate controlled systems. Safe handling of HVAC fluids and gases, as per EPA guidelines, as well as obtaining safe handling certification from either the Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) or Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) is included.

Prerequisite: AGT 101, AGT 103, AGT 104, AGT 107, AGT 109, AGT 110, AGT 112, AGT 113, AGT 116, AGT 119, AGT 122, AGT 125, AGT 207, AGT 213

Agricultural Equipment Technology Certificate

 

This certificate is designed to develop technically competent professional agricultural equipment service technicians. Students receive state-of-the-art technical education on the latest agricultural equipment through a combination of classroom instruction, hands-on laboratory instruction and supervised occupational work experience at a partnering dealership.

Agricultural Courses (minimum 38.43 credit hours required)

 AGT 101 Hydraulic Theory & Operation 2 credits
 AGT 103 Fundamentals of Engines  3 credits
 AGT 104 Vehicle/Equipment Electrical/Electronic Fundamentals  3 credits
 AGT 107 Preventive Maintenance & Service  2 credits
 AGT 109 Heating, Venting & Air Conditioning Systems  2 credits
 AGT 110 Service Information Systems  2 credits
 AGT 112 Seeding & Tillage Equipment  2 credits
 AGT 113 Hydraulic Systems*  2 credits
 AGT 116 Combine Maintenance & Repair  3 credits
 AGT 119 Vehicle/Equipment Electrical/Electronic Systems Operation & Diagnostics*  3 credits
 WELD 105 Basics of Welding  0.43 credits
 AGT 122 Precision Farming Systems & Techniques*  2 credits
 AGT 125 Tractor Drivelines*  2 credits
 AGT 207 Advanced Hydraulics*  2 credits
 AGT 213 Diesel Engine Performance – Analysis & Tune Up*  3 credits
 AGT 216 Equipment Shop Project*  4 credits

Elective

 AGT 219 Diesel Tech Field Experience I (Internship) 1 credits
 AGT 220 Diesel Tech Field Experience II (Internship)  2 credits
 AGT 221 Diesel Tech Field Experience III (Internship)  3 credits
Total: 38.43 – 40.43 credits
 *Course has a prerequisite

 

Scope & Sequence

Fall 1 Winter 1  Summer 1 Fall 2 Winter 2
 AGT 101  AGT 104  AGT 219  AGT 112  AGT 109
 AGT 103  AGT 113  AGT 125  AGT 122
 AGT 107  AGT 116  AGT 207  AGT 216
 AGT 110  WELD 105  AGT 213  AGT 219
 AGT 119  AGT 219  AGT 219
 AGT 219

Effective: Fall 2017
Current/Revised: 3/01/17

Associate of Applied Science in Agricultural Equipment Technology

 

This degree is designed to develop technically competent professional agricultural equipment service technicians. Students receive state-of-the-art technical education on the latest agricultural equipment through a combination of classroom instruction, hands-on laboratory instruction and supervised occupational work experience at a partnering dealership.

Communications (6 credit hours required)

 COM 110 Interpersonal Communication  3 credits
 ENG 121 English Composition I*  3 credits

Computer Science (4 credit hours required)

 CIS 101 Introduction to Computers & Software  4 credits

Business (6 credit hours required)

 BUS 104 Introduction to Business 3 credits
 BUS 251 Organizational Behavior 3 credits

Industrial Studies (3 credit hours required)

 INDS 151 Manufacturing Processes 3 credits

Mathematics (3 credit hours required)

 MATH 109 Math for Technicians I 3 credits

Agricultural Courses (38.43- 40.43 credit hours required)

 AGT 101 Hydraulic Theory & Operation 2 credits
 AGT 103 Fundamentals of Engines  3 credits
 AGT 104 Vehicle/Equipment Electrical/Electronic Fundamentals  3 credits
 AGT 107 Preventive Maintenance & Service  2 credits
 AGT 109 Heating, Venting & Air Conditioning Systems  2 credits
 AGT 110 Service Information Systems  2 credits
 AGT 112 Seeding & Tillage Equipment  2 credits
 AGT 113 Hydraulic Systems*  2 credits
 AGT 116 Combine Maintenance & Repair  3 credits
 AGT 119 Vehicle/Equipment Electrical/Electronic Systems Operation & Diagnostics*  3 credits
 WELD 105 Basics of Welding  0.43 credits
 AGT 122 Precision Farming Systems & Techniques*  2 credits
 AGT 125 Tractor Drivelines*  2 credits
 AGT 207 Advanced Hydraulics*  2 credits
 AGT 213 Diesel Engine Performance – Analysis & Tune Up*  3 credits
 AGT 216 Equipment Shop Project*  4 credits
 AGT 219 Diesel Tech Field Experience I (Internship)  1 credits
 AGT 220 Diesel Tech Field Experience II (Internship)  2 credits
 AGT 221 Diesel Tech Field Experience III (Internship)  3 credits
 Total:  60.43-62.43 Credits
 *Course has a prerequisite

Scope & Sequence

Fall 1 Winter 1 Summer 1 Fall 2 Winter 2
AGT 101 AGT 104 AGT 219/220/221 AGT 112 AGT 109
AGT 103 AGT 113 AGT 125 AGT 122
AGT 107 AGT 116 AGT 207 AGT 216
AGT 110 ENG 121 AGT 213 BUS 251
AGT 119 INDS 151 BUS 104 COM 110
CIS 101 WELD 105 MATH 109 AGT 219/220/221
AGT 219/220/221 AGT 219/220/221 AGT 219/220/221

Effective: Fall 2017
Current/Updated: 3/01/17

AGT 107 Preventive Maintenance & Service


2 Credits, 4 Contacts

Studies the maintenance and repair of various drivelines used on today’s highly technical agricultural equipment. Actual hands-on experience in adjustment, maintenance, set-up, servicing and operation of this equipment is offered. The importance of manufacturers’ shop manuals will be stressed for repair, set up and problem diagnosis.

Prerequisite: None

AGT 101 Hydraulic Theory & Operation


2 Credits, 4 Contacts

A study of hydraulic theory and the maintenance, repair, and methods of troubleshooting mobile hydraulic systems during lab experiences. Also covered in this class are cylinders, controls, pumps, and accessories of hydraulic equipment.

Prerequisite: None

Glen Oaks to host Fifth Annual Variety Show – Thurs., Mar. 23

Chords in the Community, the Glen Oaks Music Club, will host the fifth annual Variety Show on Thursday, Mar. 23 at 7 p.m. in the Nora Hagen Theatre on the campus of Glen Oaks Community College. The show is free and open to the public.

“There are mostly musical acts this year,” said Gerald Barkley, professor of math and advisor to Music Club. “A number of performances by the Music Club will highlight tunes from the musical — Rent.”

“We have a lot of talented students and employees at Glen Oaks,” said Barkley, and this event is a great opportunity to showcase those talents and provide inexpensive entertainment for the students and members of the community.”

Glen Oaks invites students, alumni, family, friends and members of the community to come out and enjoy the show.

Glen Oaks Community College is located at 62249 Shimmel Rd., Centreville, Michigan. Parking is free.

Glen Oaks seeks nominees for Distinguished Alumni, Fellows and E. J. Shaheen Teaching Excellence awards

Current and former Glen Oaks Community College students, staff and community members are invited to submit nominations for a number of awards presented annually at the college’s graduation ceremony on Friday, May 5. They are the Distinguished Alumni Award, the Fellows Award and the E. J. Shaheen Chair for Teaching Excellence Award.

The Distinguished Alumni Award is presented annually to alumni who are making a difference in their communities and who have remembered the college along the way. Annually, the college recognizes those who have completed at least 30 credit hours at the college or have earned associate degrees. Nominees have demonstrated achievement in their chosen professions, service to their communities, or outstanding contributions to the college.

The Fellows Award recognizes an individual(s) or institution(s) who has provided outstanding support of the college as evidenced by one or more of the following:

  • Long-term dedication and commitment to the College via a direct service on the Board of Trustees, Foundation Board, Advisory Committees, or other direct enga
  • Extensive community level support for the College in such rolls as K-12 leadership and collaboration, higher education partners/leaders and collaborations, service organizations leadership and collaboration, business/industry leadership and collaboration, community foundation leadership and collaboration or governmental leadership and collaboration.
  • . Direct and continuing support of the college and students via contributions to the GOCC Foundation or college including donations of equipment, software and expertise.
  • An individual who has provided long-term outward public support and/or direct service to the college. Former/retired employees may be consi

The E. J. Shaheen Chair for Teaching Excellence Award is presented to an outstanding faculty member who exemplifies high professional standards, demonstrates excellence in teaching and whose position as a faculty member reflects upon the value of education to his or her students and the quality of education. The appointment includes a monetary award. Nominees should:

  • Demonstrate a high professional standard both inside and outside the classroom.
    • Show expertise in course content; display creative thinking and innovative techniques in the learning environment.
    • Make the difficult learnable; be responsive to learning styles.
    • Express enthusiasm for learning; motivate students to learn and create an environment that is conducive to learning.
    • Have an excellent ability to convey knowledge to students; encourage lifelong learning and challenge students to think critically.
    • Care about how all are doing; appreciate diversity and make connections.

The E. J. Shaheen “Chair for Teaching Excellence” was initiated in 1984 after a generous donation by Mr. Eli J. Shaheen, an original member of the Glen Oaks Board of Trustees, to recognize dedicated teaching faculty at the College. Shaheen was a professor, lawyer and business owner who placed a high value on education. A great deal of his later life was spent promoting educational institutions that had been a part of his life or education. The library at Glen Oaks Community College is named in his honor.

Nomination forms including qualifications for all of the awards may be found at glenoaks.edu, under the About/Awards tab. Completed forms should be submitted to the President’s Office at Glen Oaks. Nominations will be accepted until 4 p.m. on Monday, Mar. 27, 2017.

Glen Oaks seeks nominations to fill board vacancy left by Mary Lou Falkenstein

Glen Oaks Community College is seeking nominations to fill a board of trustee vacancy left by the resignation of Mary Lou Falkenstein, who announced she will resign effective March 20.

The board thanked Falkenstein at the March board meeting for her service and dedicated a $500 leadership scholarship for a deserving Glen Oaks student over the 2017-18 school year as a “thank you” for her service.

Nominees should be a qualified and registered elector of the community college district. The person filling the seat will serve until the next scheduled election on November 20, 2018. At that time, the trustee would have the option to run for election to fill the remainder of the term which would be from 2018 to 2020. In 2020, the seat would be up for election for the “normal” six-year term length. Board meetings are held on the second Thursday of the month at 8 a.m. in the college boardroom.

Anyone interested in the seat would be appointed for the two-year portion of the vacated term right now. Candidates must express interest to the Glen Oaks president’s office by March 17 at 3 p.m.

The nomination committee will meet on March 20 to review the prospective candidates for consideration. The board will fill the seat by a majority vote the April 13 board meeting at which time the new member will complete the necessary paperwork and be sworn into office.

Glen Oaks invites you to “Spring into Wellness” a free event – Sat., March 18, featuring area wellness, nutrition and fitness experts

The newly formed Glen Oaks Community College Alumni and Friends Association is kicking off its first event and it is free and open to the community. “Spring into Wellness” will be held on Saturday, Mar. 18, from 9 a.m. to noon in the college’s D Wing and the Nora Hagen Theatre. The event will feature local experts on wellness, nutrition, fitness and more.  Parking is free.

Participants will have the option to attend four different 25-minute presentations beginning at 9 a.m. and running throughout the morning including the following:

  • “Foods That Make You Feel Good!” – presented by award-winning food columnist and author Laura Kurella, who will discuss, demonstrate and offer samplings of fun and fabulous ways that food can help you feel—and look—good!
  • “Salt, Sugar & Carbs – Oh My” – featuring Elizabeth Palmer, MA, RD, dietitian and Kelsey Townley, Three Rivers Health. Learn to understand how your body reacts to food.  Participants will learn about food sensitivities and realize what is important in reading food labels.
  • “Fitness for You” – a discussion by Jade Klingler, FNP, Colon Medical Clinic, will help you discover how to achieve your fitness goals and identify the fitness options right for you.
  • “Reiki, Herbs, Hypnotherapy & Acupuncture” – Representatives from Amber Myst Alternatives, Three Rivers, will share life-balancing techniques, including reiki, how to incorporate herbs into your life, hypnotherapy and laser acupuncture.
  • The feature presentation “Being Healthy is an Investment Worth Making!!” will be at 11:15 a.m. and will feature the duo Julianna Sauber, ND, CNHP, and Dr. Ashley Latva, DC., from Three Rivers Chiropractic and Wellness. The newly formed business provides a collection of holistic wellness practitioners under one roof.

 

“This isn’t a health fair,” said Pam Hughes, executive director of the Glen Oaks Foundation. “It’s much more – being a college, we wanted to be able to provide the participants with ‘mini-classes’ on wellness topics. We also wanted to do this in a way that incorporates experts from our own community,” said Hughes.

Participants will have the opportunity to win prizes including a Ninja Professional Blender, a Dunham Sports gift certificate and a 25-count membership to the Glen Oaks Fitness Center. Health snacks will be available along with other giveaways.

The Glen Oaks Alumni and Friends Association was formed last fall for people who share a common bond and appreciation for the college.

“We have had interest in moving ahead with activities for the association,” said Hughes. “We are looking forward to more events as we proceed, perhaps three to four events a year, some more social in nature while others may be more educational. As a community college, we define alumni as anyone who has taken one or more courses at the college.”

Glen Oaks to host MiCareerQuest for area ninth graders – Mar. 28; over 35 area businesses and organizations to participate in career exploration program

Glen Oaks Community College is proud to announce its participation in MiCareerQuest Southwest St. Joseph County to be held on Tuesday, Mar. 28 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. On this day over 750 ninth-graders in St. Joseph County will spend the day learning about a variety of different career options from area employers.

Local employers will engage the students in hands-on activities to help them identify a wide range of career options.

“We are excited to be a part of MiCareerQuest SW SJC,” said Paul Aivars, director of business outreach and services at Glen Oaks, who is the team leader for this event. “Students will visit six different career pathways throughout the morning to help guide them to their desired career path. The students are encouraged to ask questions of employers, participate in activities and while learning about occupations.”

The six pathways for students to explore are: Arts and Communications; Health Care and the Sciences, Business, Manufacturing and Technology, Trades, Agriculture and the last area is a general High School Options information area – there the students will learn about the different routes available to get them started on the right track to their desired career-choice pathway.

“We have both small and large businesses participating in the program,” said Aivars, “including local plastics and molding manufacturers, local hospitals and nursing homes, police and fire departments, as well as many of our own academic departments including welding, auto, art, science, nursing and health programs just to name a few.

Volunteer Opportunities
“A program of this magnitude requires a large number of volunteers to successfully run the event,” said Aivars. “We have members of the college faculty and staff onboard and know that many more will be needed.” Volunteers in the community interested in helping out with this event must be available from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Tuesday, Mar. 28, and should contact Sarah Bartley, Glen Oaks admissions, at sbartley@glenoaks.edu or by phone (269) 294-4246.

MiCareerQuest™ was created in 2015 by Michigan Works! Kent, Allegan & Barry Counties (now West Michigan Works!), Kent ISD and the Construction Workforce Development Alliance (CWDA) in response to employers’ need for future talent in Construction, Healthcare, Information Technology and Manufacturing.

Glen Oaks Community College Awarded National Soft Skills Training Scholarship

Wonderlic, Inc. has announced that the Department of Business Outreach and Services and the Department of Academics at Glen Oaks Community College (GOCC), Centreville, MI, were selected from a pool of 120 applicants as one of the five recipients of the Wonderlic Soft Skills Training Bootcamp Scholarship.

The Department of Academics will incorporate the soft skills program into its College and Life Strategies Course for General Education majors. The Department of Business Outreach and Services sponsors the Coop Career Bootcamp, which serves 100 unemployed and underemployed people in St. Joseph County, helping them to attain the skills they need and guide them through the first months of their new jobs. The Coop will use part of the Scholarship to help increase the resources used to train these diverse adult learners in the soft skills local employers need.

Paul Aivars, Director of Business Outreach and Services at GOCC, understands the local job market. “We have a great need in our county to assist our employers in providing a pool of applicants that have the soft skills they are looking for.”

As part of the Bootcamp, learners will be pretested before training begins and then tested afterwards to measure improvement. Therefore, the application required Glen Oaks to explain how the Soft Skills Training Bootcamp would be integrated into their existing curriculum so that participants were sure to have a meaningful and valuable learning experience.

GOCC plans to incorporate the Soft Skills Training Bootcamp into the classroom as a guided instructional component, so that students can get the immediate assistance they need to complete the lessons. Business Outreach and Services provides guidance for participants throughout their coursework and in their job search after completing the program. Each participant is assigned a coach who follows their progress during school and for up to a year after completion.

The Soft Skills Training Bootcamp is competency-based program that provides online and self-paced training with interactive learning experiences to improve soft skills in ten major areas. After completing the training curriculum, participants will have the opportunity to take an assessment to qualify for digital badges, which can be used to demonstrate their competency in each skill.

The Wonderlic Soft Skills Training Bootcamp modules include:
1.    Interpersonal Skills
2.    Communication Skills
3.    Listening and Nonverbal Communication
4.    Self-Management Skills
5.    Problem Solving
6.    Initiative
7.    Critical Thinking
8.    Professionalism
9.    Teamwork
10.    Cultural Sensitivity

To find out more about the Wonderlic Soft Skills Training Bootcamp, contact Wonderlic’s Competency-Based Solutions Team.

To find out more about the program, contact Paul Aivars, Director of Business Outreach and Services, at 269-294-4276, or click here for more information.

Wonderlic, Inc. is a privately held company headquartered in Vernon Hills, IL and a founding member of the Association of Test Publishers. The company provides businesses and schools with a comprehensive library of highly regarded assessments and surveys for each phase of the hiring and student selection process. In its 75+ year history, Wonderlic has delivered over 300 million assessments and surveys to more than 60,000 organizations, government agencies, and accrediting bodies. http://www.wonderlic.com

Glen Oaks is Making a Difference

As we proceed into the New Year at Glen Oaks there is much to be excited about.  Most county residents know that the college now enrolls significant numbers of high school students via Dual Enrollment and Early Middle College. With this being the case, we can ask if these efforts are making a difference in the college attendance of these students.

To answer this question we have reviewed the data associated with the past four years’ Dual Enrollment statistics. During these years the number of Dual Enrollment seniors graduating totals 1,007.  The following table reports these data for each year’s high school graduates who attend higher education within twelve months following graduation.

Graduation Year # of Graduates Enrolled Not Enrolled
2012-13 232 76.7% 23.3%
2013-14 198 78.3% 21.7%
2014-15 278 79.9% 20.1%
2015-16* 299 74.2% 25.8%
Overall 1007 77.2% 22.8%

*2015-2016 graduates have not had twelve months since graduation.

The following table reports these data for each year’s graduates since their high school graduation one year and beyond.

Graduation Year # of Graduates Enrolled Not Enrolled
2012-13 232 81.5% 18.5%
2013-14 198 82.3% 17.7%
2014-15 278 83.1% 16.9%
2015-16* 299 74.2% 25.8%
Overall 1007 79.9% 20.1%

*2015-2016 graduates have not had twelve months since graduation.

These data are exceptional in reporting nearly 80 percent of the St. Joseph County students who were Dual Enrolled over the past four years attended college.  With a historical percentage of college attendance in the county being approximately 50 percent, these findings of higher college attendance are very encouraging.  Data from each of St. Joseph County schools varies school to school but all show this strong higher education attendance.

Career Technical Education (CTE) students are also Dual Enrolled in Glen Oaks Community College courses.  While these students historically did not attend post-secondary education, the college attendance rate for the Dual Enrolled CTE students over the same four graduation years is approximately 50 percent, 87 of 174.  When the CTE Dual Enrollment students are separated from the total (1007-174=833) the non-CTE college attendance rate over the same four years is 86 percent.

Of interest is the variety of programs and institutions these students have selected over the most recent four years. Dual Enrollment is also encouraging CTE students to pursue education beyond high school. Of course Glen Oaks Community College is the institution most often selected for attendance but only 20 percent of the time. More than 100 other institutions from all over the country have been selected for attendance. To name just a few of these institutions they include Western Michigan University at 85, Kalamazoo Valley Community College at 62, Southwestern Michigan College at 50, Michigan State University at 40, Grand Valley State University at 36, Central Michigan University at 29, and the University of Michigan at 24. It is very rewarding for our K-12 partners and our faculty and staff to know that together we are helping students pursue their goals.

In closing, the data reported here truly reveal the impact Dual Enrollment is having on St. Joseph County high school students.  These students will surely add value to their lives and have more opportunities for employment and higher earning power.  Please encourage these students as you have the opportunity.  Every student needs support and engagement and together our county schools, Glen Oaks Community College and community will help raise the economy and standard of living.  Our employers will also gain employees with job ready skills.  This suggests the far too often used “Win-Win-Win” saying — but in this case, it holds true as students, employers and communities all benefit.

Dr. David Devier
President, Glen Oaks Community College

 

 

New Glen Oaks Viking Speaker Series to feature: Rahaf Khatib, the first hijabi runner featured on cover of a fitness magazine in the US

Glen Oaks Community College will host Rahaf Khatib, the first hijabi runner prominently featured on the cover of a fitness, nutrition and lifestyle magazine in the United States on Monday, Mar. 6 at noon in the Nora Hagen Theatre.  Khatib is a six-time marathon runner who is currently training to run in the Boston Marathon this April.

Khatib was born in Damascus, Syria, and immigrated to the United States in the 1980s with her parents.  Today, she is an American citizen and resident of Farmington Hills, Michigan, who has a mission to inspire other Muslim women to get active.

The College Council at Glen Oaks recently made a decision to reinstate a speaker series program.

“We are re-starting what will now be known as the Viking Speakers Series,” said Tracy Labadie, assistant dean of assessment and academic services.  “We are honored that Rahaf has agreed to be our first speaker and look forward to her visit. We hope to offer a broad range of topics and bring in diverse speakers throughout the series.”

This event will is free and open to all faculty, staff, students and community members.

Strang, Engle and Miller—to be inducted into Glen Oaks Athletic Hall of Fame, ceremony to take place Sat., Feb. 18, in new Ken Schuler Court

Glen Oaks Community College will induct three new members into this year’s Athletic Hall of Fame. Erin Strang, of Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, Larry Engle and Mike Miller both of Colon, Michigan, will be honored at the third annual Athletic Hall of Fame game on Saturday, Feb. 18 at the college. The ceremony will take place in the newly named Ken Schuler Court at approximately 2:30 p.m. between the Viking Men’s and Women’s basketball games versus the Muskegon Jayhawks.

“We have a great class of inductees in this year’s hall of fame,” said Courtney Ivan, GOCC’s athletic director. “Mike and Larry have been fixtures in this gym on game days for over 30 years. It is a testament of how much they value the college to come back year after year and serve this campus and community. They have had the pleasure of watching so many student athletes over the years and have seen their struggles and triumphs.

“Erin was a model student athlete,” said Ivan. “She excelled in the classroom and on the court so much that she was able to continue her athletic career at Lake Superior State University. We hope so

much for our students to follow that path if that is their desire. Erin continues to excel in her professional career and it is amazing to know that Glen Oaks was the start of that foundation. Her story is one I like to tell athlete’s about when they come to visit campus,” said Ivan.

Strang played two years of volleyball at Glen Oaks where she received her Associate of General Studies degree in 2000. She transferred to Lake Superior State University where she continued to play volleyball and graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration. Today, she is president and CEO of the Central Michigan University Research Corporation, a business incubator and accelerator within the Mount Pleasant SmartZone that provides guidance and support for businesses.

Engle has worked the basketball scorer’s table at Glen Oaks for the past 32 years. He was a member of the first men’s basketball team at Glen Oaks and was in the first graduating class of the college, receiving his Associate of Arts degree in 1969. He graduated from Western Michigan University in 1971. Larry taught and coached at Colon High School for 37 years – coaching baseball, basketball, golf and track. He was selected five times as “Regional Coach of the Year” and was chosen by the Associated Press as Michigan Coach of the Year for Basketball in 1985. He was inducted into the Colon Athletic Hall of Fame in 2003.

Miller has worked the basketball scorer’s table at Glen Oaks for the past 22 years.  Miller worked as general manager for 44 years at the Abbott Magic Company in Colon, a company which specializes in special effects and illusions for all types of shows across the nation. He also coached 7/8th grade basketball in Colon. His hobbies include magic, collecting music CD’s and Viking basketball.

2017-18 Glen Oaks Community College Foundation Scholarship application now available

The Glen Oaks Community College Foundation is accepting scholarship applications from new and returning Glen Oaks students for the 2017-18 academic year.

Through philanthropic efforts of the Foundation, charitable cash gifts have provided many students the opportunity of an education that will in turn help change their lives in a positive way.

“Last year, 40 students received over $71,815 in scholarships,” said Pam Hughes, executive director of the Glen Oaks Community College Foundation. “Additionally, the athletic program received a $35,000 grant to award scholarships to student athletes who are participating on one or more of the Viking sports teams. Students can use the award money for education related expenses. Selection of the recipients is based on academic ability, financial circumstances and career goals.”

Two recent recipients of the Freiburger-Keller Families Scholarship are Morgan Czajkowski and Megan Martin “Because of this scholarship, I am able to attend college and pay for my textbooks, and I am so grateful,” said Czajkowski. Martin shares the same sentiments. “I am very thankful to have received this scholarship, it has helped me greatly with the cost of college for my first year,” said Martin. “I hope to receive my degree in nursing.”

The GOCC Foundation Scholarship application is on the Glen Oaks website at:  https://www.glenoaks.edu/student-services/financial-aid/scholarships/, and is listed under Currently Open Scholarships. Scholarship applications with all required materials must be submitted by 4 p.m., Friday, Feb. 24, 2017.

Contact the GOCC Financial Aid Office with questions by calling (269) 294-4260. Office hours are 8:15 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday, Thursday and Friday, and 8:15 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday.

To browse the available scholarships, visit the link listed above. Persons wishing to learn more about establishing a scholarship fund or contributing to an existing fund, should contact Hughes at (269) 294-4384.

Glen Oaks announces Fall 2016 scholars

Glen Oaks Community College announces its outstanding scholars for the Fall 2016 Semester. Students on the President’s Honor Roll achieved a grade point average of 3.75-4.0. Students on the Dean’s Honor Roll achieved a grade point average of 3.5-3.74. The students are listed alphabetically according to their towns of residency.

President’s Honor Roll

Michigan Residents

Bronson: Kaitlyn Czajkowski, Eion Depaz, Brandi Fox, Adyson Lasky, Kiana Mayer, Clare Mayes, Jocelyn McMichael, Chaselyn Preston, Jillian Pyles, Morgan Rose, Gracelynn Shortridge, Allison Sikorski, Chase Thrams, Brooklynn Zellner

Burlington: Baylie Harvey

Burr Oak: Lori Frederick, Connor Swihart, Stephanie Torres-Murguia

Centreville: Andrea Bell, Nicole Booker, Kayla Brown, Nicole Elkins, Alexis Grostick, Kayla Jepsen, Kristal Keith, Jonah Kirby, Graham Morrison, Tyler Sheteron, Kalotina Spanos, Courtney Stauffer, Samantha Wells

Coldwater:  Brendan Behnke, Lucas Disbro, Brittany Gray, Bryce Kosmerick, Karah Rissman

Colon: Dillon Baker, Morgan Czajkowski, Bailey Fisher, Kaely Hahn, Kennedy Hawkins, Rachel Jensen, Jenafer Lance, Nicholas Martin, Megan Martin, Camille McKenzie, Madison Miller, Rebecca Shuler, Emily Vendal, Brianna Vinson, Garrick Yaudes

Constantine: Betina Dingess, Rachel Dingess, Nathaniel Gonder, Meagan Herlein, Malorie Hulse, Sydney Pedersen, Tina Pusateri, Chelsea Schoetzow, Roopa Singh, Amanda Wright

Jones: Haley Frizzell, Brian Hutchinson

Kalamazoo: Robert Murangira, Modeste Mukaneza

Marcellus: Rheanna Graver, Ashley Ives

Mendon: Patrick Beebe, Cole Burpee, Kendra Classen, Wyatt Cool, Mihret Craft, Emma Eberstein, Morgan Eckert, Blake Everson, Sydney Griffith, Connor Henckel, Ashley Kuhlman, Alexis Leighton, Olivia Leighton, Mary Leighton, Emily Loudenslager, Danielle Parsons, Meagon Persing, Cassandra Plummer, Hannah Rice, Garrett Russell, Angela Smith, Lara Speece, Arjun Vorster

Nottawa: Alexis Bennett, Joshua Wright

Portage: Andrew Johnson

Quincy: Michael Thompson

Sturgis: Meaghan Anderson, Lenore   Borden, Mikayla Botti, Paola Camacho, Madison Campbell, Arendine Cardiel, Alycia Carpenter, Taylor Clark, Sarah Cline Kaylynn Cline, Lisa      Cripe, Michael De Young, Michelle Deam, Timothy Freehling, Leslie Gamez, Lizeth Garcia, Jeremy Gooch, Megan   Hackenberg, Allison Herman, Larry Hiemstra, Ashlee Holtz, Sarah  Howk, Naomi Julien, Lauren  Kane, Anthony Kuhbander, Hope Lee, Mitchell Manduzzi, Mark Meek, Daniel Monahan, Olivia Morris-Blond, Rebecca Mulkey, William Murphy, Maria Nieves, Monica Picker, Marisa Redmond, Amanda Ritchie, Noah Roberts, Linda Rutter, Elisha Schultz, Kassandra Schwartz, Amber  Summey, Cassaundra Weiderman, Edna Yoder

Three Rivers: Alyssa Arrington, Rachael Arrington, Steven Bartolameolli, Claire Bernhardt, Taylor Batten, JayCe Bingaman, Kegan Binkley, Samantha Bruley, Amber Chapman, Rex Crotser, Christopher Dao, Audrey Fenwick, Hannah Frye, Pamella Frye, Kenneth Gilson, Evan Griffioen, Megan Happel, Aaron Hassinger, Michael Hayes, Olivia Judsen, Caitlynn Loker, John Londono, Alison Lorenz, Caitlyn McDowell, Collin Meyer, Tiffany Miller, Meryn Mostrom, Stephen Murphy, Matthew Paavola, Taylor Schmidt, Paige Schoon, Roy Stafford, Julia Sutter, Keyona Thompson, Dylan Tuft, Victoria Wheeler, Zoey Willson

Vicksburg:
Jennifer Feasel

White Pigeon: Baylee Bacheller, Hannah Carr, Brett Cropsey, Kathrina Hagner, Brittany Harman, Elizabeth Lane, Desiree Rachwal, Zane Shoppell

Indiana Residents:

Howe: Nathaniel Denton

LaGrange:  Britany Bills

Shipshewana:  Lauren Lamb

 

Deans Honor Roll 

Michigan Residents

Burlington: Taylor Vrooman

Burr Oak: Caleb Frohriep, Tiffany Middaugh

Centreville: Dustin  Bovee, Jackie Brandys, Rebecca Clementz, Robert Frederick, Kathryn Gage, Keyara Long, Joshua Schwartz, Abby Sheteron

Coldwater:  Desirae Case, Chase  Gibson, Joshua Lee, Mercedes Locklin

Colon: Gianna  Eagle, Caitlyn Grindel, McKenzie Gruner, Kayla Haskin, Brooke Kubasiak, Andrew Lash, Coni Nickles, Kelsey Schultz, Christel Schwartz, Mariah Seiber, Blake Spillers

Constantine: Ashley Foura, Hannah Fries, Jessika Gay, Leeann Hurst, Jahcub Mullendore, Jasmine Page, Trasandra Ragsdale

Edwardsburg: Ashley Harkless

Jones: Havin McKay

Lawrence: Erica Vrhel

Leondias: Zachary Greenwald, Sky Truckey

Marcellus: Allison  Ives

Mendon: Nikolas Andaverde, Wyatt Cupp, Samantha Fess, Jacob Hagenbuch, Cody Kline, Megann Leighton, Jordan Medich, Makenzie Oatley, Courtney Ridenour, Brooke Vanzoest

Portage: Devin Dumont, Aaron Goretski

Sherwood: Jhenna Puckett, Abigail Stoll, Megan Watson

Sturgis: Madeline Adams, Karla Arvizo, Kyle  Bueno, Miranda Bystry, Arianna Clemens, Karla Costilla Urbina, Kimberly Davis, Vanessa Delgado, Ramiro   Flores, Brooke Flower, Summer Grimes, Dalia Hernandez, Ammara Kanjanayothee, Ethan Long, Susana Luna-Perez, Ashley Milliman, Gerardo Ortega, Samantha Prestidge, Katrina Rigby, Haley Robbins, Viviana Rubio, Anna Rueppel, Diana Sanchez, Katlyn Taylor, Renee Taylor, Ann Ware, Sarah Warner, Drew Wiley

Tekonsha:  Alexis Liskovec

Three Rivers: Paul Baldwin, Paula Beehler, MacKenzie Deel, Aleesa Gatton, Zachary Gatton, Felisha  Hodges, Christian Howard, MacKenzie Johnson, SherRon Jones, Amy Kemp, Rebecca Lorenz, Hannah Orzol, Todd Parker, Jacob Prowett, Camryn Rhodes, Amber Speece, Tiana Sternbergh, Blaine Stowe, Matthew Velez, Emily Whitehead, Megan Zinsmaster

Union City: Rachel Lipscomb, Abigail McKinnon

Vandalia: Samantha Mohney

White Pigeon: Carly Corder, Bruce Heslet, Jonathan Knautz, Kloe Pettit, Carla Tullos

Indiana Residents:

Elkhart:  Cynthia Bunnell

Howe: Madeleine Young

Milford: Aimee  Trammell

Shipshewana:  Wanda Daniels

 

 

 

 

Application open for 2017-18 Presidential and Dean Scholarships at Glen Oaks Community College

Glen Oaks Community College is now accepting applications for the Presidential and Dean Scholarships for the 2017-2018 academic year.

To be eligible for these scholarships students must be a 2017 graduate from a high school in St. Joseph County or within the Glen Oaks service area (Cass County residents attending Three Rivers, Constantine or White Pigeon High Schools; students attending high schools in Branch County in Michigan; and students attending high schools in LaGrange, Elkhart and Steuben Counties of Indiana).

For the Presidential Scholarship students must have a minimum GPA of 3.5 to be eligible for this $4,000 per year award. For the Dean Scholarship, worth $2,000 per year, students must have a minimum GPA of 3.0.  Students must meet the minimum GPA requirement after the first semester of their senior year.  Both scholarships may be renewable for one year.

“A Glen Oaks Presidential Scholarship will be awarded to one student from each of the eight high schools in St. Joseph County, and two additional scholarships will be awarded to students residing in the Glen Oaks Service Area,” said Jean Zimmerman, director of financial aid and scholarships. “For the Dean’s Scholarship, we will award two per each high school in the county, plus two scholarships to students residing in the Glen Oaks service area.”

To access the scholarship descriptions and application do one of the following:

1) Go to glenoaks.edu/student services/financial aid/Types of Aid and select Scholarships from the list on the left. The scholarship descriptions and application are listed under Currently Open Scholarships.

2) To have the scholarship descriptions and application mailed, faxed, or emailed to you please contact the Glen Oaks Financial Aid Office at (269) 294-4260 or financialaid@glenoaks.edu.

To be considered for these awards, all application materials must be received in the Glen Oaks Financial Aid Office by 4 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 17.

Glen Oaks photo exhibit “Bold and Unadorned” celebrates Latvian architect Gunnar Birkerts and Glen Oaks architecture; “Greet and Learn” to be held Wed., Jan 25

Today, construction crews are working on a student housing project on the campus of Glen Oaks Community College, but it was 50 years ago that construction began on the campuses main building, under the direction of Latvian architect Gunnar Birkerts.

To celebrate the 50 years of the main building, Dr. Irene Elksnis-Geisler, director of the colleges tutoring and testing center, has photographed the building to depict the boldness in the college’s architecture. The photos are on exhibit in the E. J. Shaheen Library.

Students, faculty and staff are invited to a “Greet and Learn” session on Wednesday, Jan. 25 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the library to view the exhibit and enjoy a Latvian cake and learn about Latvian architecture and culture.“

“Modern Latvian architecture melds traditional Latvian culture with post-modernism. Birkerts work has been described as bold and unadorned” said Elksnis-Geisler, who herself is of Latvian heritage. “This is about history, and how we fit into the history of this community as we talk about moving into the next stage — a modern day look and feel for the college.”

Gunnar Birkets was born and raised in Latvia during the country’s brief period of independence. He fled Latvia due to the advancing Russian army toward the end of the Second World War. Latvia’s symbols, folklore and literature have shaped his artistic voice. For him, cultural heritage was even more precious because of the loss of Latvia’s independence. His latest work is the National Library of Latvia, home of Latvia’s wisdom and learning, the eminent Castle of Light, inspired by Latvian folklore, which hosted the headquarters of the Latvian Presidency in the Council of the European Union in 2015, and the reception for Vice President Biden in 2016.

 

Glen Oaks holds county-wide Summit on Dual Enrollment and Early Middle College

Over 50 school administrators from St. Joseph County public schools and Glen Oaks Community College met at Glen Oaks on Thursday, Jan. 19 for what is likely to be the first semi-annual High School Dual Enrollment/Early Middle College Summit.

Glen Oaks President David Devier kicked off the event reporting that 48 percent, or 549 students enrolled at the college last fall were high school age. “We are one of the few colleges in Michigan reporting increased enrollments,” said Devier. “Glen Oaks is on the cutting edge of a trend with the increases coming from high school age students looking to take advantage of college courses at the state’s expense whether it be in the form of Career and Technical Education, Dual Enrollment or the Early Middle College programs.”

“Glen Oaks is now serving 10 different schools with the addition of Bronson Schools and Pansophia Academy in Coldwater, Michigan, who are both planning to launch the Early Middle College program this fall,” said Devier. “The purpose of this event is to gather the partnering parties together to share what’s working well and what processes could be improved.”

Stacie Hart, student services cashier, and Chuck Frisbie, director of institutional innovation, led discussions surrounding financial responsibilities. Costs of the programs vary depending on whether qualified high school teachers teach the subject versus a Glen Oaks faculty member.  Schools are allotted a dollar amount per pupil to go toward these programs, however, if a student fails a course, different schools have different models that apply.

Dr. Patricia Morgenstern, dean of academics at Glen Oaks, said that the college now has a year-long schedule and is working to meet the needs of the high school students. “Our goal would be to have the high schools project and make course requests early in the year to help direct and guide the year-long schedule. This helps in planning faculty and room assignments for courses.”

There was a general consensus that Glen Oaks faculty were to be commended on adjusting their schedules to meet the different high school semester dates that aren’t always synched with dates at the college. “For example, Glen Oaks was closed in observance of the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday, but opened its doors to CTE students so they could get their classes, since the high schools were open,” said Morgenstern.

Anita Schlabach, Early Middle College director, provided an overview of the new program. “We now have 67 students in the EMC program,” said Schlabach. “Our first pilot cohort (13 students) will be graduating with their high school class this spring. These students will be coming to Glen Oaks in the fall to finish their prescribed programs at the expense of the state.” Discussions were held on better preparing the EMC students for college through the Student Success course at the onset of the program rather than in their junior or senior years. Also discussions were held on how to best integrate the math courses that are required in the program.

Tonya Howden, assistant dean of students, led discussions regarding discipline policies and how they are handled on campus versus at the high schools and Lyle Raven, director of advising, discussed the Michigan Transfer Agreement and transfer advising, as well as accommodations for students with disabilities.

 

Glen Oaks invites public to travel to Paris and the Chateaux for the annual study abroad trip

Students and members of the Glen Oaks Community College faculty and staff will be traveling abroad to Paris, France, as part of this year’s study abroad program and the public is invited to join them.

“Each year the college offers a study abroad trip,” said Michael Northrop, coordinator of the program at the college. “Last year, we visited the British Isles and some of the more recent study abroad travels have included Ireland, China, Costa Rica and Italy.”

The nine-day Paris and Chateaux trip will run May 15 to May 23, 2017, and will begin in Paris where it will include sights such as the Notre Dame Cathedral, Champs-Elysees, Arc de Triomphe, Eiffel Tower and the Louvre.

Outside of Paris, the group will visit the Loire Valley to enjoy architecture of the Chartres Cathedral, the Chateau de Chambord, a chateaux built by King Francis, the Chenonceau, a chateaux that bridges over the Cher River and finally the majestic gardens of Amboise.

Visitors will travel across a causeway to the one-of-a-kind Mont St. Michel, an abbey perched on granite, an attraction that has drawn visitors for more than a thousand years and can only be accessed through low tide.

Before heading home, the group will visit Normandy, where Allied troops landed on the beaches in 1944, launching the campaign that eventually liberated mainland Europe from the Nazis.

For more information or to register, go to EFCST.COM/1852124SZ, or contact Professor Northrop at mnorthrop @glenoaks.edu.

Glen Oaks announces upcoming business offerings, also available for public: Project Management, Communications and Work Skills Success

Glen Oaks Community College has announced its Business and Industry course offerings for the first quarter. These courses are open to the public and available to businesses for employee development and training.

“In response to the requests of area businesses, we are offering a Work Skills: Steps to Success series, to help employees gain the basics in communications,” said Paul Aivars, director of business outreach and services. “The two-hour format, is often preferred by employers to help maintain plant productivity.”

“In addition, we are offering the higher demand courses that focus on project management skills and communications,” said Aivars.

Upcoming offerings include:

WorkSkills: Steps to Your Success Series – Jan. 31, Feb. 9 and Mar. 9
This series from AchieveGlobal is a basic introductory course featuring modules in What it Takes to Succeed: The Basic Principles; Positive Responses to Change, and Helping Your Team Work.

Intro to Project Management – Feb. 13 & 14
This two-day workshop teaches the mechanics of effective project management, how to get people onboard, better utilize their skills and achieve successful results. Participants can expect to be fully engaged while learning and applying a step-by-step approach to help reduce the risk and uncertainty associated with project completion.

Advanced Project Management – Feb. 16 & 17
Advanced Project Management is a two-day activity-based training course that goes beyond the basics to increase the participants’ understanding of how to select and prioritize projects, define customer needs and ensure no tasks are left behind. Participants will learn how to prevent dependencies from negatively affecting the project schedule and establish a performance measurement baseline. The will learn how to make strategic decisions to avoid delays, disruptions and extra work, and expedite the organization’s goals.

Communications – Mar. 23
Individual and team success depends upon the ability of individuals to communicate with each other. This practical 8-hour course helps participants understand the essentials of the communication process, identify communication problems, discuss productive approaches to communication and to develop effective communication skills. These skills will provide a great benefit for any organization’s employees.

For further information on these and other offerings, go to glenoaks.edu, and click on the Business and Industry tab to reach the Customized Training page, or contact Paul Aivars at the college at (269) 294-4276, or through email at paivars @glenoaks.edu.

Glen Oaks Community College to hold “Day of Celebration” – Wed., Dec. 14 — groundbreaking for housing project; recognition for outgoing board members

Glen Oaks Community College will hold a special “Day of Celebration” on Wednesday, Dec. 14. Following the 8 a.m. Board of Trustee’s meeting, there will be a reception honoring retiring board members Dave Allen and Jim Moshier. At 11 a.m. there will be a groundbreaking ceremony and reception for the new student housing project in the Dresser Business Development Center. The public is invited to attend these events.

“Dave Allen has served on the board for 9 years, and Jim Mosier has served for 19 years,” said Dr. David Devier, Glen Oaks president. “We thank them for all their dedication to Glen Oaks and hope that they will stay in touch with the college.”

“We invite the community to join us as we turn over the earth with celebratory shovels and listen to invited speakers and guests, both at the local, state and federal levels, share how this project will impact the college and the community,” said Devier.

Design and construction for the housing project was approved by the board in April and Frederick Construction, Inc., was selected as the general contractor at a special November 30 board meeting.

The $6.5 million project, is scheduled for completion in the fall of 2017, and is funded through a low-cost (2.38 percent) USDA Rural Development federal 30-year loan. Glen Oaks will be the first Michigan community college to utilize a USDA loan.

The three-story, 108-bed student housing project plans include two- and four-suite units that share kitchen and living areas and two bathrooms. The facility will be located on the north side of the main parking lot, just west of the main building.

Glen Oaks Community College is at 62249 Shimmel Rd., in Centreville, Michigan.

CTE graphic design students participate in panel review

Four graphic design students in the advanced Career and Technical Education (CTE) Graphic Design cohort and a panel of three outside judges participated in a branding and advertising design review in late November at Glen Oaks Community College. The basis of the review was a fictitious company developed by each student with their corresponding logo design, print materials, design spec sheets and website homepage mock-ups. They presented their work during a “shark tank” like event. Many students commented that it was a stressful, yet beneficial experience for them moving forward into higher education and future careers. Pictured from left are judges: Val Juergens, Eric Connelly and Joey Hamilton with graphic design student Chloe Cornwell.

Board approves contractor bid for student housing construction project; ceremonial groundbreaking to take place Wed., Dec. 14

The Glen Oaks Community College Board of Trustees voted at a special meeting Wednesday afternoon to approve a $5,327,359 bid submitted by Frederick Construction, Inc. to construct a new student resident hall on the college’s campus.  This bid includes all the desired alternative options including scheduled completion of the project by August 4, 2017.

Glen Oaks President David Devier said that the project will create a new opportunity for our students to have a complete college experience. “At the same time, the project is a green light for the college to offer more specialized programs that will draw students from all of West Michigan and northern Indiana,” said Devier.

Frederick Construction, Inc., headquartered in Vicksburg, MI, has completed a number of projects for K-12 and higher education institutions throughout West Michigan and beyond.

Glen Oaks will be the first Michigan community college to use a low-cost (2.38 percent) USDA Rural Development federal 30-year loan to finance the housing project. In addition, Glen Oaks will be the ninth Michigan community college to add residence halls to its campus.

The three-story, 108-bed student housing project plans include two- and four-suite units that share kitchen and living areas and two bathrooms. The facility will be located on the north side of the main parking lot, just west of the main building.

The public is invited to a special ceremonial groundbreaking for the project will take place on Wednesday, Dec. 14 at 11 a.m. in the Dresser Business Development Center.

“The hopes are that we can get construction started in the coming weeks, weather permitting,” said Devier, “and be open to the students in the Fall 2017 semester which starts in late August.”

The Other Big Issue with Michigan Colleges – Degree Completion

by Dr. David Devier
Glen Oaks Community College President

Michigan student loan debt is a serious problem facing college students, whether they are graduates or not; however, the other big concern is related to thousands of former Michigan students who have college work but no credentials, i.e., certificates or degrees to show for their efforts.

Taking this situation further, it is the fact that millions of adults in the United States are carrying student debt and have no degree to help pay it off.  While some college has shown to give the individual additional life-time income, the value of the degree considerably increases earning power.  The national statistics report that approximately half of all Americans who attended college did not earn a degree and this total is in the tens of millions.

These individuals will not benefit nearly as much as degree completers and may have debt for the student loans they incurred while attending.  In the most damaging situations, these students who did not earn a credential and are straddled with debt, feel trapped and frustrated.  According to data available from the U.S. Department of Education, the former students’ ability to repay their loans is more on whether they graduated than on how much they borrowed.

To make these data even more challenging, only 15 percent of the lower half (income) of the U.S. population have earned a degree and only 9 percent with the lower quarter.  These data do not bode well for those non-completers when most jobs now require post-secondary education.  This situation also impacts the country’s ability to make the most of the vast potential these individuals have to serve society.

Michigan data are even worse when compared to most of the country.  It is easy to proclaim that this situation is the result of the student’s lack of motivation or ability but taking this approach does not change the result.  In fact, one in five Michigan adults ages 25 or older have some college credits, but no degree, according to a “Bridge Magazine” analysis of census data.  “This fact makes Michigan the lowest of all Midwest States and while the State ranks 28th in percent of high-school graduates (61 percent) entering college, but drops to 41st in graduation rates,” reports Bridge Magazine, September, 2016.  This lack of a credential costs these individuals hundreds of thousands of dollars over their careers.

What can be done to enable these college but no credential Michigan adults to complete their work?  There are efforts being implemented to address these former students.  The Win-Win Program has been undertaken by the State’s public community colleges.  This effort identifies former students who left school needing only a few credits to graduate.   These individuals are contacted to determine what can be done to help them complete.  In some cases, these former students already have enough credit to graduate but have not applied.  Once these students are identified, all fees associated with seeking graduation are waived.  In other cases, former students only need one or two courses to complete and they are encouraged to return to school, to enroll and complete.  All fees are waived for processing the credit and graduation costs.  These efforts have enabled hundreds of Michigan students to graduate.

Another program to help non-completer students is, “Credit When It’s Due”, which identifies former community college students who have transferred to four-year universities and in most cases, had not graduated from that institution.  These students were contacted to encourage them to process transfer credit back to the given community college to complete.  Just one much advertised example of this was the conferring of an associate degree to Governor Snyder by Kellogg Community College.  He transferred the needed credit from Michigan State University back to KCC.  There have been dozens of former Michigan community college students who have been able to complete their associate degree using this method.  While these examples of new initiatives to encourage former Michigan college students to complete their intended credentials have helped, there needs to be significantly more effort expended to encourage non-completers to graduate.

At Glen Oaks Community College, we offer all the help needed to complete the credentials students began with us, no matter when or where you attended.  If you know of anyone who can benefit from completing their intended credential, please encourage them to call, stop by, or e-mail the college and we will do our utmost to serve them in achieving their goals.  Let’s make the current college dropout data the past by increasing the completion rate in St. Joseph County.

Glen Oaks to name gymnasium in honor of former basketball coach – “Ken Schuler Court,” – dedication this Saturday, Nov. 12

When the Glen Oaks Viking Men’s basketball team takes the court this Saturday in its home opener, the team will play on the newly refurbished – “Ken Schuler Court.”

The hardwood gym floor was restored over the past summer to a shiny, smooth and colorful gloss thanks to a donation in the name of a Glen Oaks Community College icon. The dedication of the new court will be held this Saturday, Nov. 12 at 2:30 p.m. in the Glen Oaks Community College gymnasium. The Lady Vikings play at 1 p.m. with the Men’s team following at 3 p.m.

Vi Schuler, of Sturgis, graciously funded the refurbishing of the floor where her late husband, Ken Schuler, spent years as head basketball coach, guiding the Viking Men’s teams through many outstanding seasons. The extended Schuler family will be on hand for this special event.

“On behalf of the GOCC Foundation, we were very pleased to work with Vi Schuler in supporting her family request to update the basketball court in Ken’s honor,” said Mike Doe, GOCC Foundation president. “This beautiful updated court will be enjoyed by many people for decades attending a variety of events at Glen Oaks Community College. A sincere thanks to Vi and the Schuler family.”

“Workers were able to sand down the original gym floor and repair a few boards before completing the refinishing project,” said Courtney Ivan, GOCC athletic director. “New painted designs were applied, including a colorful new Viking logo at center court. Sealing coats were then applied to create a high-sheen, resilient finish.”

In addition to the new appearance of the floor, the former gymnasium has a name – the “Ken Schuler Court.”

“This is a special tribute to a Viking legend,” said Ivan. “In addition, it’s a new and modern look that also serves as a great recruitment tool.”

Kenneth Schuler coached for 30 years including 24 years as mentor of Viking basketball. While at Glen Oaks, he developed the physical education program, was a professor and athletic director. In 1996, he was inducted into the Basketball Coaches Association of Michigan Hall of Fame and was credited with inspiring countless players to develop character and academic achievement.

Coach Schuler passed away in 2014 at the age of 76. “Ken would be so humbled to see his name embedded on the court,” reflected his widow, Vi Schuler. “The family is grateful to the Glen Oaks Foundation for bestowing this honor on our husband, father and grandfather. Pleasantly, we believe this to be one important ‘footprint’ of his life here on earth.”

Horizon Bank donates $2,500 to Glen Oaks Community College

Jeff Gatton (center), president of Horizon Bank in Three Rivers, presented a check for $2,500 to the Glen Oaks Community College Foundation on Monday, Nov. 7. Also pictured from left are GOCC Foundation Director Pam Hughes and GOCC President, Dr. David Devier. “We are pleased to be able to support the community, said Gatton, “along with the great work the college is doing.”

 

Study shows Glen Oaks Community College added $119.3 million in income to local economy

An economic impact study conducted for Glen Oaks Community College indicates that the college, its students, and regional alumni added $119.3 million in income to the local economy in 2015-16, approximately equal to four percent of the region’s total GRP.

Conducted by Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI), of Moscow, Idaho, the study reports, “The value of Glen Oaks Community College influences both the lives of students and also the regional economy. The college serves a range of industries in the GOCC surrounding communities, supports local businesses, and benefits society as a whole in Michigan and northern Indiana from an expanded economy and improved quality of life. The benefits extend to the state government through increased tax revenues and public sector savings.

Glen Oaks added $7 million in added income to the region during the past year as a result of its day-to-day operations  —  equivalent to supporting 102 jobs. The spending by Glen Oaks students during the same time period was $224,000 equaling 12 jobs.

“The numbers speak for themselves,” said Glen Oaks President David Devier, “and confirm that Glen Oaks is a great investment for the students and the community. Glen Oaks contributes to our quality of life in many ways. We are grateful for the support of the community.”

The report also touched on the accumulated contribution of Glen Oaks alumni currently employed in the regional workforce, equating the value at $112.1 million, equal to 3,828 jobs.

The college generates more tax revenue than it collects. These benefits to taxpayers consist primarily of taxes paid to state government and used to benefit the region and state. There are also benefits for all taxpayers via reduced costs by lowering the need for the state to pay for health care, crime and unemployment.

These savings to taxpayers amount to $997,236. Total benefits equal $23.1 million, equal to the sum of added taxes and public sector savings. This means that for every $1 of public money, the taxpayers received a communitive value of $8.30. The average rate of return is 22.6 percent, a solid investment that compares favorably with other long-term investments from both the private and public sectors.

Glen Oaks Board of Trustees approves USDA loan resolution for student housing project

The Glen Oaks Community College Board of Trustees voted at this morning’s board meeting to approve the USDA loan resolution on a $6.5 million campus housing project.

The college will be the first Michigan community college to use a low-cost (2.38 percent) USDA Rural Development federal 30-year loan to finance the housing project. In addition, Glen Oaks will be the ninth Michigan community college to add residence halls to its campus.

“This is big news for the college,” said David Devier, Glen Oaks president. “The added dimension of a residence hall to the campus will allow students the opportunity for a complete college experience. Campus housing is a significant asset that will help us in recruiting and attracting students from all of west Michigan and northern Indiana.”

“This is a fantastic investment not just for Glen Oaks Community College but also for the students,” said U.S. Rep. Fred Upton, R-St. Joseph. “In the long run, the entire Southwest Michigan region wins because the students drawn to Glen Oaks will become part of the well-trained, well-educated workforce for which this region is known.”

Designed by Hollis/Miller architects, of Kansas City, Missouri, the 108-bed, three-story, facility calls for two- and four-suite units that share kitchen and living areas. The building will be located on the northeast corner of the main parking lot.

The next phase of the project involves putting together final architectural plans and obtaining construction bids.

“Groundbreaking on the residence hall is expected yet this fall, with plans for the facility to open with the commence of the Fall, 2017 semester.”

 

Photo: Above, is the Hollis/Miller architect’s rendition of the new residential hall to be constructed just west of the main entrance to the college and on the north side of the main parking lot.

 

It’s College Night in St. Joseph County – Tuesday, Oct. 11, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Glen Oaks Community College Gymnasium Over 50 colleges and military organizations expected to participate

Area high school students, parents and members of the community are invited to visit Glen Oaks Community College on Tuesday, Oct. 11th for the 26th annual St. Joseph County College Night. Representatives from over 50 colleges and military organizations will to be on hand to meet prospective students and share information on their institutions. The event will be held in the college gymnasium from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

“This is an opportunity for students and parents to meet and speak directly with college representatives throughout the evening, without having to visit various campuses, make telephone calls, or search the web for information,” said Adrienne Skinner, Glen Oaks Director of Admissions.

College representatives will answer questions about the admission process, entrance requirements and programming. Students will have the benefit of exploring higher education options available to them, all in one convenient location.

Centro Vida will offer a free presentation in Spanish to Hispanic students and parents from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. in the Dresser Business Development Auditorium.

A free Financial Aid Information Session will take place from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. in the Nora Hagen Theatre, Room D235 at Glen Oaks. Jean Zimmerman, Glen Oaks director of financial aid, will discuss how students and families can take advantage of federal and state grants, scholarships and loans. Zimmerman will also address the application timelines and deadlines critical to the overall financial aid process.

In addition to Glen Oaks, the list of colleges and U.S. military agencies expected to participate are listed below:

Adrian College
Albion College
Alma College
Andrews University
Aquinas College
Baker College
Ball State University
Calvin College
Central Michigan University
Cleary University
Davenport University
Eastern Michigan University
Ferris State University
Ferris State University – Dowagiac
Finlandia University
Glen Oaks
Goshen College
Grace Bible College
Grand Valley State University
Holy Cross College
Indiana Tech
Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis
Indiana University South Bend
Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne (IPFW)
Kalamazoo Valley Community College
Kellogg Community College
Kettering University
Lake Michigan College
Lake Superior State University
Lawrence Technological University
Madonna University
Manchester University
Michigan Colleges Alliance
Michigan State University
Michigan State University – Institute of Agricultural Technology
Michigan Technological University
Northern Michigan University
Northwood University
Oakland University
Olivet College
Saginaw Valley State University
Saint Joseph’s College
Saint Mary’s College
Siena Heights University
Southwestern Michigan College
Spring Arbor University
Trine University
Trine University
United States Navy
University of Evansville
University of Michigan
University of Michigan-Dearborn
University of Michigan-Flint
University of Saint Francis
Valparaiso University
Western Michigan University
WMU Army ROTC

In order to make the most out of the event, Skinner recommends that students and parents prepare to ask questions of the college representatives. Some questions to consider include the following:

 

  • What are the admissions requirements?
  • What assistance is available if I am undecided about my career goal?
  • Do you offer the program of study that interests me? Are there special requirements for admission to that program?
  • What deadlines should I be especially aware of as I consider applying?
  • How do I arrange a campus tour and a meeting with a college advisor?
  • What employment assistance do you provide prior to and after graduation?
  • What kinds of support services do you offer?
  • Do you have on-campus housing? What other living arrangements do you offer?
  • What student organizations or activities does the college offer?
  • Can you provide me with information about tuition and fees?
  • How do I apply for financial assistance? Am I eligible for scholarships?

 

For more information, contact the Glen Oaks Community College Admissions Office at (269) 467-9945, Ext. 253 or toll free (888) 994-7818.

 

Glen Oaks Foundation to host Second Annual Gala “Diamonds, Donors and Dollars for Scholars” – Fri., Oct. 7

The Glen Oaks Community College Foundation is busy planning for the Second Annual Gala “Diamonds, Donors and Dollars for Scholars,” to be held on Friday, Oct 7 at 6 p.m. on the concourse at the college.

The public is invited to join alumni and friends of the college to this extravaganza. “Last year the event raised over $18,000 for scholarships,” said Pam Hughes, executive director of the Glen Oaks Foundation.

Hors d’ oeuvres and drinks will be served from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Guests will have the opportunity to participate in a silent/live auction and win a half-carat diamond by Fiebig Jewelers. Highlighted auction items include a week’s stay at a cabin on Diamond Lake, a fishing charter on Lake Michigan and tuition and fees to apply toward an associate degree.

Tickets are $50 per person.  Reserved tables are available for party(s) of six or more.  Call Pam Hughes at (269) 294-4384 for more information.

 

Appeal of Grades

Policy 3.24

Within a month of receipt of the grade, the student will appeal the grade to the course instructor and present facts that document the necessity for a grade change. These facts might include copies of quiz or test grades and grades on papers or final exams. The discussion should cover the calculation of the grade using the process described in the course syllabus. The burden of persuasion shall be on the student. The student and the instructor will review the facts and the instructor will render an opinion based upon his or her professional judgment.
If the grade appeal is not satisfactorily resolved, the student may send a letter of appeal to the Dean of Academics & Extended Learning, who will forward a copy of this letter to the instructor. The student must appeal the grade in writing within two months of receipt of the grade. Some reasons for a grade appeal might be:
The grade was calculated in a manner inconsistent with the course syllabus or the changes to the syllabus.
The grading standards for the course were arbitrary, capricious, or unequally applied.

The Appeal Committee comprised of the Dean of Academics & Extended Learning, and the instructor will review the facts. The instructor will be asked to demonstrate that the grade was determined in a manner consistent with the course syllabus. Only when there is due cause such as item 2b, the Dean of Academics & Extended Learning will have the authority to change the grade without the instructor’s support. The decision of the Appeal Committee is final.

Effective: Fall 2001

July 1992, revised October 2001, reviewed 9/14/05, revised 9/17/14.

Glen Oaks announces Summer 2016 scholars

Glen Oaks announces Summer 2016 scholars

Centreville, MI — Glen Oaks Community College announces its outstanding scholars for the Summer 2016 Semester. Students on the President’s Honor Roll achieved a grade point average of 3.75-4.0. Students on the Dean’s Honor Roll achieved a grade point average of 3.5-3.74. The students are listed alphabetically according to their towns of residency.

 

President’s Honor Roll

Michigan Residents

Centreville

Emily Sheteron, Samantha Wells

 

Coldwater

Jamison Maxson

 

Constantine

Tina Pusateri

 

Kalamazoo

Modeste Mukaneza

 

Leonidas

Crystal Salyer

 

Sherwood

Heather Schumacher

 

Sturgis
Meaghan Anderson, Kimberly Davis, Timothy Freehling , Olivia Morris-Blond, Rebecca Mulkey, Kalee Schrock, Leslie Tullos, Ann Ware, Edna Yoder

 

Three Rivers

Steven Bartolameolli, Taylor Batten, Shelby Donohue, Melissa Hucko, Stephen Murphy, Kristen Regan

 

White Pigeon

Brittany Harman, Charlotte Moreno

 

Indiana Residents
Milford

Aimee Trammell

 

DEAN’s Honor Roll

 

Michigan Residents

Burr Oak

Samantha Cupp, Rayshell Losinski

 

Centreville

Rebecca Clementz

 

Coldwater

Desirae Case

 

Constantine

Brandon Mellin

 

Lawrence

Erica Vrhel

 

Sturgis

Emily Anderson, Cierra Conklin, Charen Keesling, Brittany Kindig, Sheila Miller, Ashley Stickney, Caitlin Webb

 

Three Rivers

Lisa Chapman, Steve Eichorn, Shantil Glessner, Meranda Hubin, SherRon Jones, Rebecca Lorenz, Sara Loren, Joshua Nordahl, Jamie Rivers, Troy Russell, Hannah Wilkins

 

Wayland

Danielle Worvey

 

White Pigeon

Sharon Walls

Assistant Volleyball Coach

Posting Date: September 1, 2016

Position(s): Assistant Volleyball Coach

Job Type: Part-Time

Job Information: Asst_Volleyball

Closing Date: Open until filled

Glen Oaks opens fall semester with enrollment increase

Classes at Glen Oaks Community College began this week with student enrollment up 16 percent.

Glen Oaks is only one of just five Michigan Community Colleges reporting enrollment increases (Alpena: 2.9 percent, Gogebic: .93 percent, Lake Michigan 1.7 percent and Washtenaw: 4.5 percent). Most of Michigan’s community colleges are reporting continued declines between 2 and 10 percent.

Last year, Glen Oaks experienced a 2.7 percent increase in fall semester enrollment, turning the corner on a five-year downward trend.

“We still have about 200 Career and Technical Education (CTE) students to enroll,” said Dr. David Devier, Glen Oaks president. “I expect the final numbers to show about a 10 percent increase in students  and about the same in contact hours. We’ve worked hard to make the necessary changes to better meet the needs of our student population.”

“In the last couple of years, we have added new associate and certificate degree programs, reintroduced programs that had previously been shut down when interest was low, and formed new partnerships with four-year institutions to help create pathways for programs,” said Devier. “In addition, many of our programs are now offered in a variety of formats, such as online, evenings, and the open-entry/open-exit lab concept, in an effort to offer more flexibility to our students, particularly those who are in the workforce.”

The college’s largest increase has recently been in the high school population as CTE student enrollment and dual enrollment are both up, and the Early Middle College program was officially launched earlier this year.

“The high school enrollment trend will continue to increase as the Early Middle College expands. Through this program, students plan their curriculum early on, take college classes during high school and finish with an associate degree or vocational certificate by adding one year to their high school careers.”

Photo Caption: Glen Oaks President David Devier welcomed students this to the campus on the first day of fall semester classes. Students received academic planners as a welcome gift from the college.

Vaupell Midwest molding donates electrical discharge machine to Glen Oaks

Students in the Glen Oaks Community College Machine Tool program will now be able to work and learn on a new piece of equipment, thanks to the generosity of Vaupell Midwest Molding, of Constantine, Mich.

Vaupell has donated an electrical discharge machine to be housed in the newly renovated Machine Shop at the college.

“By donating this piece of equipment, we are able to assist in helping educate the Glen Oaks students in machine shop and tooling,” said Jeremy Howard, plant manager at Vaupell. “We’re pleased to be able to support Glen Oaks, as we believe that machine tooling and machine manufacturing is an important future for St. Joseph County and our communities.”

“As a former graduate from Glen Oaks, I’m specifically and personally pleased to be able to help,” said Howard. “Vaupell has several other Glen Oaks alumni, and we are all interested in seeing this area grow and develop in the community and at the College.”

Electrical discharge machining (EDM), sometimes referred to as spark machining or burning, is a manufacturing process whereby a desired shape is obtained using electrical discharges.

 

Photo Caption:  Glen Oaks Community College students will benefit from a new electrical discharge machine recently donated to the college from Vaupell Midwest Molding, of Constantine. From left are Vaupell’s Zachary Wood, apprentice toolmaker, and Dennis Wood, tooling manager, pictured with Paul Aivars, GOCC’s director of business services. Zachary is enrolled in the Machine Technologies program at the college.

EMT 101 MEDICAL FIRST RESPONDER/EMERGENCY MEDICAL RESPONDER AND EMT


3.6 Credits, 4.5 Contacts

The MFR is the first level of responder to an emergency. The MFR course is a study of the topics and skills necessary to make life saving interventions and stabilize patients in a prehospital environment while waiting the arrival of more advanced care. Students who are successful in this course are eligible for licensing as a Medical First Responder through the Michigan Department of Community Health via the National Registry of EMT’s exam. Course also includes the opportunity to encounter the care of patients not only at the scene of an emergency, but during the transport and transfer of patients to higher levels of care. This clinical experience requires that MFR’s serve as an EMS team member during emergency care for 16 hours of patient care utilizing an Advanced Life Support agency.

 
Prerequisite: None

EMT 103 EMT BASIC PART II


7.4 Credits, 9.2 Contacts

Emergency Medical Technician is a fundamental course that is designed to provide you with the knowledge, skills and experience to function as a competent, entry-level practitioner. EMT’s are the first level of care in the transport of patients from the prehospital setting. The EMT course is a study of the topics and skills necessary to make life saving interventions and stabilize patients during transport to a medical facility. Successful students are eligible for licensing as an EMT Basic through the Michigan Department of Community Health via the National Registry of EMT’s certification exam.

 
Prerequisite: EMT 101

Student Policies

Student Policies

Student Policies – General

Policy 3.51

  1. A student who is indebted to the college and who fails to make satisfactory settlement of this indebtedness may be dismissed. A student who has prior unsettled indebtedness to the college may not register in any new semester. During the period in which the indebtedness remains unsettled, no evidence of attendance or other official credentials may be obtained from the college. It is important that there be strict enforcement of this policy by the Dean of Finance and Administrative Services and Assistant Dean of Students.
  2. All students are expected to meet the normal health standards that are necessary for a successful pursuit of college work. Faculty members should notify the Dean of Academics & Extended Learning if it is noted that a student needs medical services.
  3. It is against the school policy for a sales representative to call upon students on college property.
  4. Social, professional and other student organizations are permitted where approved by the administration. Securing a Faculty sponsor is the responsibility of all approved organizations. Without a sponsor, the organization may not convene.
  5. All student publications eligible for distribution on campus are to be authorized by the President and will be assigned an official faculty advisor. Violation of this policy will subject a student to suspension from school.
  6. Smoking is permitted only in the parking lot(s) within private vehicles located on the campus. (Please refer to Policy 2.51)

 

July 1992, revised July 2002, revised 9/14/05, 9/17/14.
 

Smoke-Free Campus

 
Neither smoking nor tobacco in any form is allowed on campus–the corridors, entryways, the offices, the classrooms, or on the Concourse.

No smoking is allowed in the parking lots, however, persons may smoke inside their vehicles within the parking lot. The Michigan legislature passed a no smoking law, the Dr. Ron Davis Smoke Free Air Law in 2009 with final implementation on May 1, 2010.

Glen Oaks Community College Grievance Procedures

Policy 2.61
 

For:

Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
Title IX of the Education Amendment Act of 1972
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
Age Discrimination Act of 1975
Title II of the Americans with Disability Act of 1990

 

Section I
Any person believing that Glen Oaks Community College or any part of the organization has inadequately applied the principles and/or regulations of (1) Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, (2) Title IX of the Education Amendment Act of 1972, (3) Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, (4) the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, and (5) Title II of the Americans with Disability Act of 1990 may bring forward a complaint, which shall be referred to as a grievance to:

Candy Bohacz
Civil Rights Coordinator
62249 Shimmel Rd.
Centreville, MI 49032
(269) 467-9945

 

Section II
The person who believes a valid basis for grievance exists shall discuss the grievance informally and on a verbal basis with the Civil Rights Coordinator, who shall in turn investigate the complaint and reply within five (5) business days. If the complainant feels the grievance is not satisfactorily resolved, they may initiate formal procedures according to the following steps:

Step 1: A written statement of the grievance signed by the complainant shall be submitted to the Civil Rights Coordinator within five (5) business days of receipt of answers to the informal complaint. The Coordinator shall further investigate the matters of grievance and reply in writing to the complainant within five (5) business days.

Step 2: A complainant wishing to appeal the decision of the Civil Rights Coordinator may submit a signed statement of appeal to the President of the College within five (5) business days after receipt of the Coordinator’s response. The President shall meet with all parties involved, formulate a conclusion, and respond in writing to the complainant within ten (10) business days.

Anyone at any time may contact the U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights for information and/or assistance at (216) 522-4970. If the grievance has not been satisfactorily settled, further appeal may be made to the Regional U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights, 600 Superior Ave. East, Bank One Center, Suite 750, Cleveland, OH 44114-2611.

Inquiries concerning the nondiscriminatory policy may be directed to Director, Office of Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Ave. SW, Washington, D.C. 20202. The local Coordinator, on request, will provide the complainant with a copy of the College’s grievance procedure and investigate all complaints in accordance with this procedure. A copy of each of the Acts and regulations on which this notice is based may be found in the Civil Rights Coordinator’s office.
 

Adopted by the Board of Trustees Feb. 20, 2008, revised June 11, 2014.

Student Concern Procedure

Policy 3.65
 

Informal Process

  1. Listen to students talk about their problems. Most student concerns can be resolved informally. Students will discuss their concerns with faculty or staff that they know well. Often this means listening to students vent about their concerns.
  2. Propose the mediation process to students. After the venting has taken place, there might be an opportunity to talk about the mediation process as a way to get to a win-win solution.
  3. Encourage students to talk with the person to whom the concern is directed. We should encourage students to resolve concerns with the person with whom they have the conflict. Discussion between both parties can often resolve the conflict. The possibility of resolving the conflict increases if the process of mediation can be used.

If the conflict is not resolved, students should be referred to the Dean of the area which the concern applies.
 

Assistant Dean of Students
If the issue is an infraction of the Student Code of Conduct, refer the student to the Assistant Dean of Students, Assistant Dean of Enrollment Services/Registrar to complete an Incident Report. If not, do the following:

  1. The Director of Academic Services will provide students with a packet of information that describes the Student Concern process and outlines steps in mediation.
  2. The Director of Academic Services will ask students if they had discussed this issue with the other party.

    1. If yes, and the issue is not resolved, students should complete the Student Concern Report
    2. If no, students should be encouraged to talk with the other party. If they are reluctant to do so, the Administrative Assistant will help students complete the Student Concern Report.
  3. (Note: Completion of the Student Concern Report formalizes the process.)

  4. The Director of Academic Services will log in the concern and refer the Student Concern Report to the Dean of Academics and Extended Learning. A copy of the Student Concern Report will be forwarded to the employee’s supervisor.

 

Formal Process
The Dean of Academics & Extended Learning will review the Student Concern Report. Based upon the nature of the concern, the Dean of Teaching & Learning will determine how the concern should be handled.
 

Mediators
The mediator needs to have received training in mediation. The mediator needs to be a neutral party and does not have the authority to impose a solution nor render a judgement. The mediator must use the mediation process to help both parties resolve the concern so that there is a win-win solution.

When a Student Concern is referred to mediation, the Mediation Center for St. Joseph and Cass Counties will be contacted. The Mediation Center will charge $20 per case and will find a mediator with 7-10 days. At the present time they have 14 trained volunteer mediators who are available only during the evening. One individual presently being trained will be available during the day. In addition, two to four college personnel will receive mediation training to supplement those available from the Mediation Center.

When a Student Concern Report is referred, the following role is expected of the individual doing the mediation:

  1. Contact both parties within a week of the filed date.
  2. Meet separately with each party and identify central issues.
  3. Schedule a meeting to initiate the mediation process. This might require more than one meeting.
  4. Assist both parties in identifying a win-win solution.

    1. If the concern is resolved, indicate the resolution on the Student Concern Report.
    2. If the concern is not resolved, refer the concern to the Mediation Review Committee to render judgement.

 

Mediation Review Committee
This committee will be comprised of three faculty or staff who are not involved with the concern. The Committee would be appointed by the Dean of Academics & Extended Learning and rotate annually. The role of the Committee would be to review the facts and render judgement about the concern.

If the student wants to appeal the decision of the Mediation Review Committee, the appeal can be brought to the Appeal Committee.
 

Appeal Committee
A special Appeal Committee will be formed to review the appeal and render a judgement. Possible members of this Appeal Committee include the President of the Faculty Senate, the Dean of Academics & Extended Learning, and the President of Glen Oaks.
 

Procedures
Administrative Assistant to the Dean of Academics & Extended Learning should assist the student in completing the Student Concern Report and should provide the student with a copy of the procedures.

Maintain an annual spreadsheet with the following information:

  1. Date the Concern was originally submitted.
  2. Nature of the concern.
  3. Steps taken to resolve the concern.
  4. Final decision
  5. Any external actions taken.

Each Student Concern Report should be numbered.

The original Student Concern Reports should be retained in the Office and copies should be forwarded based upon the recommendation of the Dean of Academics and Extended Learning. The Student Concern Reports should be filed in alphabetical order. The resolutions should be stapled to the original report.

Unresolved concerns should be highlighted and drawn to the attention of the Dean of Academics and Extended Learning on a weekly basis.

The Administrative Assistant to the Dean of Academics & Extended Learning should send a letter to both parties describing how the concern was addressed and the final decision. A copy of this letter should be stapled with the original Student Concern Report.

The Administrative Assistant to the Dean of Academics & Extended Learning should compile the Student Concern Reports into various categories. These categories will be determined by the Dean of Academics & Extended Learning after there has been sufficient experience with the process. Some examples might be grade issues, course outlines, and consistency of treatment. The results of this summation will be used to improve procedures and policies of the College.

Adopted by Board of Trustees January 12, 2000, revised February 9, 2000, title updates made 2012, 9/17/14.
 

Access to the Student Concern Report form is available online via our College Concern Report Form.

Alcohol and Drug Abuse Policy

Policy 3.40
 

Philosophy
The Glen Oaks Community College Board of Trustees certifies and pledges that it will provide a drug-free workplace and learning environment for its employees and students. This pledge is in compliance with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988, 34 CFR Part 85, Subpart F and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 (Public Law 101-226).

Glen Oaks Community College recognizes that clear evidence exists that the misuse and abuse of alcohol and drugs can erode the foundation of the College’s goals and objectives and can diminish the attainment of intellectual, social, physical and moral growth and development. Glen Oaks is committed to a healthy and productive college environment by providing free literature and abuse referral services.
 

Standards of Conduct
The Glen Oaks Community College Board of Trustees prohibits the possession, use, distribution, dispensing and unlawful manufacturing of illegal drugs, narcotics or controlled substances on the College campus, in student housing, or at any College-approved student activity (i.e., College-approved student travel and for overnight stays).

Marijuana prescribed for medicinal purposes is also prohibited on the College campus, in student housing, or at any College-approved student activity. GOCC receives federal funding through Title IV in the form of student financial aid (grants, loans, and work-study programs) and through federal research grants. As a condition of accepting these funds, the College is required to certify that it complies with the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (DFSCA) (20 U.S.C. 1145g part 86 of the Drug and
Alcohol Abuse Prevention Regulations). The federal government regulates drugs through the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) (21 U.S.C. A 811) which does not recognize the difference between medical and recreational use of marijuana. Thus, to comply with the Federal Drug Free School and Communities Act and to avoid losing federal funding, Glen Oaks Community College must prohibit all marijuana use, including medical marijuana.

No alcohol or other intoxicating liquors shall be kept, used or consumed on campus, in student housing, or at any College-approved student activity (i.e., College-approved student travel and/or overnight stays), except at approved functions at the Nora Hagen House and its adjacent yards.

Persons who are on the College campus and who appear to be under the influence of alcoholic beverages, narcotics or illegal drugs, will be removed from the College campus.

Any person taking prescription drugs or over-the-counter medication is individually responsible for ensuring that while taking the drug or medication, he/she is not a safety risk to themselves or others while on College property, at College-related events, while driving a College or privately owned vehicle while engaged in College business. It is illegal to misuse prescribed drugs contrary to the prescription or to give or sell the prescribed drug(s) to another person.
 

Legal Sanctions
Glen Oaks Community College abides by all local, state and federal laws and may ask an appropriate law enforcement agency to impose appropriate sanctions if a violation of any local, state or federal law shall take place on the College campus or at any College function.

When there is probable cause, which is based upon credible information, Glen Oaks Community College may require that a student or employee be tested for alcohol or illegal drugs. The failure to submit to a breathalyzer test for alcohol or a urinalysis test for illegal drugs may result in disciplinary action. The words “probable cause” as used herein shall be defined as a reasonable basis for the formulation of a belief that an individual is using and/or abusing alcoholic beverages or illegal drugs.

The words “credible information” is defines as including, but not limited
to, the following “warning signs”:

(1) Excessive absenteeism or tardiness;
(2) Excessive illness;
(3) Deteriorating or inconsistent work performance;
(4) Increased carelessness;
(5) Decrease in attention span, especially after breaks or lunch;
(6) Frequent brushing of the teeth or use of mouthwash, breath spray, breath mints or other breath fresheners, especially before conferences with instructors or administrators;
(7) Substantial increase in use of the rest room or water cooler;
(8) Avoidance of instructors, administrators or other students, especially if this is a recent change in behavior;
(9) Deteriorating or inconsistent attention to personal grooming and neatness;
(10) Financial problems, especially if the student has not previously had such problems;
(11) Frequent licking of the lips;
(12) Nervousness, especially when discussing work performance or personal life;
(13) Gastric disturbances or change in appetite;
(14) Insomnia;
(15) Moody behavior or “mood swings”;
(16) Unexplainable bruised and/or puffy skin, especially in the face;
(17) Dilated pupils;
(18) Slurred or incoherent speech;
(19) Lack of dexterity;
(20) Uncontrollable crying or laughing.

Glen Oaks Community College students and employees can assist in the detection of the use and/or abuse of alcohol and drugs by looking for these “warning signs”. Students or employees who use and/or abuse alcoholic beverages and/or drugs while on campus, in student housing, or while attending a College-approved student activity shall be subject to sanctions that may include any of the following: verbal warning, written letter of censure, suspension or immediate dismissal (should the behavior be both improper and a potential threat to the College or the College community). A student convicted of a drug-related offense under federal or state law may also become ineligible for federal student aid under federal law.
 

Pre-Employment Drug Testing
In order to strive toward a drug-free workplace, Glen Oaks Community College will require a pre-employment urinalysis for new employees. This applies to all full-time and part-time permanent positions at Glen Oaks Community College. The urinalysis will be performed by a reputable clinical laboratory, the expense of which will be assumed by Glen Oaks Community College. If the urinalysis registers a positive result (the presence of narcotics or illegal drugs), the candidate will not be hired.
 

Employee Alcohol and Drug Use
Any employee who consumes alcoholic beverages while actively engaged in carrying out the duties and responsibilities of their employment (excluding College-sponsored “entertainment” functions which employees may attend in connection with their employment), and any employee who uses illegal drugs while in the course of employment, shall be subject to sanctions as outlined in the appropriate Collective Bargaining Agreements and/or the Glen Oaks Community College Policy Manual. Violations by faculty or staff may result in disciplinary action up to, and including termination of employment. Employees who have CDL will be required to undergo mandatory random drug/alcohol testing as notified by the HR Department. If a Glen Oaks Community College employee is convicted of violating a criminal drug statute (non-alcohol related) on the College campus, or at a College function, that employee must notify Glen Oaks within five (5) days after such conviction. Within thirty (30) days after such conviction, Glen Oaks shall take one of the following actions: (1) take appropriate personnel action against the employee up to and including termination; and/or (2) require the employee to satisfactorily participate in an approved drug abuse assistance or rehabilitation program. Glen Oaks Community College shall also notify the appropriate agency of the Department of Education within ten (10) days after the conviction.
 

Alcohol and Drug Education, Prevention and Referral
Glen Oaks Community College is committed to addressing the problem of substance abuse through education, prevention and referral. The President of the College will designate a Glen Oaks Community College employee as the Substance Abuse Counselor. The Substance Abuse Counselor will annually coordinate/organize and make available free literature to students and employees. This information will include: (1) standards of conduct, (2) a description of the legal sanctions, (3) a description of the health risks, (4) a description of drug or alcohol programs available to students and employees, and (5) a clear statement of the Glen Oaks Community College sanctions it may impose on students and employees. The Substance Abuse Counselor will provide initial counseling and limited supportive services. The primary goal of the Substance Abuse Counselor is to provide the student or the employee with a referral for treatment or rehabilitation. Once a referral is made, the Substance Abuse Counselor shall provide the appropriate follow up.

College employees or students who exhibit “warning signs” of drug/alcohol misuse or abuse in the workplace and who refer themselves for assistance will be supported, educated, and referred to appropriate agencies for treatment. Those employees or students who are diagnosed as drug or alcohol misusers or abusers shall receive the same consideration and opportunity for treatment that is extended to persons with any other type of illness. Confidentiality shall be maintained and no adverse effects to an employee or a student shall result based upon a request for treatment or a diagnosis of misuse or abuse.

If an employee has been referred to the Substance Abuse Counselor by a supervisor or if a student has been referred to the Substance Abuse Counselor by an instructor or a College administrator and if treatment is recommended and treatment is refused or terminated, the fact of such refusal or termination of treatment shall be made known to the individual who referred the employee or student to the Substance Abuse Counselor. If an employee or a student (1) refuses to accept diagnosis and treatment, or (2) fails to respond to treatment, and if the result of such refusal or failure is such that job performance, behavior on campus or learning ability is affected, that person shall be considered in violation of College policies and shall be subject to discipline.

Additional information about the physical and psychological consequences of substance abuse is available in the Glen Oaks Library and through the Glen Oaks Community College Substance Abuse Counselor in Student Services. Glen Oaks Community College also works closely with the Substance Abuse agencies in the area.

Glen Oaks Community College will review its Drug and Alcohol Prevention Program every two (2) years in an attempt to determine its effectiveness and to implement changes as needed.

Adopted by Board of Trustees June 12, 1991, revised 9/14/05, 9/17/14,
8/10/17

Transgender Policy

Policy 3.75

Glen Oaks Community College is committed to a College culture that respects and values all students and employees and fosters understanding of gender identity within the College community. All students and employees will adhere to procedures established in connection with this policy to ensure a safe working and learning environment, free of discrimination and harassment.
 

Jurisdiction of the Policy
All questions or concerns regarding the College’s Transgender Policy will be handled by the Dean of Students (for students, community members, and visitors) and the Director of Human Resources (for College employees):

Tonya Howden
Dean of Students
Message Tonya Howden
269-294-4230
Jamie Yesh
Director of Human Resources
Message Jamie Yesh
269-294-4229
 

Definitions

  1. Sex:  The classification of people as male or female as assigned at birth.
  2. Gender Identity:  One’s internal, deeply held sense of one’s gender that may nor may not conform to that typically associated with the sex they were assigned at birth. For some people, their gender identity does not fit neatly into one of the two choices.
  3. Gender Expression:  External manifestations of gender, expressed through one’s name, pronouns, clothing, haircut, behavior, voice, or body characteristics.
  4. Sexual Orientation:  An individual’s enduring physical, romantic and/or emotional attraction to another person. Gender identity and sexual orientation are not the same. Transgender people may be heterosexual, lesbian, gay, or bisexual. For example, a person who transitions from male to female and is attracted solely to men would identify as a heterosexual woman.
  5. Transgender:  An umbrella term for people whose gender identity and/or gender expression differs from what is typically associated with the sex they were assigned at birth. People under the transgender umbrella may describe themselves using one or more of a wide variety of terms – including transgender.
  6. Transitioning:  Transitioning refers to processes undertaken by some transgender people to align their gender expression with their gender identity. Aspects of transitioning may include social processes (e.g., telling others, changes in appearance, using a preferred name and/or different pronouns), medical processes (e.g., hormone therapies, gender confirmation surgery), and/or legal processes (e.g., obtaining a court-ordered name change and/or change in legal sex designation).

 

Procedures

  1. Campus Records:  At the request of the student, the College will engage in reasonable and good faith efforts to use a preferred name and/or gender on internal College records such as class rosters and class schedules. The College is not permitted to use a preferred name and/or gender on the following records: enrollment verifications, transcripts, diplomas, financial aid documents, Visa documents, W-2 forms, and third party reports. There may be some situations where it may be necessary to clarify that a preferred name is different from a legal name. Examples of this include official interactions with police/law enforcement, security, and verification of medical records.
  2. Restrooms:  All students, faculty, staff, and visitors have the right to use the restroom that coincides with their gender identity.
  3. Privacy:  College personnel shall not disclose information that may reveal a student’s transgender status.Under the Family Education Right to Privacy Act (FERPA), only those College employees with a legitimate educational need may have access to a student’s records or the information contained within those records.
  4. Names/Pronouns:  When requested by the student or employee, College staff should engage in reasonable and good faith efforts to address students and employees by their preferred names and pronouns that correspond to their gender identity, regardless of whether there has been a legal name change. Consistent with these guidelines, College personnel should make every effort to maintain the confidentiality of the student’s transgender status. Students who need to change their names or pronouns under this policy should submit a Change of Status form to the Records and Registration Office. College employees who need to change their names/pronouns under this policy should submit their requests to Human Resources.
  5. WebAdvisor and E-mail Addresses:  Students and employees may request an ID card be issued in the name that reflects an individual’s gender identity that is consistently asserted at College. Once a student has submitted the Change of Status Form to the Records and Registration Office and the name change is approved, the student may obtain a new student ID card. Should students need to change a College-issued e-mail address to include the name that reflects the individual’s gender identity consistently asserted at College, they should contact the Records and Registration Office, who will complete an IT work order to change the information appropriately. Records and Registration staff will notify the student of the new login information after IT has completed the request. College employees who wish to request a change of their College-issued email under this policy should submit their requests to Human Resources.
  6. Athletics and Physical Education:  Transgender students shall have the same opportunities to participate in physical education as all other students. Students may participate in physical education and athletics in accordance with the student’s gender identity that is consistently asserted at College. Participation in competitive athletic activities will be resolved on a case-by-case basis by the Title IX Coordinator and the Director of Athletics.
  7. Locker Room Accessibility:  GOCC aims to support transgender students and employees while ensuring the safety of all. The use of restrooms and locker rooms by transgender students, employees and members of the community requires colleges to consider numerous factors, including, but not limited to: the transgender individual’s preference; protecting privacy; maximizing social integration; minimizing stigmatization; ensuring equal opportunity to participate; the student’s age; and protecting the safety of all persons. A transgender student or employee who expresses a need or desire for increased privacy will be provided with reasonable alternative arrangements, which may include the use of a private area, a separate changing schedule, or a single stall restroom. A transgender person may not be required to use a locker room or restroom that conflicts with the individual’s gender identity consistently asserted at the College.
  8. Gender Segregation in Other Areas:  In any other circumstance where students are separated by gender in College activities (i.e. overnight field trips), students will be permitted to participate in accordance with their gender identity consistently asserted at College. Activities that may involve the need for accommodations to address student privacy concerns will be addressed on a case-by-case basis considering the factors set forth above.

 

Bullying, Harassment, and Discrimination
Discrimination, bullying, and harassment on the basis of sex, sexual orientation, or gender identity or expression is prohibited. It is the responsibility of the College and all staff to ensure that all students, including transgender and gender nonconforming students, have safe school environments. The scope of this responsibility includes ensuring that any incident of discrimination, harassment, or bullying is given immediate attention, including investigating the incident, taking appropriate action, and providing students and staff with appropriate resources and supports. Enforcement of anti-bullying policies should focus on education and prevention rather than exclusionary discipline.

Complaints alleging discrimination or harassment based on a student’s actual or perceived gender identity or expression are to be taken seriously and handled in the same manner as other discrimination, bullying, or harassment complaints.

Approved by Board of Trustees: 2/9/2017.

Campus Security

Policy 3.41
 

  1. Report Procedures
    When criminal actions, other emergencies or substantial rumors occur on the Glen Oaks campus, contact the President’s Office or designee at 467-9945, ext. 233 or 221. If additional assistance is needed, Glen Oaks will contact the St. Joseph County Sheriff’s Office (467-9045).Glen Oaks will take the necessary action to protect the safety of students and employees and to deal with the occurrence.
  2. Access to Campus Facilities
    The Glen Oaks building is open Monday through Thursday from 6:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.; Fridays (3rd week of August through April) from 6:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.; and Saturdays 7:30 a.m. to 4/5:00 p.m. The building is closed on Fridays’ between May and second week in August. When the building is closed and there is an event on campus, Maintenance will provide access to the appropriate area.Reservations for access to the Nora Hagen House can be made with the Center for Business Services.
  3. Authority of Campus Security
    Designated Campus Security Personnel have the authority to confront the individual related to the occurrence, require identification, and, when necessary, contact the St. Joseph County Sheriff or Michigan State Police. Campus Security is available Monday through Friday from 6 p.m. to 12 midnight, Fridays from 4 p.m. to 12 midnight and Saturdays from 7:30 a.m. to 4/5:00 p.m.When incidents occur on campus, an Incident Report must be completed and forwarded to the Dean of Finance and Administrative Services’ Office.
  4. Occurrence Statistics
    Upon request, data is available in the Dean of Finance and Administrative Services’ Office for the following criminal offenses which could be reported on the campus or to the St. Joseph County Sheriff’s Office:

    Offenses Reported

    1. Murder
    2. Rape
    3. Robbery
    4. Aggravated Assault
    5. Burglary
    6. Motor Vehicle Theft
    Arrests

    1. Liquor Law Violations
    2. Drug Abuse Violations
    3. Weapons Possessions
     

    Adopted by Board of Trustees March 11, 1992, revised 9/14/05, reviewed 9/17/14.

Due Process Procedure

Policy 3.43

  1. Introduction

    1. The fundamentals of Due Process shall be provided for students charged with violations of College codes, rules, regulations, policies or procedures. Responsibility for the disciplinary procedure shall rest with the Dean of the area where the violation occurred.
    2. Students shall have the right to be accorded Due Process in all disciplinary actions resulting in a change of their social or academic status at Glen Oaks Community College. It is with this spirit that the following procedure has been established.
  2. Definitions

    ACADEMIC — A decision to limit the number of credit hours which a student takes

    PROBATION — in any one semester until he/she improves their point average to a stated level.

    APPEAL FORM — A form to be used by the student to appeal a decision by the trier of the fact.

    DISCIPLINARY PROBATION — A decision to suspend a student’s privileges.

    DISCIPLINARY RECORD — A summary of the action taken during a particular case, including the disposition thereof.

    DISMISSAL — A decision which permanently suspends a student from College.

    EVIDENCE — Any species of proof, or probative matter, presented at the hearing of an issue by one of the parties, through the medium of witnesses, records, documents, concrete objects, etc., for the purposed of inducing belief in the minds of the trier of fact.

    GUILTY — A verdict of the trier of fact which indicates that there has been a violation of the college code, rule, regulation, policy or procedure.

    HEARING DISPOSITION SHEET — A record of the disposition which was made after a hearing of the case.

    INCIDENT REPORT — A report of the incident in which a student allegedly violated College code, rule, regulation, policy or procedure.

    NOTICE OF VIOLATION OF COLLEGE REGULATIONS — Written notification to a student which states specifically the alleged violation of a College code, rule, regulation, policy or procedure.

    PROBATION — A decision to permit a student who has been deemed guilty by the trier of fact to remain in the College as long as the stated conditions are achieved by the student.

    REPRIMAND — An official written censure.

    RESTITUTION — The restoration of anything to its rightful owner; the act of making good or giving equivalent for any loss, damage or injury; indemnification.

    SUSPENSION — A decision which dismisses a student from the College community for a specified period of time, or until a stated condition is attained.

    TRIER OF FACT — Persons who are appointed to hear and decide the student’s case, i.e., the Dean, who issues the notice, the Due Process Hearing Committee, the Appeal Board or the College President.

    WAIVER OF HEARING — A form which is utilized by a student who desires to waive his right to a hearing before a trier of fact.

    WARNING — An official written reprimand which stipulates that further violations of College code, rules, regulations, policies or procedures within a specified period of time may result in more severe disciplinary actions.

  3. Accusation

    1. Notice: Any student accused of violating any of the College codes, rules, regulations, policies or procedures shall be notified in writing by the Dean of the College, the Dean of Student Services or the Chief Operations Officer (notified official based on nature of offense) in the following manner:

      1. The notice shall be in writing and hand delivered to the student or sent by certified mail to the student’s last known address, which the student has left with the Registrar’s office.
      2. The notice shall specifically set forth the alleged violation(s) of the College code, rule, regulation, policy or procedure.
      3. The notice shall have attached to it a copy of the Due Process Procedure which is set for the herein.
      4. The notice shall set forth a forewarning of the possible consequences (recommended action) if the student is found to have committed the violation(s).
      5. The notice shall offer the opportunity for a scheduled meeting between the student and the Dean, who issued the notice. This meeting should take place within five days after the student’s request for the meeting in writing.
      6. Neither the student nor the Dean, who issues the notice, shall have the right to be represented by an attorney at this initial conference.
    2. Failure to Appear: If a student fails to appear at the assigned time and date for his/her meeting with the Dean and fails to advise the Dean prior to that scheduled meeting that he/she cannot be present at the assigned time and date, disciplinary action, which may include suspension or termination of the student’s registration at Glen Oaks Community College, may be imposed by the Dean.
    3. Student Conference: At the conference with the Dean, the student shall be informed of (1) the alleged violation of a College code, rule, regulation, policy or procedure, (2) his/her rights under the Due Process Procedure, (3)his/her right to a hearing, (4) his/her right to be represented at that hearing by an attorney, and (5) his/her right to an appeal to a decision made at that hearing, and (6) his/her waiver of the right to a hearing. The Dean shall inquire of a student as to how he/she pleads to the alleged violations. The student may admit the alleged violation of the codes, rules, regulations, policies, procedures; deny the alleged violation; or stand mute. If a student denies the alleged violation or stands mute, the matter shall go to a hearing. If the student admits the allegation, the Dean may impose such discipline as shall be appropriate under the circumstances.
  4. Hearing

    1. Forum: If the student desires a hearing, that hearing shall be before either 1) the Dean handling the situation or before 2) the Due Process Hearing Committee for Violations of Code of Conduct. The student must request the hearing in writing before either 1 or 2 aforementioned. This request must written and submitted to the Dean, who issued the original notice, in writing no longer than five (5) days after the student-Dean conference.

      1. Plea: At the hearing the student may either (1) admit the alleged violation of the codes, rules, regulations, policies, or procedures or (2) deny the alleged violations(s).
      2. Burden of Proof: If the student denies the alleged violation(s), the administration shall have the burden to present such evidence as they may have of the alleged violation(s). Thereafter, the student may present any evidence that he/she desires to disprove the alleged violations(s).
      3. Not Guilty: If the student is found not guilty, no action shall be taken by the administration. The case will be filed in the Student Services Office and no record thereof will be filed in the student’s records.
      4. Guilty: If the student is found guilty, the student shall be notified in writing of the penalty (hearing opinion). Thereafter, the student must comply with the penalty which is imposed.
      5. Per Policy 3.24, there is no grade appeal beyond the Dean of Academics & Extended Learning.

 

July 1992, (Position titles updates 7/2002), revised 9/14/05, 9/17/14

Policy On Campus Unrest, Dissent, And Protest

Policy 3.44
 

Glen Oaks Community College is categorically committed to the concept of individual and group freedom – so long as freedom of thought and/or action does not infringe upon or abuse the freedoms, rights and privileges of other individuals or groups. It is within the context of this commitment that the following statement is issued.

Campus violence already threatens some colleges and universities in a way that could cripple their freedom for many years. Even so we must be mindful of the dangers in laying out inflexible guidelines about unacceptable conduct or in specifying the precise moment when a hazard to the institution is such that civil authority must be called upon.

If one central theme or thread can be extracted from the fabric of campus and student unrest, it would reveal problems occur when communication breaks down or is lacking. Students should not only be given substantial autonomy, but also participate in matters of general educational policy, especially in curricular affairs. Since increased participation contributes to effective decision making, students should serve in a variety of roles on committees. Effective student representation will not only improve the quality of decisions, but also ensure their acceptability to the student body.

Every attempt must be made to establish effective communications so that policy questions, grievances and/or disciplinary problems can be aired by the college community. To this end, violations and/or violators of individual or group freedom will be referred to the President to hear, weigh, evaluate, and recommend as is necessary by the evidence at hand in solving the problem and attaining the objective.

Students must know that they cannot be shielded from the consequences of their behavior, especially when it violates the laws of society at large. They must recognize and respect the rights of other students as they seek rights and privileges for themselves. Threats, violence, coercive disruption of classes and events, and similar acts that tread on the rights of others are intolerable.

Mindful of the concerns of the general public as well as the state legislature the following information, entitled Act #26 of the Public Acts of 1970 of the State of Michigan, is reproduced herein.
 

Act #26 Of The Public Acts Of 1970
AN ACT to provide penalties for certain conduct at public institutions of higher education.

The People of the State of Michigan enact:

Sec. 1. A person is guilty of a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine of not more than $500.00, or by incarceration in the county jail for not more than 30 days, or both:

  1. When the chief administrative officer of a publicly owned and operated institution of higher education, or his designee, notifies the person that he is such officer or designee and the person is in violation of the properly promulgated rules of the institution; and
  2. When the person is in fact in violation of such rules; and
  3. When, thereafter, such officer or designee directs the person to vacate the premises, building or other structure of the institution; and
  4. When the person thereafter willfully remains in or on such premises, building or other structure; and
  5. When, in so remaining therein or thereon, the person constitutes (1) a clear and substantial risk of physical harm or injury to other persons or of damage to or destruction of the property of the institution, or (2) an unreasonable prevention or disruption of the customary and lawful functions of the institution, by occupying space necessary therefore or by use of force or by threat of force.

Sec. 2. A person is guilty of a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine of not less than $200.00 and not more than $1,000.00 or by incarceration in the county jail for not more than 90 days, or both, who enters on the premises, building or other structure of a publicly owned and operated institution of higher education, with the intention to, and therein or thereon does in fact, constitute (a) a clear and substantial risk of physical harm or injury to other persons or of damage to or destruction of the property of the institution, or (b) an unreasonable prevention or disruption of the customary and lawful function of the institution, by occupying space necessary therefore or by use of force or by threat of force.

Sec. 3. This act shall take effect August 1, 1970.

This act is ordered to take immediate effect.

The following act or acts could or might necessitate invoking the trespass law but not be necessarily limited to it:

Destruction of or willful damage to institutional property, grounds or facilities:
Where responsibility can be ascertained, resultant action should evolve through “due process” with local and/or state agencies. Restitution if and when practicable will be considered. Suspension and/or dismissal action may be instituted by proper authority.

Disruption of or undue distractive influences within an organized classroom situation:
Any person or persons when in the opinion of the instructor are not contributing to or are distracting from the educational atmosphere of the class or logical pursuit thereof shall be removed and/or denied access thereto with resultant notification to the Dean of the College and the Dean of Student Services.

Barricading or causing to prevent free access to or egress from any area of the campus including but not exclusive of classrooms, office areas, corridors, stairways, library areas, student center, maintenance and service areas, and roadways:
After ample opportunity and notification by proper authority has been afforded to and no response and/or action resulted there from, physical apprehension and eviction by proper authority shall be affected. Length of time interval from notification to desist from, to notification of proper authority not to exceed three (3) minutes duration. Suspension and/or dismissal action may be instituted by proper authority.

Disruptive action prior to, during or subsequent to an address, performance, event or ceremony:
Any person who interferes with access to or egress from a performance of an address, ceremony, athletic event, or any college sanctioned activity and/or interferes with the continuity of an address, performance or event shall be considered to be preventing or disrupting the customary and lawful function of the institution. Suspension and/or dismissal action may be instituted by proper authority.

Readmission to a class or function after having been removed or suspended there from:
Any student has the absolute right to attend a class in which he is duly enrolled unless he/she has abrogated that right. Final permission for readmission rests with the instructor and/or designated responsible person involved acting in conjunction with the Dean handling the incident. Offenders in this regard should be handled in the same manner as a disruptive or distractive influence.

The right of student dissent or protest within the confines of a building or on the grounds of Glen Oaks Community College:
The right of peaceful dissent and protest should be and will be honored as long as it does not interfere in the rights of others to pursue an education, access to normal working stations, or bring discredit upon the institution and the customary and lawful functions of the institution.

The possession, use of, or causing to bring firearms, dangerous weapons, or explosive agents within the confines of a building or onto the grounds of Glen Oaks Community College is expressly prohibited*.

Any person or persons who are in violation of the above shall, through due process, be subject to suspension and/or dismissal action and will necessitate immediate notification of violation and of proper legal authority of said violation.

Violations of Act #26 of the Public Acts of 1970; The Employees Trespass Law or any of the above rules and regulations of Glen Oaks Community College will result in immediate suspension of said employee and if substantiated through due process by duly constituted legal authority will be grounds for termination of said employment. Student violations will result in suspension and if substantiated, possible expulsion in the future from college classes and events.

*See Resolution and Policy Amendment 3.32.

In the event that it is necessary to inform certain individuals they are in violation of Act #26 of 1970, the following format is to be used:

“My name is ____________________ and I am the designee of the President of Glen Oaks Community College and I am also the agent of the owner of the property upon which you are now standing. I hereby notify you, and each one of you individually, that all persons in this group are in violation of the properly promulgated rules of Glen Oaks Community College, specifically that ____________________________. Any right that you have to use these premises is hereby suspended, whether you are a student or not, and acting on behalf of Glen Oaks Community College and on behalf of the owner of this property, I hereby instruct each and every one of you, whether or not you are a student, to immediately vacate and depart from this property. If you fail to do so, you will immediately be arrested and prosecuted for violating the laws of the State of Michigan relative to trespassing and to conduct upon the property of institutions of higher education.”

Adopted by Board of Trustees 11/18/70, revised 9/14/05, 9/17/14.

Firearms on Campus

Policy 3.45
 

Glen Oaks Community College, in its policy governing campus unrest, specifically prohibits firearms on campus.

The transport and use of any firearm on campus must be performed in accordance with the laws of the State of Michigan.

Adopted by Board of Trustees 11/17/71. Revised 9/19/73. Revised 10/09/200, revised 9/14/05, 9/17/14.

Bulletin Board Policy

Policy 3.46
 

It is the general policy of Glen Oaks Community College to provide its buildings and provide information as a service to the community, employees and students. Some bulletin boards are for institutional use only. These are classroom boards, the boards located in the gymnasium, the Job Opportunity Board, the PTK Board, Financial Aid Board, Testing and Tutoring Center Board and Main Entry Hallway Board.

The College provides general information posting areas. All non-College postings are to be approved and dated by Student Services before being placed on the posting areas. The following are guidelines for approval:

  1. The information or advertisement must not contain statements detrimental to the College or its services and policy.
  2. The information or event must not be in conflict to the Values of the College in its Code of Ethics (Policy 2.15), the Glen Oaks Code of Conduct (Policy 3.42) or the general community values of Glen Oaks Community College District.
  3. Notices or advertisements may be posted for a maximum period of 1 (one) month.
  4. Notices not bearing an official “APPROVED” from the Student Services Office will be removed and discarded.
  5. Approval of posting does not mean that Glen Oaks Community College supports or endorses the product, services or event.

 

July 1992, revised July 2002, revised 9/14/05, reviewed 9/17/14.

Internet/Technology Use Policies

Glen Oaks Community College Responsible Use Of Information Technology Policy

Policy 2.71
 

  1. Purpose
    The College Network incorporates all electronic communication systems and equipment at Glen Oaks Community College (the College”). This Network Acceptable Use Policy (“AUP”) sets forth the standards by which all Users may use the shared College Network. The College Network is provided to support the College and its mission of education, service, and research. Any other uses (other than permitted personal use as discussed below), including uses that jeopardize the integrity of the College Network, the privacy or safety of other Users, or that are otherwise illegal are prohibited. The use of the College Network is a revocable privilege.

    By using or accessing the College Network, Users agree to comply with this AUP and other applicable College policies which may be implemented from time to time, as well as all federal, state, and local laws and regulations. Only Users are authorized to use and/or access the College Network. The term “User” refers to any faculty, staff, or student associated with the College, as well as any other individual with access to computers or other network devices that have been approved by the Network Administrator or Dean of Finance and Administrative Services (DFA) for connection to the College Network. This definition includes, but is not limited to, contractors, visitors, and temporary affiliates.
  2. Principles

    General requirements for acceptable use of the College Network are based on the following principles:

    1. Each User is expected to behave responsibly with respect to the College Network and other Users at all times.
    2. Each User is expected to respect the integrity and the security of the College Network.
    3. Each User is expected to behave in a manner consistent with College’s mission and comply with all applicable laws, regulations, and College policies.
    4. Each User is expected to be considerate of the needs of other Users by making every reasonable effort not to impede the ability of others to use the College Network and show restraint in the consumption of shared resources.
    5. Each User is expected to respect the rights and property of others, including privacy, confidentiality and intellectual property.
    6. Each User is expected to cooperate with the College to investigate potential unauthorized and/or illegal use of the College Network.
    7. Each User is expected to respect the security and integrity of College computer systems and data.
  3. Prohibitions

    Without limiting the general guidelines listed above, unless expressly agreed to by the Network Administrator, the following activities are specifically prohibited:

    1. Users may not attempt to disguise their identity, the identity of their account or the machine that they are using. Users may not attempt to impersonate another person or organization. Users may likewise not misuse or appropriate the College’s name, network names, or network address spaces.
    2. Users may not attempt to intercept, monitor, forge, alter or destroy another User’s communications. Users may not infringe upon the privacy of others’ computer or data. Users may not read, copy, change, or delete another User’s data or communications without the prior express permission of such other User.
    3. Users may not use the College Network in a way that:

      1. disrupts, adversely impacts the security of, or interferes with the legitimate use of any computer, the College Network or any network that the College connects to,
      2. interferes with the supervisory or accounting functions of any system owned or managed by the College, or
      3. take action that is likely to have such effects.

      Such conduct includes, but is not limited to: hacking or spamming, placing of unlawful information on any computer system, transmitting data or programs likely to result in the loss of an individual’s work or result in system downtime, sending “chain letters” or “broadcast” messages to lists or individuals, or any other use that causes congestion of any networks or interferes with the work of others.

    4. Users may not distribute or send unlawful communications of any kind, including but not limited to cyber stalking, threats of violence, obscenity, child pornography, or other illegal communications (as defined by law). This provision applies to any electronic communication distributed or sent within the College Network or to other networks while using the College Network.
    5. Intentional access to or dissemination of pornography by College employees, temporary staff, contractors, or vendors is prohibited unless (1) such use is specific to work-related functions and has been approved the respective manager or (2) such use is specifically related to an academic discipline or grant/research project. This provision applies to any electronic communication distributed or sent within the College Network or to other networks while using the College Network.
    6. Users may not attempt to bypass network security mechanisms, including those present on the College Network, without the prior express permission of the owner of that system. The unauthorized network scanning (e.g., vulnerabilities, post mapping, etc.) of the College Network is also prohibited. For permission to perform network scans, user must receive prior approval by calling the Network Administrator.
    7. Users may not engage in the unauthorized copying, distributing, altering or translating of copyrighted materials, software, music or other media without the express permission of the copyright holder or as otherwise allowed by law. Information on the Digital Millennium Copyright Act can be found at:

      http://www.copyright.gov/legislation/dmca.pdf

      and the Copyright Act at:

      http://www.copyright.gov/title17/.
    8. Except as allowed under the Personal Use Policy or the Policy on Use of College Resources in Support of Entrepreneurial Activities. Users may not use the College Network for private business, commercial or political activities, fundraising, or advertising on behalf of non-College organizations, unlawful activities, or uses that violate other College policies.
    9. Users may not extend or share with public or other users the College Network beyond what has been configured accordingly by Network Administrator. Users are not permitted to connect any network devices or systems (e.g., switches, routers, wireless access points, VPNs, and firewalls) to the College Network without advance notice to and consultation with the Network Administrator. To contact the Network Administrator, users must call Extension 315 and submit an IT request form.
    10. Users are responsible for maintaining minimal security controls on their personal computer equipment that connects to the College Network, including but not limited to: current antivirus software, current system patches, and strong passwords.
    11. Users may not violate any laws or ordinances, including, but not limited to, laws related to copyright, discrimination, harassment, threats of violence and/or export controls.
  4. Review and Penalties

    The College reserves the right to review and/or monitor any transmissions sent or received through the College Network. Access to other transmissions sent or received through the College Network may occur in the following circumstances:

    1. in accordance with generally accepted, network administration practices;
    2. to prevent or investigate any actual or potential information security incidents and system misuse, if deemed necessary by authorized personnel;
    3. to investigate reports of violation of College policy or local, state, or federal law;
    4. to comply with legal requests for information (such as subpoenas and public records requests); and
    5. to retrieve information in emergency circumstances where there is a threat to health, safety, or College property involved

    Penalties for violating this AUP may include:

    1. Restricted access or loss of access to the College Network;
    2. Disciplinary actions against personnel and students associated with the College,
    3. Termination and/or expulsion from the College, and
    4. Civil and/or criminal liability.

    The College, in consultation with its legal counsel, may contact local or federal law enforcement authorities to investigate any matter at its sole discretion.

  5. Policy Updates
    The College reserves the right to update or revise this AUP or implement additional policies in the future. Users are responsible for staying informed about College policies regarding the use of computer and network resources and complying with all applicable policies. The College shall provide notice of any such modifications or amendments by email to the College community. Any such modification shall be effective immediately upon notice being provided regardless of whether subscriber actually reads such notice.

 

Adopted by Board of Trustees April 9, 1997, revised June 9, 1999, January 12, 2000, October 13, 2004, and June 11, 2014.

Glen Oaks Community College Acceptable Internet Use Policy

Policy 3.60
 

  1. Purpose

    Information technology resources, including email and Internet access, are provided for educational purposes. Adherence to the following policy is necessary for continued access to the college’s technology resources. This policy is designed to guide students, faculty, and staff in the acceptable use of computer systems, networks, and other information technology resources at Glen Oaks Community College.
  2. Guiding Principles

    1. Non-public Forum. Information technology at Glen Oaks Community College is a non-public forum. The College reserves the right to restrict access to and the use of information technology resources in a manner consistent with federal and state law.
    2. Creativity Encouraged. The College community is encouraged to make innovative and creative use of information technologies in support of educational, scholarly, and administrative purposes.
    3. Copyrighted Materials. Glen Oaks Community College recognizes the importance of copyright and other protections afforded to the creators of intellectual property. Users are responsible for making use of software and other information technology resources in accordance with copyright and licensing restrictions and applicable College policies. Using information technology resources in a manner violating these protections, or furthering the unauthorized use or sale of protected intellectual property, is prohibited.
    4. Offensive Material. Glen Oaks Community College cannot protect individuals against the receipt of potentially offensive material. Those who use electronic communications occasionally may receive material that they might find offensive. Those who make personal information available about themselves through the Internet or other electronic media may expose themselves to potential invasions of privacy.
    5. Use IT Wisely. Information technology resources are provided to support the College’s scholarly, educational, and administrative activities in fulfilling the mission of the College. Information technology resources are limited, and should be used wisely and with consideration for the rights and needs of others.
    6. Privilege, Not a Right. The use of Glen Oaks Community College computer systems, networks and other information technology resources is a privilege, and not a right. Inappropriate use of such resources may result in suspension or termination of privileges and/or other discipline. The College further reserves the right to monitor Internet use and determine if specific uses are consistent with this Acceptable Use policy, and to deny access to prevent unauthorized or unacceptable activity.
  3. User Responsibilities

    1. Protect your Password. Users are expected to use computer and network resources in a responsible manner. Users should take appropriate precautions to ensure the security of their passwords and prevent others from obtaining access to their computer resources. Convenience of file or printer sharing is not a sufficient reason for sharing computer accounts and passwords.
    2. College Image. Users should remember that information distributed through the College’s information technology resources may be considered a form of publication. Although Glen Oaks Community College does not take responsibility for material issued by individuals, users must recognize that third parties may perceive anything generated at Glen Oaks Community College as in some manner having been produced under Glen Oaks Community College auspices. Accordingly, users are reminded to exercise appropriate language, behavior, and style in their use of information technology resources.
    3. Prohibited Practices. The following behaviors are prohibited while using College information technology resources, including computers and networks owned or operated by Glen Oaks Community College, or to which Glen Oaks Community College is connected:

      1. Modifying system or network facilities, or attempting to crash systems or networks;
      2. Using, duplicating or transmitting copyrighted material without first obtaining the owner’s permission, in any way that may reasonably be expected to constitute an infringement, or that exceeds the scope of a license, or violates other contracts;
      3. Tampering with software protections or restrictions placed on computer applications or files;
      4. Using College information technology resources for personal for-profit purposes;
      5. Impersonating another user or otherwise falsifying a user name in email;
      6. Degrading or disrupting the network, hindering access to the network, or otherwise excessively using resources in a manner which effectively denies service to other users;
      7. Sending chain letters, junk mail, “spam,” or other similar types of broadcast messages or messages that use pyramid schemes to distribute communications to an exponentially growing collection of recipients;
      8. Sending mail that is deliberately designed to interfere with proper mail delivery or access;
      9. Using information technology resources in a manner that is disruptive of the workplace or educational purpose of the College, or which otherwise hinders the effectiveness of the institution;
      10. Using information technology resources to access, store, or transmit pornographic or obscene material in violation of Michigan criminal laws, including, but not limited to Michigan obscenity laws MCLA 752.361-752.374 and other Michigan statutes and cases concerning obscenity;
      11. Sending messages that are malicious or that a reasonable person would find to be harassing or threatening;
      12. Accessing another person’s computer account without permission. Users may not supply false or misleading data, or improperly obtain an others password to gain access to computers or network systems, data or information. Obtaining access to an account name or password through the negligence or oversight of another is considered to be a specifically prohibited use;
      13. Intentionally introducing computer viruses, worms, or other rogue programs into information technology resources that belong to, are licensed to, or are leased by Glen Oaks Community College or others;
      14. Physically damaging information technology resources;
      15. Using, or encouraging others to use, information technology resources in any manner that would violate this or other College policies or any applicable state or federal law; and
      16. Falsely reporting or accusing another of conduct that violates this policy, without a good faith basis for such an accusation.
    4. Incidental Use. Ability to access computing resources does not, by itself, imply authorization to do so. Users are responsible for learning what authorizations are necessary and for obtaining them from the appropriate supervisor before proceeding. Incidental use is defined as occasional, limited, and without significant cost in time or college resources. Supervisors are expected to use professional judgment to determine whether an employee’s personal use is incidental. Incidental use of College-owned computer systems for personal purposes is permitted if:

      1. Use occurs outside of the employee’s work schedule;
      2. Use does not interfere with work being performed by another employee;
      3. Use is not for pay or profit;
      4. Use does not consume excessive supplies— as determined by a supervisor, employees may be asked to replace supplies consumed beyond an incidental level;
      5. Use does not violate software licensing agreements;
      6. Use does not expose confidential or personnel information to others who should not have access to such information.

  4. Policy Administration

    1. College Access to Your Files. The College encourages all members of its community to use electronic resources in a manner that is respectful of others.

      Generally, the College will not make the contents of electronic mail available to those other than the originator and intended recipient. While respecting users’ privacy to the fullest extent possible, however, the College reserves the right to examine any computer files. The College reserves this right for bona fide purposes, including, but not limited to:

      1. Enforcing policies against harassment and threats to the safety of individuals;
      2. Protecting against or limiting damage to College information technology resources;
      3. Complying with a court order, subpoena or other legally enforceable discovery request;
      4. Investigating and preventing the posting of proprietary software or electronic copies of texts, data, media or images in disregard of copyright, licenses, or other contractual or legal obligations or in violation of law;
      5. Safeguarding the integrity of computers, networks, hardware, software and data;
      6. Preserving information and data;
      7. Upgrading or maintaining information technology resources;
      8. Cooperating with law enforcement authorities in reporting and investigating suspected criminal activity.
    2. Servers. All servers must be approved by the College. Root access must be given to the Dean of Finance and Administrative Services or designee for all servers on the Glen Oaks Community College network.
    3. Terminating Your Use of Computers. The College may suspend or terminate the use of its computers and network systems when presented with evidence of a user’s violation of College policies, or federal or state laws, or when it is necessary to do so to protect the College against potential legal liability. The College reserves the right to limit access to its information technology resources, and to remove or limit access to material stored on College information technology resources.
    4. Disciplinary Action. All users are expected to conduct themselves consistent with these responsibilities. Abuse of computing privileges may subject the user to disciplinary action as established by applicable College policies and/or collective bargaining agreements.
    5. Bound by Public Law. The College and users must recognize that all members of the College community are bound by federal and state laws pertaining to civil rights, harassment, copyright, security and other statutes governing use of electronic media. This policy does not preclude enforcement under such laws.
  5. Indemnification and Warranties

    1. Glen Oaks Community College makes no warranties of any kind whether expressed or implied, for the computer services it provides.
    2. Glen Oaks Community College assumes no responsibility for any direct or indirect damages arising from the user’s connection to the Internet. The College is not responsible for the accuracy of information found on the Internet, but rather merely facilitates the accessing and dissemination of information through its systems. Unless the College expressly authors content, it has no editorial control over the content distributed or disseminated on the network and users are solely responsible for any material that they access and disseminate.
    3. Users hereby agree to indemnify and hold Glen Oaks Community College and its officers, Trustees, employees and agents harmless for any loss, damage, expense or liability resulting from any claim, action or demand, arising out of or related to the users’ use of Glen Oaks Community College owned technology resources and network, including reasonable attorney fees. Such claims shall include, without limitation, those based on trademark or service mark infringement, trade name infringement, copyright infringement, dilution, tortuous interference with contract or prospective business advantage, unfair completion, defamation, unlawful discrimination or harassment, rights of publicity, and invasion of privacy.
  6. Reporting Violations

    Allegations of student conduct that is believed to violate this Acceptable Use policy should be reported in writing to the Assistant Dean of Students and Community Services. Allegations of faculty or staff conduct that is believed to violate this Acceptable Use Policy should be reported in writing to the Dean of Finance and Administrative Services or designee. To ensure the fairness of any proceedings that may follow a reported violation, the individual filing the report should not discuss or provide copies of the allegations to others.

 

Adopted 5/14/08, revised 9/17/14.

Sixty students in the inaugural St. Joseph CountyEarly Middle College will participate in the first annual EMC Bootcamp, August 15 through 17, on the campus of Glen Oaks Community College.

 Since Early Middle College is a bridge between high school and college for the students, the EMC Bootcamp is a chance for students to become more familiar with the expectations of college along with the facilities and resources available for achieving success in the program.

“This is going to be an exciting, educational and fun time for the students,” said Anita Schlabach, EMC coordinator. “There are 15 students who were in the pilot program which began last year and they will be joining the new cohort as part of the boot camp. This event is really a “Welcome Bash and College Orientation” all in one. By bringing all the students in the program together, we are building a networking support system for them.”

Students will learn success strategies to help them cope in college classes. These include time management skills, basic college orientation and getting familiar with the new EMC handbook. They will also gain knowledge on how to effectively transfer and transition to four-year institutions.

“If the students are successful, the program will be successful,” said Schlabach. “We are surrounding them with the support they will need. Whether it is how to read their schedules, understanding how to purchase or rent books from the bookstore, or learning where their classes are—walking them through the process is important.”

Charlotte O’Conner, academic coach and coordinator of learning services in Student Life at The University of Michigan, will hold a special presentation “Choices of Successful Students” for the students on the opening day of the program.

Daily hours for the boot camp are: Monday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., with parents attending from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.; and Tuesday and Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

 

 

 

Study Abroad Trip 2018

Scenic mountain landscape of Peru.

Peru

 

Featuring: Lima, Cuzco, Sacred Valley, Machu Picchu, Puerto Maldonado, and Amazon Lodge. For more information or to register please visit the Education First website. Or contact your tour host Professor Michael Northrop via our Contact Form.

Open to Students, Staff and the Community

 

FACULTY

 Gerald Barkley – Professor Math/Science
AS, Glen Oaks; BS, Western Michigan University; MS, Western Michigan University
 Rebecca Burch – Professor Psychology/Student Success
BA and MA, Western Michigan University
 Pam Carrel – Professor
Nursing
LPN, Glen Oaks Community College; AS, Southwestern Michigan College; Nursing Home Administration Certificate, MSU; BSN, Goshen College; MSN, Goshen College
 Kevin Conner – Professor Information Technology
AASB, Glen Oaks Community College; BAS, Davenport Univ.; MS, Capella University Michigan
 Michelle Converse – Instructor Nursing
ASN, Ivy Tech Community College; BSN, Indiana Wesleyan University; MSN-Ed, Indiana Wesleyan University
 Jim Deroshia – Instructor
Automotive Technology
Hydraulic maintenance and repair certificate, Vickers Hydraulic School; Computer Support Technician Certificate/AAS, Glen Oaks Community College
 Kevin Gave – Professor  English
  BA, Kalamazoo College; MA, Western Michigan University
 Alyse Gordon – Instructor  Welding
  Welding Certificate
 Dr. Ren Hartung – Professor  Science
BA, Albion College; PhD, University of South Carolina School of Medicine
 Lori Hatfield – Professor  English 
AA, Kalamazoo Valley Community College; BA, Thomas Edison; MA, National University; Course-work, Adrian College & Michigan State Univ.
 Jeffery Hucko – Professor  Biology
BS, University of Kentucky; MS, Eastern Kentucky University; MS, University of Louisiana at Lafayette
 Dr. Maria Jose Rodriguez Mora – Professor
 Microbiology
MS, Universidad Simon Bolivar in Caracas, Venezuela; PhD, University of Louisiana
 Reid Leaverton – Instructor
Instructor Agricultural Technology
Caterpillar Equipment Mechanic, Reedley College; CAT/John Deere training
 Dr. Lester Keith – Professor  Business Administration
AA, AS, San Antonio College; BBA and MBA, University of Texas at San Antonio; DBA, Doctor of Business Administration, Argosy University, Sarasota; Vocationally certifiable
 William Lederman – Professor  Director of Nursing
LPN, Glen Oaks Community College; ADN, New Mexico State University; BSN, Purdue University; MA, Western Michigan University; MSN, CNL-C (Certified Clinical Nurse Leader), Goshen College; Vocationally certifiable
 Susan Louis – Instructor  Nursing
LPN, RN, Kalamazoo Valley Community College; BSN, Western Michigan University; MSN, Western Michigan University
 Michelle McNamara – Professor  Communications
AA, Glen Oaks Community College; BAS, Davenport University; MA, Business, Spring Arbor University; MA, Communications, Spring Arbor University; Vocationally certifiable
 Carol Naccarato – Instructor  Director of Allied Health/Medical Assisting
BSN, Spring Arbor; MFA, University of Notre Dame; BFA, Siena Heights; AASN, Glen Oaks Community College; MA Cert., Glen Oaks Community College; Practical Nurse Certificate, RN, CMA (AAMA), Glen Oaks Community College
 Nicholas Nollinger – Instructor
Computer-Aided Drafting and Design
 BS, Eastern Illinois University
 Michael Northrop – Professor  Art
  BM, Olivet College; MFA, Western Michigan University
 Steven Proefrock – Professor  Physical Education
BS, Central Michigan University; MA, Eastern Kentucky University
 Steve Ryno – Professor  English 
BA, Western Michigan University; M. Ed. and Secondary Teaching Certificate, Aquinas College; MA in English, Western Michigan University; Additional study, Western Michigan University
 Michael Sandelin – Professor  Mathematics
  BS, Taylor University; MA, Miami University
 Sarah Simmons – Professor  Science
  BA, Albion College; MS, University of Michigan
 Cheryl VanderPloeg – Instructor
Nursing
 AASN, KVCC; BSN, WMU; BSN, Goshen College; MSN, Bethel College
 Lori Van Zoeren – Instructor Nursing
Nursing Diploma, Bronson School of Nursing; BS – Clayton College; BSN – Ferris State University; MSN – Ferris State University
 Linda Walker – Instructor  Graphic Arts
  BA Studio Art – Northern Illinois University
 Chad Worthington – Professor  Psychology
BA, Trinity International University; MA, North Central University; MA, Western Michigan University

 

  Annual Faculty

 Robert Click – Instructor
Business
 A.A., Macomb Comm. College; B.A., Aquinas College; P.D.D., University of Michigan; M.B.A., Suffolk University
 Marlene Livingston – Instructor
 Allied Health
LPN, Grand Rapids Community College; ADN, Grace College School of Nursing
 Christopher Mundie – Instructor
Communications
A.S., Delta College; B.S., Central Michigan University; M.A., Central Michigan University 

 

Administration

Dr. David H. Devier President
BA, Ohio Northern University; MA, Kent State University; Ph.D, The Ohio State University
 Diane Zinsmaster Executive Associate to President and Board of Trustees
Coursework, Glen Oaks Community College
 Paul Aivars Director of Business Outreach and Services
BS, Western Michigan University; MA, Spring Arbor University
 Valorie Juergens  Executive Director of Communications and Marketing
  BS, MEd, The University of Toledo
 Pam Hughes  Executive Director, Glen Oaks Foundation
 Chuck Frisbie   Director of Institutional Innovation
AA, Glen Oaks Community College; BS and MA Western Michigan University

 

Academic Affairs/Instruction

 Dr. Patricia Morgenstern
Dean of Academics and Extended Learning
BA and MA, Michigan State University; Ph.D., Nova Southeastern Univ.-Fort Lauderdale, FL.
 Irene Elksnis-Geisler Interim Assistant Dean of Academics
 BA, U of M; MA, Spring Arbor; MALS, Eastern; Ph.D, WMU
  Shaphan Lavinghouse Director, Testing & Tutoring Center
 AS, Mississippi Gulf Coast Comm. College; BS & MS, University of Southern Mississippi
 Julie Cottin ECM Administrator
BS, BBA, MA, Western Michigan University
 Betsy Susan Morgan  Library Director
BA, Bryn Mawr College; MA, Western Michigan; MLS, University of Pittsburgh
 Dr. Tammy Russell 
Title III Program Director and Director of Institutional Effectiveness and Research
  BA, Hope College; MSW, Western Michigan University; Ph.D., Western Michigan University
 Cindy Batten
Administrative Assistant to the Dean of Academics and Extended Learning
 Amanda Yearling
Institutional Research Assistant
 AA, Kellogg Community College; BA, Robert B. Miller College; MA, Wayne State University
 Jonathan Anthony   Student Success Coach
Assoc. Liberal Arts, Glen Oaks Community College; BS, Western Michigan University; Master of Public Health, University of Michigan

 

College Operations

Bruce Zakrzewski
Dean of Finance and Administrative Services
  BBA, Notre Dame
 Sharon Nichols  Controller
  BBA, Davenport University
 Jennifer Dodson  Sr. Accountant
AAS, Southwestern Michigan College; BS, Ferris State University
Larry Diekman  Director of Building and Grounds
Michigan State Police Academy, Coursework – Glen Oaks Community College and Lansing Community College
 Larry Mericle
Custodial Supervisor
  Coursework, Glen Oaks Community College
 Trista Nelson 
Systems Support Specialist
AGS, Glen Oaks Community College; BA, Western Michigan University; MLIS, Wayne State University
 Jesse Salazar IT Director/Datatel Administrator
AAB, Glen Oaks Community College; BSME, Universidad Santiago Mariño, Venezuela
 Candy Bohacz   Human Resources Coordinator
  AB, Glen Oaks Community College; BBA, Western Michigan
 Jamie Bennett-Yesh Director of Human Resources
AB, Glen Oaks Community College; BBA, Robert B. Miller College
 Courtney Ivan
Athletic Director/Director of Fitness and Wellness
  BS, Olivet College; MEd, Mercyhurst University
 Eric Connelly   Website Administrator
AAS, LPN Certificate, Computer Technician Certificate, Glen Oaks Community College
 Evan Dembskey Network Administrator
 MA, University of South Africa; METCH, Tshwane University of Technology
 Lauren Sterling Communications Assistant
AGS, Kellogg Community College; BS, Trine University; MSW, Western Michigan University

 

  Student Services

Tonya Howden Dean of Students
BA, Fort Hays State University, Kansas; MSEd, Capella University
 Amy Young Registrar
  BA, Cornerstone University
 Adrienne Skinner  Director of Admissions
  BA, Western Michigan University; MS, Walden University
 Anne Springsteen, LPC, NCC TRIO SSS Project Director, Student Support Services
AA, Southwestern Michigan College; BS, MA, Western Michigan University
 Jaime Raifsnider TRIO SSS Project Advisor, Student Support Services
AB, Kalamazoo Valley Community College, BAS, Western Michigan University
 David Victor
 Admissions Representative
Course work, Glen Oaks Community College; BS, Wayne State University
 Hannah Fries
TRIO SSS Project Advisor, Student Support Services
Communications New Media Coordinator, Title III
  BA, Western Michigan University; MA, Spring Arbor University
 Jean Zimmerman   Director of Financial Aid/Scholarships
  BS, University of Illinois
 Leanne Barnell
Assistant Financial Aid Director & Academic Advisor
BS-Criminal Justice/Psychology, BS-Social Studies Education, Trine University; MS, Marygrove College-Detroit; Certified in Psychology/Sociology
 Anita Lopez Schlabach  Early Middle College Advisor
  BA, Spring Arbor; AA, Wesston Mennonite College
 Lyle Raven, LLP
Director of Student Success and Advising
BS, Western Michigan University; MRE, Grand Rapids Baptist Seminary; MA, Western Michigan
 Benjamin Fries  Student Success Advisor
BS, Indiana University – South Bend; MSL, Trine University
 Karen Webber
Occupational Student Success Coordinator/Student Support Specialist
AA, Glen Oaks; BA, Spring Arbor University; MSW, Western Michigan University

 

On-Campus Partners

 Capstone On-Campus Management – Devier Suites
 April Yost Director of Student Housing
 BA, Albion College; MA, Western Michigan University
 Chad McConnell
 Assistant Director of Student Housing
 BA, Saginaw Valley State University
Michigan Sate University
 Mark Trowbridge
 Program Director
 BS, Michigan State University
Trine University
 Kelly Chris
 Education Center Director –
College of Graduate and Professional Studies
BS, Trine University 
 Amber Titus
 Regional Director of Admissions

 

Support Staff

Ken Anway Custodian
Coursework, Glen Oaks Community College
Mark Arrington Custodian
 Bernice Crocker
Executive Assistant to the Director of Allied
Health/Medical Assisting
  Coursework, Kaplan University and Rosmussen College
 Larry Evans  Maintenance Assistant
 Judy Fetch   Library Technician
  AAS, Ferris State University; Coursework, Glen Oaks
 Ric (Ken) Gilson   Distance Learning Clerk
BA, Grand Rapids Baptist College; BS, Calvin College; M.Ed, Western Michigan University
Clarice Green
Executive Assistant to the Assistant Dean of Enrollment Services/Registrar and Director of Admissions
AB, Glen Oaks Community College; BS, Spring Arbor University
 Tina Guijosa 
Staff Technician – Tutoring & Testing Center
  Coursework – Glen Oaks Community College
 Stacie Hart   Accounts Receivable Assistant
AB, Glen Oaks Community College; BS, Trine University
 Theresa Hawkins   Registration and Records Clerk
AB, Glen Oaks Community College; Coursework, Franklin University
 Lynne Holtz  Staff Technician-Tutoring & Testing Center
 Steven Hoover
Maintenance Assistant
 Fran Howard
Executive Assistant to the Director of Nursing
  AASB, Glen Oaks Community College
 Angelina Lau
Custodian
Coursework, Glen Oaks Community College
 Amanda Ludwig Custodian/Maintenance Helper
 Tom Miller  Maintenance Assistant
 Tonya Miller  Media/Computer/Library Assistant
AASB, AB, Management/Marketing Certificate, Glen Oaks; Coursework, Western Governors Univ.
 Barb Murk 
Executive Assistant to Director of Financial Aid
AA, Davenport College; AGS, Glen Oaks Community College; BS, Spring Arbor
 Phuong Nguyen   Maintenance Assistant
AAST, Automotive Service and Automotive Technician Certificates, Glen Oaks Community College
 Coni Nickles
Computer Lab Assistant
AAS – Glen Oaks, Certificate: Network Administration Technician and Computer Support Technician
 Kathleen Patrick   Exec. Asst. to Athletic Director
  Business studies coursework, Glen Oaks
 Misty Sanderson 
Executive Assistant to the Assistant Dean of Enrollment
Services & Registrar
  AASB, Glen Oaks Community College
Carolyn Schwemer  Custodian
 Lori Templin 
Evening Receptionist/Switchboard Operator
  Coursework, Glen Oaks Community College; Western Michigan University; Kalamazoo Valley Community College
 Rachel Templin  Financial Aid Clerk
  BA, Hope College
 Barbara Thole   Accounts Payable/Payroll Asst.
Business Administration diploma, Argubright Business College; AAS, Glen Oaks
 Katelyn Thornton Document Management Scanning Technician
Coursework, Glen Oaks Community College
 Robin Weekly  Day Receptionist/Switchboard Operator
  Coursework, Glen Oaks Community College
 Dawn Wood
Asst. to the Dean of Teaching and Learning/Faculty
Diploma, Int’l Business College; Assoc. Degree, Davenport University; AASB, AASAH, Health Insurance Coder/Biller Certificate, Glen Oaks

Glen Oaks Community College is looking for alumni and friends of the college who are interested in helping to establish an Alumni and Friends Association.

“We are looking to get people together who share a common bond — appreciation for the college,” said Pam Hughes, director of the Glen Oaks Community College Foundation. “The idea is for the group to gather for local or regional events three to four times a year. Suggestions for activities could range from having speakers at coffee shops to offering daytrips to regional points of interest or sporting events, attending signature events such as ArtPrize, in Grand Rapids, or traveling to Chicago for sight-seeing, discovering museums or holiday shopping. The possibilities are endless.”

“As a community college, we are somewhat different in how we define alumni,” said Hughes.   “Taxpayer dollars are vital to the college and we consider alumni as anyone who has taken one or more courses. We look forward to working with alumni and friends of the college of all ages.  Once we have a planning committee together, their ideas will guide the direction for the group,” said Hughes.

Alumni and friends interested in sharing their ideas and providing direction for the group should plan to attend one of two planning gatherings scheduled for Tuesday, August 23 at 5 p.m. at Great Lakes Chocolate and Coffee in Sturgis, or on Wednesday, August 24 at 5 p.m. at L.A.’s Coffee Cafe in Three Rivers, or you may contact Hughes at (269) 294-4384.

 

Professors Emeritus

 James Cook – Professor
Computer-Aided Design & Drafting
 Richard Cripe – Professor Counselor
 Harvey Gordon – Professor
Art
 David Gosling (D) – Professor
Biology
 Robert Gray (D) – Professor  Music/Data Processing
 Daryl Herrmann – Professor  Communications
 Janell Lederman – Professor
Nursing
 James Martin (D) – Professor
Data Processing/Electronics
 Wayne Moss – Professor  Science
 JoAnne Purlee – Professor  Nursing
 Jeanne Reed – Professor
Social Science, Humanities and Study Abroad
 Richard Schlimgen – Professor  Counselor
 Kenneth Schuler (D) – Professor  Physical Education
 David G. Smith (D) – Professor  Business
 Sharon Smith – Professor  Business
 Thomas Soper – Professor
 English/Physical Education
 Bernard Swartz – Professor  Mathematics
 Leland Thornton – Professor  History
 Barbara Timby – Professor  Nursing 
 Donald Van Zuilen (D) – Professor  Science
 Lucy Zimmerman – Professor  English
 Glenn Oxender  President
 Dr. Philip Ward   President
 Dr. Gary Wheeler  President

 

Business & Community Services

Glen Oaks Community College offers a variety of training and continuing education programs. These include workforce development and corporate training to all businesses, online ed2go six week programs, and continuing education. Included is an assessment for training needs and instruction at the facility or at the college. A mobile lab with 15 laptop computers may be utilized on site or use the computer lab at the Business Development Center at Glen Oaks.

The Business Development Center at Glen Oaks has two computer training labs, a kitchen, and a 75-seat auditorium. The Dresser Business Development Auditorium is a large training room that can be arranged in many different seating configurations. The auditorium is named after local benefactors Ray and Gretchen Dresser.

 

The Business Development Center at Glen Oaks has two computer training labs, a kitchen, and a 75-seat auditorium. The Dresser Business Development Auditorium is a large training room that can be arranged in many different seating configurations. The auditorium is named after local benefactors Ray and Gretchen Dresser.

The Business Services team has partnerships with training organizations, colleges and universities so the best subject matter expert is available. Examples of training programs are: continuous quality improvement, team building skills, problem solving, supervisory skills, project management, customer service, statistical process control, geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GDT), Lean Manufacturing, ISO 9001: 2015, and more. Online career training programs are available through ed2go for a number of fields. An example might be pharmacy technician training to pass the national qualification test. For more information: www.gatlineducation.com/gocc

One of the benefits of a community college is the flexibility of customized training in cases where “off the shelf” training does not meet the need. A Glen Oaks representative and company official will review company training needs, picking what is needed in an ala cart manner, with a goal of making sure the learning outcome meets the needs of the business.

The Business Services Office collaborates with the Southwest Michigan First, St. Joseph County Economic Development Corporation (EDC), Three Rivers Area Chambers of Commerce, Sturgis Chamber of Commerce, Michigan WORKS!, and other groups and individuals interested in the economic development and the well-being of the Glen Oaks service area.

Online ed2go training features over 300 instruction programs. These six week courses begin each month. The program includes 12 lessons at a reasonable cost. Examples of ed2go courses are Speed Spanish, Digital Photography, Computer Programs or Creating a Webpage. For more information go to www.ed2go.com/gocc

Continuing Education has returned to Glen Oaks with CE classes like Watercolors for Beginners and Landscaping. These classes may be as short as one 3-hour session at minimum cost. The college is always open to course suggestions. Short-term computer classes may be 9-12 hours and held over several sessions. Participants enjoy the friendly and hassle-free opportunity to learn about today’s computer programs, including working at their own speed with no pressure.

Contact the Workforce Development office to learn of the latest seminars and courses at 269-467-9945 or 888-994-7819. Also check the latest offerings in the Glen Oaks class schedule or college website: www.glenoaks.edu/businessindustry

 

Nora Hagen House makes excellent business meeting site

A street view picture of the Nora Hagen House exterior and display sign.

On the east edge of the college campus is the Nora Hagen House, a renovated farmhouse which was an endowment of the family farm made to the college by Ms. Nora Hagen. This facility houses a conference room, kitchen catering facilities, and overnight accommodations for visiting speakers. The house provides a beautiful setting, conducive to small group seminars and business planning meetings. Businesses may make rental arrangements by contacting the college.

Fitness/Wellness Center

The Glen Oaks Fitness/Wellness Center is a student-based facility that also caters to the needs of the community. The Center is equipped with a variety of cardio equipment as well as state of the art weight machines and free weights. Students may enroll in fitness classes for credit, or choose to utilize the student

One male physically spotting another male who is doing squat exercises with a weight bar.

membership and work one on one with Center staff to develop a personally designed workout plan.

The Center employs a highly trained staff that is friendly, knowledgeable, and prepared to provide assistance to all Center students and patrons. The Center operates between the hours of 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Fridays, and 8 a.m. to noon on Saturdays. (Spring/Summer hours are subject to change with college schedule.) All students enrolled on at least a part-time basis are able to use the Center for no additional charge as Fitness/Wellness Center membership is included in student fees.

The Fitness/Wellness Center’s community usage fees are competitive with others in the area. Please check the Glen Oaks website for the most up-to-date pricing and schedule. Additional questions about the Center can be directed to the Fitness/Wellness Center at (269) 294-4307 or toll free at (888) 994-7818 extension 307.

Online Distance Learning

A female student with headphones on looking at her computer screen and manipulating the computer mouse.

Glen Oaks Community College has Online Distance Learning to meet the needs of learners who cannot or prefer not to attend traditionally-scheduled courses. The courses are delivered using CANVAS, an Internet-based online learning platform.

Distance Learning courses are conveniently available on the Internet 24 hours a day/7 days a week and provide the flexibility to work within unique schedules without the need to come to campus regularly. Students are able to work and study in a relaxed atmosphere and use a variety of educational technologies to meet course requirements.

If you are looking for a specific course and can’t find it at Glen Oaks Community College, you can check out the MCO — a project of the Michigan Community College Association that distributes online class offerings from member colleges to students with support services provided by the host college. To view the selection of web-based courses being offered, go to: micolleges.org.

For more information about Glen Oaks Community College’s Distance Learning courses, as well as MCO classes, call the Distance Learning Center office at (269) 294-4306, or toll-free at: (888) 994-7818, ext. 306 or via our Contact Form.

Glen Oaks announces Winter 2016 scholars

Centreville, MI — Glen Oaks Community College announces its outstanding scholars for the Winter 2016 Semester. Students on the President’s Honor Roll achieved a grade point average of 3.75-4.0. Students on the Dean’s Honor Roll achieved a grade point average of 3.5-3.74. The students are listed alphabetically according to their towns of residency.

President’s Honor Roll

Michigan Residents
Bronson

Thomas Littlefield, Rayshell Losinski, Clare Mayes, Cathy Moore, Breanna Ritter, Kelcy Sikorski

Burlington

Devon Watson

Burr Oak

DeVonna Allison, Brandon Hernandez, Bethany Little, Lance Ochampaugh, Clinton Pappas, Stephanie Torres-Murguia

Cassopolis

Jamie Barrett

Centreville

Isaiah Bohm, Samantha Bovee, Kayla Brown, Adam Carpenter, John Clark, Rebecca Clementz, Kathryn Gage, Bailey Kelley, Alexander Lafler, Caleb Miller, Kolvin  Miller, Becca Riess, Bethany Riess, Michael Riess, Joshua Schwartz, Courtney Stauffer, Noah Stauffer

Coldwater  

Brendan Behnke, Jonah Klingler

Colon

Dillon Baker, Emily Condon, Morgan Czajkowski, Jane Eckert, Coni Nickles, Christel Schwartz, Kathleen Shackleton, Chase Tomlinson

Constantine

McKenna Bowdish, Rachel Dingess, Nicole Erickson, Kaitlyn Gross, Jonathan Harrison,  Zachery King, Lauren Kline, David Martinez Villeda, Michael McCuaig, Brianna O’Brien, Kallie Sears, Randy Waterman

Ishpeming

Nicholas Bordine

Jones

Brian Hutchinson, Lauren Vanderhoof

Kalamazoo

Brett Bashaw, Modeste Mukaneza

Leondias

Deane Shapley

Marcellus

Erika Eggleston, Jessica Glass

Mendon

Michael Campbell, Samantha Griffith, Ciera Haynes, Alexander Heckman, Mary Leighton, Danielle Parsons, Cassandra Plummer, Dylan Plummer, Hannah Rice, Garrett Russell, Angela Smith, Lara Speece, Megan Wilson

Sherwood

Ronny Moyer

Sturgis

Adam Barkley, Taylor Clark, Sarah Cline, Cierra Conklin, Michelle Deam, Arielle Dejnowski, Vanessa Delgado, Madison Eazsol, Jared Eichorn, Morgan Fletcher, Timothy Freehling, Lizeth Garcia, Jacob Gauthier, Jeremy Gooch, Ashlee Holtz, Chloe Hunt, Ammara Kanjanayothee, Grant Little, Ethan Long,  Susana Luna-Perez, Taylor Mayo, Hannah Mayuiers, Janel Meese, Hans Miller, Ashley Milliman, Daniel Monahan, William Murphy, Johanna Lee Orca-Handyside, Gerardo Ortega, Monica Picker, Morgan Pueschel, Jessenia Rawson, Amanda Ritchie, Viviana Rubio, Haley Schlabach, Rebecca Schuler, Elisha Schultz, Cassidy Sheehan, Katlyn Taylor, Casey Tesman, Rebecca Thrasher, Mathew Whitsel, Coleman Zarza, Lesli Zorn

Three Rivers

Alyssa Arrington, Rain Barnes, Steven Bartolameolli, Victoria Bass, Taylor Batten, Emmalee Benson, Alyssa Bradley, Samantha Bruley, Michael Castillo, Keny Chapman, Leah Crooks, Gillian Cupp, Kylee Davidson, Andrea Dear, Valarie DeBoer, Brandy Deleeuw, Michaela Freeman, Hannah Frye, Pamella Frye, Lisa Harrison, Jared Hughes, Ethan Johansen, Carolyn Kirchner, Alyssa Kramer, Rebecca Lorenz, Lezlie Lull, Arlene Mathews, Teah Mayer, MacKenzie Mehaney, Nikita Mehaney, Collin Meyer, Julie Milliman, Matthew Moreland, Meryn Mostrom, Stephen Murphy, Matthew Paavola, Alexander Poff, Nickalas Randall, Adam Reed, Tatum Rice, Paige Schoon, Megan Southland, Katelyn Sussdorf, Robert Tomlinson, Jordan VanOss, Hannah Wilkins, Leiana Wonders, Austin Wright

Union

Chloe Cornwell

Union City

Grant Gay, Carley Robertson, Rachel Wing

Vandalia

Samantha Mulder

Vicksburg

Haleigh Jensen

White Pigeon

Tena Burkey-Zimmerman, Raul Carmona, Jennifer Elayek,  Bethany Hagner, Brittany Harman, Elizabeth Holmes, Tiffany Mercer, Meelan Patel, Kloe Pettit, Zane Shoppell, Demorous Wickey

Indiana Residents

Howe   

Aaron Hooley

Shipshewana  

Sidney Byrkett

International Residents
Sao Paulo   

Isabella Palhoni de Lima

DEAN’s Honor Roll

Michigan Residents

Bronson

Stacie Cleland, Kristen Kline, Kelsie Letendre, David Roderick, Kathleen Wetzel

Burr Oak

Marlena Wells

Centreville

Andrea Bell, Matthew Clementz, Jonah Kirby, Jasmine Long, Keyara Long, Ralph Marquez

Coldwater  

Erik Agar, Mercedes Locklin

Colon

Bailey Fisher, Kayla Haskin, Jenafer Lance, Sephanie Lester, Megan Martin

Constantine

Rachel Arnett, Vanessa Drust, Jacob Emerick, Kennedy Espinoza, Malorie Hulse, Chantelle McMillin, Tina Pusateri, Kodie Schneidmiller, Roopa Singh,  Katie Wagner

Edwardsburg

Trey Harness

Jones

Haley Frizzell

Kalamazoo

Robert Murangira

Lawrence

Erica Vrhel

Leondias

Karyn Scheffler

Marcellus

Meredith Glass

Mendon

Zachary Cipriano, Kendra Classen, Alexis Leighton, Olivia Leighton, Calvin Oke, Abby Ray, Taylor Schmidt, Tianna Sears, Theresa Yoder, Megan Zinsmaster

Portage

Kyle Kuzmick

Sherwood

Jalen Boes, Ronny Moyer, Abigail Stoll

Sturgis

Teresa Atkison, Lenore Borden, Alexandra Brazo, Miranda Bystry, Mariah DeCloedt, Rodrigo Delgado, Ashley Dodson, Ramiro Flores, Shae Hamlin, Jennifer Harper, Charen Keesling, Molly McLain, Makenzie Miller, Sheila Miller, Raul Morales, Rebecca Mulkey, Sarah Quirin, Tyler Roussey, Carrie Scholten, Elijah Schwartz,  Ashley Stewart, Ashley Stickney, Leslie Tullos,  Mark Walker, Storm Walter
Tekonsha 

Hailey Rivard

Three Rivers

Rachael Arrington,  Jennifer Barner, Joshua Barner, Myia Black, Mary Bright, Jessica Carlton, Amber Chapman, Travis Coop,  Shenda Coy, Mihret Craft, Audrey DePierre, Nathan Eldridge, Lindsey Evans, Kaitlyn First, McKayla Gascho, Alyssa Hall, Alyssa Hull-Nerad, Angelina Lau, William Lautenschleger, Parker Mostrom, Kristina Phillips, Kylee Ruedger, Ashley Smith, Roy Stafford, Sidney Stokes, Alison Stutesman, Julia Sutter, Tami Thomas, Emma Thompson, Victoria Wheeler

Union

Dillon Begley

Union City

Skyler Herman

White Pigeon

Hannah Carr, Nicolette Kershner, Desiree Rachwal, Julieanna Suszko, Kari Tetzloff

Indiana Residents:

Howe   

Aaron Hooley

Shipshewana  

Tara Caldwell, Corina Hochstetler, Lauren Lamb

Transfer Advising/Transfer Partnerships

Transfer Advising

Glen Oaks Community College offers courses that are helpful toward the achievement of many four-year programs of study. Frequently students can secure a two-year associate degree on the way to a four-year bachelor’s degree. Transfer curriculum guides are available for the most popular programs and schools. Transfer guides, which list courses at Glen Oaks that will transfer to a particular school in a specific major, are available on the Glen Oaks Community College webpage under Student Services-Advising and in the Student Services Advising Office.

Please note: Transfer colleges frequently update programs to reflect current employer and occupation requests.

Note: The student is ultimately responsible for making sure that all preparatory work is completed to make transfer successful.

Common Transfer Programs

Listed below are areas of study for common transfer programs. If a transfer guide does not exist for one of these programs, a customized transfer guide can be created. Please contact a counselor.

Accounting
Advertising
Agriculture
Architecture
Art
Biology
Business Administration
Chemistry
Chiropractic
Computer Science
Criminal Justice
Dental
Dietetics
Economics
Elementary Education
Engineering Graphics
English
Family Life Education
Fish, Wildlife and Game
Foreign Languages
Forestry
Industrial Design
International Studies
Journalism
Law Enforcement
Liberal Arts
Librarianship
Literature
Manufacturing Administration
Marketing
Mathematics
Medical Assistant

Medical Technology
Nursing
Occupational Therapy
Paper Science/Engineering
Pharmacy
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physical Therapy
Physician’s Assistant
Physics
Political Science
Pre-Engineering
Pre-Engineering Electrical
Pre-Engineering Industrial
Pre-Engineering Mechanical
Pre-Law
Pre-Nursing
Pre-Science
Pre-Science/Pre-Dentistry
Pre-Science/Pre-Medicine
Pre-Science/Pre-Mortuary
Pre-Science/Pre-Optometry
Pre-Veterinary Medicine
Printing Management
Psychology
Public Administration
Recreation
Secondary Education
Social Work
Sociology
Special Education
Surveying

Custom Transfer Guides

If a standard transfer guide is not already available, advisors can students develop a custom transfer guide for any major, at any school in the United States. Please follow the procedure below to request a new custom guide:

  1.  Make an appointment with an advisor to discuss your course of study and the school you hope to attend after Glen Oaks (your target college).
  2. Request a custom guide for your school and your program. The advisor will develop a draft outline as soon as possible, and contact you for a follow-up appointment.
  3. Review the draft outline with the advisor and obtain copies for yourself and for your target college.
  4. Contact the admissions office at your target college, and request an evaluation of the draft copy. Mail, fax or hand-carry the guide to the college for study, changes and approval as necessary. If there are questions, the target college should be referred to your advisor at Glen Oaks.
  5. When the draft is approved, request a signature and date from the target college, then return the copy to Glen Oaks for your official file.
  6. Meet with the advisor each semester and carefully follow the custom guide.

 

General Transfer Information

  1. If a student chooses one target school and then decides to attend another target school, a new transfer guide must be generated. Example: If a student secures an agreement to go to Florida State and then decides to go to Arizona State, Arizona is not bound by the Florida agreement.
  2. If a student begins to study accounting and then decides to be a dentist, a new transfer guide will have to be made. The more dramatic the change of program, the more dramatic the consequences. Also, the later the change is made, generally the more dramatic the consequences.
  3. Nationally, no college is obligated to transfer a course that does not have a 2.0 (C) or better grade.
  4. Not all college courses are meant to build skills in an area and therefore, may not meet a certificate or degree requirement. However, if a student lacks the beginning skills, it may be necessary to take a class to master the required skill level.
  5. Some college classes are designed for technical study only. These classes may not transfer to another college. It is an error to believe that any college class will be helpful to reaching a specific goal. One should check with an advisor to be sure that a class will be helpful toward a particular goal.
  6. Classes can be taken for personal reasons. Many people take a class because they want or need it, knowing it will not transfer. Just because a class does not transfer does not mean it has no value. However, students are well advised to choose wisely when deciding how to spend their time, money, and energy.
  7. Generally, there is a limit of 62-64 semester hours that can be used toward a bachelor’s degree. There may be exceptions, but students shouldn’t plan to take over 62 credit hours without a planned agreement.

 

Transfer Partnerships

Transfer agreements between Glen Oaks and other colleges and universities make it possible for students to start their educational programs at Glen Oaks and be assured they can earn specialized or advanced degrees at a transfer institution, without loss of time or credit.

Students with plans for a 4-year degree or a specific marketable skill not offered at Glen Oaks can still get the advantage of a community college “start.”

Transfer Advising

Glen Oaks urges you to visit the advisors in Student Services to coordinate your joint transfer plans with the latest information from your transfer institution. Working together, Glen Oaks advisors can help you map a thorough and concise plan for reaching your goal.

Glen Oaks Transfer Programs

Transfer programs at Glen Oaks Community College offer the student an opportunity to participate in and receive certificates or degrees in programs of a specialized and advanced nature. Glen Oaks transfer programs are designed to allow students the opportunity to begin study at Glen Oaks and finalize their program through another educational institution. It is understood that a student will not receive the certificate or degree from Glen Oaks, but rather from the institution offering the finalized instruction.

Students should investigate and obtain advising before entering or attempting to follow a transfer program. Program work must be agreed to in advance with the participatory educational institution to guarantee transferability and full credit acceptance.

Glen Oaks advisors have complete curriculum guides listing courses that will transfer for the programs on the right, if they are taken at Glen Oaks. Remember to discuss these plans with your transfer schools t